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Government Sets Tough Age Verification Rules for Internet Porn Ban

Wednesday, April 17th, 2019 (9:56 am) - Score 3,573
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The UK Government has sent final terms to Age Verification Providers for the related BBFC certification scheme, which sets strict rules for how such providers must verify a user’s age before allowing them to access a porn site. As before, broadband ISPs must block websites that fail to comply. The system will begin in July 2019.

Under the new rulescommercial websites” and “apps” that contain pornographic content must introduce an Age Verification system. All of this will be regulated by the British Board of Film Classification (predicted to cost them around £4.4m), which also gains the power to force broadband ISPs and mobile network operators into blocking those that fail to put “tough age [18+] verification measures” in place. Hefty fines could also be imposed.

NOTE: The BBFC will also be able to direct ISPs to block access to sites containing “extreme pornography“, regardless of whether AV controls are in place.

However thus far the proposals have been beset by concerns over the potential for weak privacy safeguards (e.g. handing passports and payment details to companies linked with porn peddlers = incredibly dumb), costs, the impact upon sex workers (i.e. pushing them off-line and back onto the streets), freedom of expression and technical limitations (easy to circumvent).

In particular a big question mark has remained over how the Age Verification system will actually work, which is vitally important because the infamous ‘Ashley Madison‘ hack has already highlighted just how dangerous such information could be in the wrong hands (multiple cases of blackmail and suicide etc.).

Despite the Government has today confirmed that the new system will go live on 15th July 2019 and a leaked post from the private porn industry site xbiz.net appears to have revealed some further details about how the AV system is set to work. As part of that the Government looks to have set some very strict rules.

Related systems will also be subjected to penetration testing, detailed audits (covering operational procedures over and above GDPR and the 2018 Data Protection Act) and “oneroues” reporting obligations with inspection rights attached (aka – Age-Verification Certificates). In other words, AV providers will find it to be a fairly costly system to run, which seems intended to deter weaker solutions and encourage good standards for data handling and privacy.

Key Points of the New AV System

– AV providers must collect only the minimum amount of personal data, enough to verify a users age. The user’s identity shall NOT be verified as part of the process. Some systems (e.g. AVSecure) won’t even retain consumer data like IP and email address details.

– No information about the requesting website that the user has visited shall be collected against their activity (i.e. if the database were ever breached then you couldn’t link a user to a specific site / content etc.).

– AV providers must only share the results of an age check with the requesting website.

– No data relating to the physical location of a user shall be collected during the AV process.

– No data collected during the AV process can be used for any other purpose, such as marketing or building digital wallets. AV providers must also avoid marketing such services to users both during and immediately after the process (note: this can still be done but it must be completely separate from the whole AV process).

– Users will get the option to verify their age without being required to setup an account with the AV provider.

– A prominent green coloured AV accreditation “kite mark” symbol will be used to help promote approved systems (no doubt scammers will quickly catch on to the idea of faking this).

The exact details of what data users will need to provide in order to verify their age are still unclear and we’re confused about how this will work if the user’s identity is not also verified. Previously we’ve seen suggestions of driving license and passport data being supplied, but this would surely identify the user too, although it sounds like the AV system simply won’t bother to check if those details are correct.

Similarly it’s unclear how people will be able to get off-line passes from shops, which is another supported method, without a shop keeper needing to check the user’s identity first (not that many people would be happy about having to ask for such a thing in a public shop). By the sounds of it this approach will be exploitable via fake IDs.

In any case the AV system will most likely involve some degree of geo-blocking (i.e. only showing up for those on a UK based IP address), which means that it should be easy to circumvent since IP addresses make for fairly useless indicators of geographic location (i.e. easy for end-users to spoof via VPN, Proxy Servers and all sorts of other methods).

Margot James, UK Minister for Digital, said:

“Adult content is currently far too easy for children to access online. The introduction of mandatory age-verification is a world-first, and we’ve taken the time to balance privacy concerns with the need to protect children from inappropriate content. We want the UK to be the safest place in the world to be online, and these new laws will help us achieve this.”

