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UPDATE Government Close to Achieving 90% UK Superfast Broadband Goal

Posted Friday, January 8th, 2016 (8:11 am) by Mark Jackson (Score 1,387)
superfast_broadband_meter

The Government’s Broadband Delivery UK project takes a lot of flak, but this often overlooks some of the good progress that has been made. New data now appears to confirm that the original 90% coverage target for “superfast broadband” (24Mbps+) availability is finally within touching distance.

At this point we should highlight that, prior to BDUK, commercial investment had already helped operators like BT and Virgin Media to expand fixed line superfast connectivity to around 70% of the UK. However those ISPs were slow or unwilling to invest in connecting the final 30%, which are more expensive to tackle, and so the Government’s BDUK programme was formed.

The 90% target was originally set as part of BDUK’s first funding phase (£530m from the Government / BBC TV Licence fee) and this was initially targeted to be achieved during 2015, although they later tweaked that to “by 2016” in order to allow some breathing room after administrative delays.

All of the contracts for BDUK Phase One are being delivered by BT, which has predominantly used its ‘up to’ 80Mbps capable Fibre-to-the-Cabinet (FTTC) service and a little FTTP. A second target also exists for pushing this coverage to 95% by the end of 2017/18 (adds another 1 million+ premises with some input from altnet ISPs), but we’ll focus on that after 90% is achieved.

The most recent data from BDUK, which was published at the very end of 2015 (here), reported that 3.5 million additional premises have so far benefited from the programme; the 90% coverage target is expected to be achieved at around the 4 million+ mark (a Spring 2016 completion is expected).

Naturally we wanted to offer a bit more data to show the current level of “superfast” (24Mbps+) and “fibre based” (includes lines that also deliver sub-24Mbps speeds) coverage by each local authority / district area. Luckily we can always rely upon Thinkbroadband to help us fill in the gaps and they’ve kindly furnished us with the full data.

Overall some 88.7% of the UK can now order a superfast broadband connection (92.5% for raw “fibre based” coverage), although obviously this estimate doesn’t account for any problems (slow speeds) caused by local network capacity or poor home wiring etc. Likewise the figures below only include the impact from BT, Virgin Media and KC’s deployments (altnets only have a tiny impact at national scale and aren’t yet factored).

NOTE: The following list of local authorities looks at more than county-level coverage. For example, Poole and Bournemouth are both part of Dorset in England, although they also have their own separate entries below. Likewise we also include districts.

Wales (85.1% “superfast”)

Authority Name % Fibre Based Coverage % Over 24Mbps (“Superfast”)
Abertawe – Swansea 95.5 92.9
Blaenau Gwent – Blaenau Gwent 99.1 96.5
Bro Morgannwg – the Vale of Glamorgan 93.6 90.1
Caerdydd – Cardiff 97.3 95.4
Caerffili – Caerphilly 97.1 94.2
Casnewydd – Newport 96.2 93.8
Castell-nedd Port Talbot – Neath Port Talbot 93.2 89.8
Conwy – Conwy 88.2 80.2
Gwynedd – Gwynedd 83.8 72.8
Merthyr Tudful – Merthyr Tydfil 99.1 94.2
Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr – Bridgend 96 93.1
Powys – Powys 63 52.7
Rhondda Cynon Taf – Rhondda Cynon Taf 97.9 94.3
Sir Benfro – Pembrokeshire 75.4 68.1
Sir Ceredigion – Ceredigion 62.1 51.7
Sir Ddinbych – Denbighshire 82.6 77.3
Sir Fynwy – Monmouthshire 80.3 71.5
Sir Gaerfyrddin – Carmarthenshire 71.4 65.7
Sir y Fflint – Flintshire 92.3 86.8
Sir Ynys Mon – Isle of Anglesey 81.4 72.5
Tor-faen – Torfaen 96.1 94.6
Wrecsam – Wrexham 91.7 85.8

Scotland (82.1% “superfast”)