The catch here is that what the Government seem to be doing is using porn sites as a testbed to develop a system of age verification that could later be applied across a much wider category of sites (e.g. social networks), which by default effectively treats every internet user as if they’re a child (the recent Online Harms White Paper hinted at wider use of AV). Not at all insulting.

UPDATE 12:47pm

The Government has just sent out an official press release to confirm the mid-July launch of this system. Apparently further details will shortly be made available via the BBFC’s related website – https://www.ageverificationregulator.com .

Jim Killock, Executive Director of Open Rights Group, said:

“The government needs to compel companies to enforce privacy standards. The idea that they are ‘optional’ is dangerous and irresponsible.

Having some age verification that is good and other systems that are bad is unfair and a scammer’s paradise – of the government’s own making.

Data leaks could be disastrous. And they will be the government’s own fault.

The government needs to shape up and legislate for privacy before their own policy results in people being outed, careers destroyed or suicides being provoked.”

Andrew Glover, Chair of the UK ISPA, said:

ISPA supports the Government’s commitment to protecting child internet safety, and our members have long been at the forefront of online safety.

The new age verification measures are targeted at online pornography providers and are intended to prevent children from stumbling onto sites that contain commercial pornographic material. ISPs have an enforcement role in this policy to block websites that do not comply with these regulations and it is important to clarify that ISP blocking will only be used as a last resort. Our members are expecting high levels of compliance from online pornography providers, and it is the role of the regulator, the BBFC, to ensure that these sites remain committed to age verification.

Age verification represents a significant change to online content regulation. It is therefore important that this new policy is introduced sensibly and proportionately and that the public’s expectations are managed effectively. Our members will work collaboratively with the BBFC, providing constructive input to ensure that any challenges are swiftly addressed and the implementation of the regime is as effective as possible.”

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Mark Jackson
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
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49 Responses
  1. Avatar Phil

    Seems all very complicated. Surely the simplest system would be to have a central government website that you go to get a some authentication details to use, the government website asks enough details to confirm you are who you say you are and provides a code to use. Similar systems are already in place for things like giving hire car companies access to your driving license details on line https://www.viewdrivingrecord.service.gov.uk/driving-record/licence-number. The adult site asks you for your code which they authenticate with the government site which just passes back a Yes or No.

    This system could easily be of use for any time someone needs to prove they are over 18, for example applying on line for a credit card or loans or ordering items from a website that have an age restriction, which removes the stigma that you’ve just got it for pornography, as there are other reasons you might need the age verification check code.

    Most people would prefer giving details to gov.co.uk which already have all our passport numbers etc anyway, so they gain no extra information from us. They could make a nominal charge for the service, this would fund the system, adds another check, i.e. should a child could find the parents passport details etc they would still need the card, and if a child did use the parents credit card, this would show up on statements and alert the parent.

    • Avatar Mike

      You didn’t happen to work for the Stasi in the past did you?

    • Avatar Timeless

      this new system strikes me as open to being abused by the political classes, how long until its user to block content they find problematic.

  2. Avatar Salek

    Not sure what this check for websites is supposed to achieve – why dont they crack on social media first, there are plenty of fake face book and goggle you-tube accounts that need to be cracked down on first,
    if adult sites are causing problem – just ban them all

  3. Avatar ash

    Not going to provide any personal details to these websites, i will just use a vpn, government censorship because bad parents cannot control their kids,

  4. Avatar Phil

    @ash “Not going to provide any personal details to these websites, i will just use a vpn, government censorship because bad parents cannot control their kids,”

    It’s not about bad parenting, it’s about making things that are for adults unavailable to children, which we do for many things already in day to day live.

    Children can very easily find these XXX sites, either by accident or due to being told about them by other kids in the playground. If a child arrives at an off-licence, just because they can go through the door they still don’t get served alcohol, yet if they arrive at a pornography site they are let straight in unrestricted.

    I also agree there are other dangers out there on the internet, social media sites are not good for children fall-stop really.

    • Avatar t0m5k1

      What happens if they all block access from UK IP’s …no need to follow other governments rules?