Authority Name % Fibre Based Coverage % Over 24Mbps (“Superfast”)
Aberdeen City 93.2 91.2
Aberdeenshire 78.3 67
Angus 78.7 72.6
Argyll and Bute 50.2 43.7
City of Edinburgh 93.7 93.5
Clackmannanshire 85.6 84.4
Dumfries and Galloway 81.8 69.5
Dundee City 98.1 97.8
East Ayrshire 86.5 80.4
East Dunbartonshire 91.6 89.9
East Lothian 77.4 72.6
East Renfrewshire 90.8 89.4
Falkirk 90.4 89.4
Fife 87.5 85
Glasgow City 92 90.9
Highland 73.7 61.6
Inverclyde 90.3 88.6
Midlothian 76.6 71.3
Moray 82.4 73.8
Na h-Eileanan an Iar 39.7 26.1
North Ayrshire 81.4 77.5
North Lanarkshire 93.7 91.6
Orkney Islands 44 37.9
Perth and Kinross 70.2 62.9
Renfrewshire 91.8 90.3
Scottish Borders 72.8 61.9
Shetland Islands 48.4 38.9
South Ayrshire 85.1 81.4
South Lanarkshire 91.6 87.3
Stirling 80.3 74.7
West Dunbartonshire 95.8 95.2
West Lothian 84.5 82

Northern Ireland (77.7% “superfast”)

Authority Name % Fibre Based Coverage % Over 24Mbps (“Superfast”)
Belfast East 97.2 96.2
Belfast North 97.2 96.3
Belfast South 95.9 95
Belfast West 98.5 96.5
East Antrim 90.2 80.3
East Londonderry 95.5 74.8
Fermanagh and South Tyrone 94.6 56.4
Foyle 97.2 91.9
Lagan Valley 96.8 76.9
Mid Ulster 94.1 56.7
Newry and Armagh 95.5 63.7
North Antrim 89.3 61.6
North Down 96.2 90.8
South Antrim 93.9 73.5
South Down 91.6 59.7
Strangford 93.8 73.3
Upper Bann 94.3 80.5
West Tyrone 95 58.3

UPDATE: The entry for Shropshire has been updated to reflect a change to Thinkbroadband’s data, which slightly raises their figure to 81.4% “fibre” and 71.6% “superfast”. In addition, it’s important to note that this excludes Telford and Wrekin.

England (89.8% “superfast”)

Authority Name % Fibre Based Coverage % Over 24Mbps (“Superfast”)
Adur District 99.2 98.7
Allerdale District 87.1 80.9
Amber Valley District 94.8 88.3
Arun District 98.7 93.5
Ashfield District 98.9 97.5
Ashford District 87.8 78.7
Aylesbury Vale District 86.8 80.2
Babergh District 89.2 77.7
Barking and Dagenham 98.9 98.9
Barnet 95.5 94.2
Barnsley District 84.9 82.4
Barrow-in-Furness District 98.4 96.1
Basildon District 97.4 95.5
Basingstoke and Deane District 91.9 86.6
Bassetlaw District 92.9 87.9
Bath and North East Somerset 85.9 82.2
Bedford 90.1 87.8
Bexley 94.8 94.5
Birmingham District 95.5 95.2
Blaby District 96.7 94.8
Blackburn with Darwen 96.2 95.2
Blackpool 98.6 98.2
Bolsover District 96.4 92.7
Bolton District 97.9 97.5
Boston District 92.7 82.4
Bournemouth 99.2 98.9
Bracknell Forest 98.3 95.1
Bradford District 96.4 94.7
Braintree District 71.3 61.9
Breckland District 87.2 79.1
Brent 96.8 95.6
Brentwood District 88.9 86.3
Broadland District 90.7 85.5
Bromley 96.1 95.3
Bromsgrove District 92.1 85.5
Broxbourne District 99.6 99.1
Broxtowe District 97.8 97.5
Buckinghamshire County 92 86.7
Burnley District 99 97.4
Bury District 99 98
Calderdale District 90.6 86.4
Cambridge District 97.6 97.4
Cambridgeshire County 96.9 91.8
Camden 97.7 97.6
Cannock Chase District 97.9 90.9
Canterbury District 95.5 90.3
Carlisle District 91.2 87.8
Castle Point District 99 97.4
Central Bedfordshire 89.7 86.3
Charnwood District 96.1 94.2
Chelmsford District 90.1 86.5
Cheltenham District 96.9 96.4
Cherwell District 91.4 87.8
Cheshire East 95.2 90.1
Cheshire West and Chester 95.5 90.3
Chesterfield District 97 96.1
Chichester District 95.8 81.8
Chiltern District 93.4 90.6
Chorley District 97.5 94.8
Christchurch District 97.9 96.9
City and County of the City of London 19.1 15.4
City of Bristol 97.4 97.3
City of Derby 98 97.3
City of Kingston upon Hull 36.5 36.4
City of Leicester 95 95
City of Nottingham 97.7 97.2
City of Peterborough 98.6 96.6
City of Plymouth 98.3 97.3
City of Portsmouth 98.8 98.6
City of Southampton 96.2 96
City of Stoke-on-Trent 98.2 97.2
City of Westminster 73.8 71.8
City of Wolverhampton District 97.5 97.2
Colchester District 85.6 82.3
Copeland District 88.4 84.4
Corby District 96.3 95.8
Cornwall 96.1 86.1
Cotswold District 77.1 61.7
County Durham 95.8 90.3
County of Herefordshire 67.7 58.4
Coventry District 94.6 92.5
Craven District 91.5 81.8
Crawley District 99.5 98.6
Croydon 97.8 97.1
Cumbria County 88.8 82.7
Dacorum District 93.4 91.1
Darlington 94 92.4
Dartford District 96.9 93.6
Daventry District 84 76.3
Derbyshire County 92.7 87.4
Derbyshire Dales District 70.4 59.8
Devon County 81 71.7
Doncaster District 86.3 83.6
Dorset County 91.6 83.5
Dover District 96.2 88.3
Dudley District 96.1 96
Ealing 97.1 96.4
East Cambridgeshire District 98.5 86.6
East Devon District 81 70.6
East Dorset District 95.6 87
East Hampshire District 89.5 81.8
East Hertfordshire District 78.3 76.3
East Lindsey District 89 75.6
East Northamptonshire District 91.2 88.1
East Riding of Yorkshire 68.2 62
East Staffordshire District 92.7 85.7
East Sussex County 96.7 87.7
Eastbourne District 99.4 95.5
Eastleigh District 96.4 95.4
Eden District 76.7 64.6
Elmbridge District 99.6 99.2
Enfield 98.8 98.6
Epping Forest District 87.7 84.1
Epsom and Ewell District 98.6 98.1
Erewash District 97.5 95.8
Essex County 86.4 82.7
Exeter District 95.7 94.1
Fareham District 96.2 95.2
Fenland District 95.3 88.8
Forest Heath District 96 88.6
Forest of Dean District 73.5 65.9
Fylde District 93 90.3
Gateshead District 91.4 90.4
Gedling District 99.2 97.8
Gloucester District 96.9 95.4
Gloucestershire County 84.5 79.5
Gosport District 98.5 97.7
Gravesham District 96.7 95.5
Great Yarmouth District 96.4 92.9
Greenwich 95.8 94.9
Guildford District 98.2 94.8
Hackney 97.7 97.3
Halton 96.9 96.4
Hambleton District 93 76.2
Hammersmith and Fulham 94.2 90.7
Hampshire County 92.9 88.8
Harborough District 93.9 85.8
Haringey 98.2 98.2
Harlow District 98.5 98
Harrogate District 95.9 85.8
Harrow 98.1 98.1
Hart District 94.7 90.3
Hartlepool 96.4 94.6
Hastings District 96.6 93.9
Havant District 99.2 98.7
Havering 98.3 97.8
Hertfordshire County 93.4 91.8
Hertsmere District 97.9 96
High Peak District 87.6 81
Hillingdon 96.3 95.7
Hinckley and Bosworth District 94.8 92
Horsham District 97.7 84.7
Hounslow 98.6 98.1
Huntingdonshire District 97.6 93.3
Hyndburn District 99.4 97.7
Ipswich District 98.5 98.4
Isle of Wight 98 94
Isles of Scilly 99.5 92.7
Islington 96.7 95.8
Kensington and Chelsea 95.8 95.5
Kent County 94 88
Kettering District 94.7 93
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk District 90.2 80.4
Kingston upon Thames 99.4 98.9
Kirklees District 86.9 85.1
Knowsley District 97.6 97.3
Lambeth 96.5 94.4
Lancashire County 94.9 92
Lancaster District 93 89
Leeds District 96.5 94.3
Leicestershire County 94.7 91.2
Lewes District 97 90.4
Lewisham 96.2 94.3
Lichfield District 94.4 88.8
Lincoln District 99.2 99
Lincolnshire County 94.3 84.4
Liverpool District 95.5 95.2
Luton 99 98.4
Maidstone District 93.2 86.8
Maldon District 74.4 67.4
Malvern Hills District 77.2 68.1
Manchester District 93 92.3
Mansfield District 99.2 99
Medway 98.2 96.7
Melton District 82.3 77.2
Mendip District 76.7 71
Merton 98.8 98.6
Mid Devon District 68.1 57.1
Mid Suffolk District 81.4 65.8
Mid Sussex District 98.5 90.6
Middlesbrough 96 95.7
Milton Keynes 96 94.3
Mole Valley District 98.2 92.2
New Forest District 92.4 84.9
Newark and Sherwood District 93.4 88.7
Newcastle upon Tyne District 95.8 95.3
Newcastle-under-Lyme District 90.5 86.9
Newham 94.2 93.3
Norfolk County 90 83.8
North Devon District 80.9 73.7
North Dorset District 85.3 69.7
North East Derbyshire District 95.7 88.7
North East Lincolnshire 95.4 94.4
North Hertfordshire District 86.7 84.9
North Kesteven District 95.4 84.1
North Lincolnshire 92.9 87.3
North Norfolk District 81.4 73.3
North Somerset 87.4 82.1
North Tyneside District 88.9 88
North Warwickshire District 89.7 83.8
North West Leicestershire District 95.6 90.8
North Yorkshire County 94.6 82.5
Northampton District 96.6 96.5
Northamptonshire County 92 90
Northumberland 93.6 85.2
Norwich District 98.6 98.6
Nottinghamshire County 96.7 94.4
Nuneaton and Bedworth District 99.3 97.4
Oadby and Wigston District 98.4 98
Oldham District 98.5 97.8
Oxford District 97.9 96.7
Oxfordshire County 94 90
Pendle District 97.2 94.1
Poole 98.8 98.1
Preston District 94.8 94
Purbeck District 89.9 82.5
Reading 98.4 97.8
Redbridge 98 97.8
Redcar and Cleveland 92.5 91.6
Redditch District 97.9 96.8
Reigate and Banstead District 98.7 96.3
Ribble Valley District 92.9 82.8
Richmond upon Thames 97.4 97.3
Richmondshire District 93.2 75.1
Rochdale District 98.3 97.5
Rochford District 92.2 88.5
Rossendale District 99.2 96.3
Rother District 97.2 80.3
Rotherham District 83.1 79.9
Rugby District 91.2 85.9
Runnymede District 98 96.7
Rushcliffe District 95.5 92.1
Rushmoor District 98.2 97.2
Rutland 98.5 85.1
Salford District 96.3 95.9
Sandwell District 92.1 91.8
Scarborough District 97.4 91.2
Sedgemoor District 87.1 79.5
Sefton District 98.4 97.9
Selby District 96.8 83.9
Sevenoaks District 92.4 85.2
Sheffield District 87.5 85.5
Shepway District 87.1 79.5
Shropshire (excludes Telford and Wrekin) 81.4 71.6
Slough 97.9 97
Solihull District 96.3 93.1
Somerset County 85.9 77.9
South Bucks District 91.8 86.6
South Cambridgeshire District 95.7 90.5
South Derbyshire District 94.6 87.3
South Gloucestershire 98.2 92.6
South Hams District 71.7 60.8
South Holland District 94.5 81.4
South Kesteven District 94.7 88.2
South Lakeland District 87.4 77.8
South Norfolk District 84.2 75.8
South Northamptonshire District 81.9 78.8
South Oxfordshire District 90.3 85.3
South Ribble District 98.4 97.2
South Somerset District 89 79.2
South Staffordshire District 91.1 81
South Tyneside District 93.4 93.2
Southend-on-Sea 97.1 96.7
Southwark 90 86.6
Spelthorne District 98.4 97.9
St. Albans District 96.4 95.1
St. Edmundsbury District 91.2 84.3
St. Helens District 90 89.4
Stafford District 89.9 83.5
Staffordshire County 92.9 86.7
Staffordshire Moorlands District 84.4 75.1
Stevenage District 99.2 99
Stockport District 98.5 98
Stockton-on-Tees 94.4 93.5
Stratford-on-Avon District 80.2 68.3
Stroud District 64.4 58.6
Suffolk Coastal District 90.6 80.6
Suffolk County 91.9 84.5
Sunderland District 96.6 95.2
Surrey County 98.3 95.5
Surrey Heath District 98.5 97.1
Sutton 99.2 98.8
Swale District 93.4 86.7
Swindon 84.4 83.1
Tameside District 98.3 97.5
Tamworth District 99.6 99.3
Tandridge District 98.2 90.7
Taunton Deane District 89.5 82.5
Teignbridge District 86.1 76.7
Telford and Wrekin 90.5 88.3
Tendring District 83.8 80.5
Test Valley District 85.5 79.4
Tewkesbury District 85.7 81.2
Thanet District 98.8 96.6
The City of Brighton and Hove 99.3 99.1
Three Rivers District 97.7 94.5
Thurrock 94.7 92.1
Tonbridge and Malling District 95.1 87
Torbay 94 93
Torridge District 81.9 67.7
Tower Hamlets 81.1 74
Trafford District 98.4 97.6
Tunbridge Wells District 93.3 86.2
Uttlesford District 60.5 56.4
Vale of White Horse District 95.6 90
Wakefield District 97.2 93.1
Walsall District 95.1 94
Waltham Forest 98.9 98.9
Wandsworth 95.7 93.3
Warrington 96.7 95.2
Warwick District 96.4 93.3
Warwickshire County 91.7 86.4
Watford District 97 97
Waveney District 94.6 90.9
Wealden District 94.1 80.7
Wellingborough District 92.4 91.6
Welwyn Hatfield District 96 94.4
West Berkshire 87.8 81.9
West Devon District 68.7 51.9
West Dorset District 86.5 76.1
West Lancashire District 85.4 81.1
West Lindsey District 96.5 81.5
West Oxfordshire District 93.4 86.3
West Somerset District 77.8 68.3
West Sussex County 98.3 91.8
Weymouth and Portland District 97.3 95.1
Wigan District 98 97.4
Wiltshire 92.2 81.6
Winchester District 82.3 76.7
Windsor and Maidenhead 93.7 89.4
Wirral District 96.3 95.2
Woking District 98.7 98.1
Wokingham 95.5 92.1
Worcester District 98.5 97
Worcestershire County 91.1 85.5
Worthing District 99.6 99.4
Wychavon District 85.2 74.3
Wycombe District 95.9 90.8
Wyre District 92.4 89.8
Wyre Forest District 92.9 88.8
York 92.9 90

Check out the https://labs.thinkbroadband.com/local micro-site for a searchable database of broadband network coverage across the United Kingdom.

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23 Responses
  1. Ignition

    Bet they’re using the industry standard terminology of homes passed which is clearly inaccurate.

    Superfarce.

    So what if the project would still be trying to pass a million premises rather than having delivered uplifts to over 3 million were it PtP FTTP?

    So what if the project would’ve cost way more and run out of funding at 1/3rd the coverage provided by BDUK phase one, Gigaclear’s >£1.5k/premises passed being a metric implying this?

    Not to mention picking up on easier areas initially to maximise coverage. Should’ve all been hardest to do 5%, as that’s about all that would’ve been done with the funds available, never mind the other 25%.

    Even the FTTP being used isn’t ‘proper’ FTTP.

    Need real fibre; moral and optic.

    Happy New Year 🙂

  2. 3G Infinity

    90% by population would still leave over 3m homes assuming 2 people per house, that’s a lot but most probably better than Vodafone or EE coverage for 4G, let alone hundreds of locations [strangely on a roads, etc] that don’t have 3G, even after 13 years of rollout.

    • Tracking is done by premises not population.

    • Mike

      @Andrew

      It’d be interesting to see coverage by population.

    • To do the same analysis by population would remain relying on the 2011 Census data, and thus would not be covering business premises at all either.

      This is possible, but not sure of the value of the outcome beyond curiosity, i.e. so unless some value or my time is paid for then I won’t be re-jigging things to produce that output.

  3. timeless

    looks like the government is at it again.. they love to massage figures to make them look better.

    a good example of complete bullcrap is their recent press release that wage inequality has gone down.

    • The figures are independent via Thinkbroadband and actually exist to help check against the official Government stats, which are separately put out via Ofcom.

  4. jon

    Think it’s a great milestone myself, can’t please the haters

    • Valerie Whately

      The ‘ haters’ are those who are deprived of any kind of improvement. Of course we cannot be pleased if the promise to provide fast broadband to rural areas is not fulfilled. Those in deeply rural areas are farmers who, in these days, cannot compete in online auctions for livestock etc because of slow or non existent broadband. They are not the wealthier southern or eastern farmers, but the poorer hill farmers who have no broadband at all unless they purchase very expensive satellite provision. In these days of cheap milk etc they are often struggling for survival. These are the people who feel cheated by the claims of B T success. They are not waving ‘ no pleasing’ banners’ , but drowning. The so called success of fibre rollout to rural areas is a farce. The towns get it. The rural areas don’t ,

  5. Andrew

    Now is a good time to change up a gear then an get FTTH to the final 10%.

    • Ignition

      Excellent. Are you going to be paying?

    • Phil Coates

      Well we’ve already paid for the jump to 90% through our taxes so that BT can cherry pick the most profitable areas. Whats another 10%?

    • Ignition

      That 10% will cost considerably more than the previous ~20% did.

      It’s also disingenuous to claim that BT cherry picked the most profitable areas. They were given a budget and a coverage target, and have met both by most accounts, with increased coverage where budgets permitted. They’ve started handing money back where profits were being made due to takeup.

      Call me selfish with my taxes but I’d far rather the money had been spent providing 20% of the country with SFBB than 4% or less of the country UFBB.

    • Al

      Some of that final 10% might already be in progress of being completed. My area hasn’t yet been enabled but work has/is being done.

  6. DTMark

    Let’s have a look for this postcode. Neighbour is onto, I think, the 7th Openreach visit following cable re-routing, pair swaps and so forth to try to get their broadband speeds up to par.

    Distance to cab over 700m.
    Line length circa 1280m to 1680m.
    Shows as “Green” – superfast on the TBB map

    Speed test data showing average download of 16.4Mbps in the last 6 months, about level with the bottom of BT’s range B estimate, so within “specification”.

    “•Fibre (FTTC) is possibly available and speeds will likely be above 30 Mbps.”

    Really?

    It might be nice to see the methodology for working out the figures, correctly taking into account which cab premises are connected to, the line metal, gauge/ quality and length, and the effect of cross-talk. This would enable people to assess how optimistic the calculated numbers are.

    Is this information available?

    • The site you used does have a reporting corrections section, and if people just moan and don’t report in a useful manner one cannot correct the model. With ~95,000 cabinets there are bound to be some that are say 200m in the wrong direction, the model does have to have manual input sometimes.

      In short email me.

      In a perfect world it would be all sweet and light to share the raw data, but given the years of work already and the need to actually see some benefit beyond being shouted at from some quarters a full publication is not going to happen.

    • MikeW

      BT’s range estimates, both A and B, are for line speeds, aka sync speeds. Not download speed.

    • DTMark

      In this case the cabinet might be in the wrong place on your maps, for instance somewhere near the centre of the area as opposed to on the outskirts.

      That might explain why an area with lines over 1280m long are declared to be “likely to be higher than 30Mbps”.

      Except that the location of the cabinet and the location of the premises aren’t relevant, only the line length, metal, gauge and quality.

      So looking at the map it looks like everything within about a 1km radial distance of the cabinet is marked as ‘superfast’ which would be a hugely optimistic scenario, a belief which even BT don’t share since the estimate is 16 Mbps to 36 Mbps and actual speeds are at the bottom end of Range B.

      I wasn’t talking about sharing the raw data, merely the methodology used.

    • gerarda

      It must be horrendously difficult to get everything right. For example there is a postcode near us which cover a lateral distance of the best part of a mile. it is shown as having average speeds of 8Mbps but the spread is probably from just about superfast at the end nearest the cabinet, to 1or 2Mbps at the far end.

    • And if people mention a cabinet and its exchange then am always happy to go in and take a look, but if people are happy to just moan and not report issues, the issues will remain.

      90,000+ cabinets to position and over 1.7 million postcodes to deal with means this is not just a simple spread sheet affair.

    • DTMark

      It would seem to be a huge undertaking.

      However the location of the cabinets is not the determinant, the age, length and quality of the lines, is. I thought that only BT held this data?

      That the mapping uses the cabinet locations would indicate why a property with a line too long for superfast, is counted as superfast even though that would be highly unlikely to be achievable.

      Add in cross talk which can then see speeds fall by 25% quite easily, and a huge disparity emerges.

      The data is of course only estimated, so cannot really show what has been achieved by way of actual superfast coverage. It does seem to paint a very optimistic and unrealistic picture.

      In the murky world of coverage and speeds attainable – barely a week goes by on the TB website without someone popping up to say “was promised X and I only got Y” or “I just lost 20 Meg off my speed” – indicating the methodology so that people could assess how realistic the data is would be helpful.

      If, as it seems, it really is simply based on radial distance from cabinets, what distance classes as superfast and what multiplier is applied based on the length to arrive at a likely line length?

      e.g. over 600m apply a multiplier of 1.5 to get 900m line length, over 1000m apply a multiplier of 1.8 to get 1800m line length etc.

      Simply put I only need to look at this one postcode to very easily see that the data is highly optimistic and unrealistic, and should be treated with caution.

      Posting the methodology – the distances, multipliers, and down-rating factor based on likely cross talk would enable people to weigh the data with greater credibility.

  7. jon

    The fibre checker speed estimate is to the dp, and not always accurate if you have a few carrier poles feeding the property

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  • Sky Broadband £17.40 (*27.40)
    Up to 38Mbps (25GB)
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  • SSE £21.00 (*41.00)
    Up to 38Mbps (Unlimited (FUP))
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  • PlusNet £20.49 (*30.48)
    Up to 38Mbps (Unlimited (FUP))
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  • TalkTalk £22.70 (*37.20)
    Up to 38Mbps (Unlimited)
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  • Hyperoptic £21.00 (*38.00)
    Up to 100Mbps (Unlimited)
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