      Britain should not be regulating an internet that from the wire up is designed to not have borders or rules.

      This will fail with obvious circumvention.

      The only way that won’t fail is to force all connectivity through a government provided proxy, Which has it’s own obvious downfalls.

    • Avatar Joe

      Give over Phil. Almost all major ISPs offer child filtering that can be enabled at no cost. You can also dl various apps etc that will do the same job locally on your PC. There is simply no need for this.

    • Avatar Mike

      Phil is our resident contrarian.

    • Avatar Timeless

      actually it is about bad parenting, there are plenty of options parents can use to protect their children but they choose not to use them.

    • Avatar SaveTheChildren

      “Children can very easily find these XXX sites, either by accident or due to being told about them by other kids in the playground. If a child arrives at an off-licence, just because they can go through the door they still don’t get served alcohol, yet if they arrive at a pornography site they are let straight in unrestricted.”

      Oh gawd where to even start with that ill thought out rubbish.
      A. Children can very easily pick up a newspaper and see a set of boobs, even a library book and see and read much more. If you want to stop children looking into the human body beyond that you would have to stop that type of access also. Children in fact human beings in general are naturally curious, they do not need others in a playground to encourage them.
      B. The off license as you say has a physical person there which prevents the child from obtaining the bottle which contains the alcohol, just as i assume at home the child has a physical person (IE the parent) there which should be preventing use of the computer or tablet which has the nasty porn inside it, if they are that concerned about what they may view.
      C. Banning something, making something illegal, telling a child something is bad without explaining to them why just encourages the child to investigate it more. That is why schools educate about drugs etc nowadays.

      In regards to your alcohol the superhero shop man is not going to be there to stop the child drinking alcohol which the parent may have bought and has at home. Young people are less adverse to risk. Even more so if you say one thing is ok for an adult to do but not a child, the child naturally wants to know why. I bet a far greater percent in this country had consumed alcohol before their 18th birthday rather than after it and quite often not due to their ‘school yard’ mates but adults letting them try it on a special occasion or similar… Amazing parenting decisions are fine in that instance eh.

    • Avatar Gedfan

      VPN, simples.

  5. Avatar Julian

    The simplest age verification system is to use a credit card, just like Germany uses for it’s Tobacco vending machines to prove someone is over 18… because you can’t get a credit card until you’re 18.

    However, that defeats the point. We need to be able to opt-out of all Age Verification and it’s up to parents to decide whether to impose age restrictions.

  6. Avatar Jigsy

    I’m still curious as to how the UK can force an overseas porn website to do anything they piss and moan like impotent jerks about…

  7. Avatar GucciGang

    All ISPs or just the big 6? Will be interested to see AAISPs take on this given their “unfiltered internet”

  8. Avatar Phil

    @Joe

    “Give over Phil. Almost all major ISPs offer child filtering that can be enabled at no cost. You can also dl various apps etc that will do the same job locally on your PC. There is simply no need for this.”

    I’ve also heard people argue that the ISP filtering wasn’t required as you can just set the browser up to reject adult sites.

    If there is no need for this then why are they doing it?

    I’d prefer to be treated like an adult and not have restrictions placed on websites I can access, but children are seeing this content and these extra steps are required.

    It’s not censorship, as no one is banning this content from being viewed, it’s just age verification at the source. We get age verified all the time, buying wine at the supermarket they visually confirm our age or if an element of doubt we need proof of ID, getting a credit or bank account, buying knives or solvents, going into adult bars or other adult venues or buying pornography from a shop, taking out a mobile phone contract, hiring a car and so on, the list is endless, yet it seems okay to you that pornography is available to anyone without the same age check and that those making and distributing this stuff have no legal responsibility to check it isn’t being supplied to minors, and you’re tell me to “give over”.

    • Avatar Joe

      Software is not 100% effective (even technically but thats applies to this policy as well). Its (as far as tech allows) fine if you just use a pc/laptop etc but many devices can now access the net that can’t run such software (including games consoles etc) ISP filtering doesn’t have that issue.

      “I’d prefer to be treated like an adult and not have restrictions placed on websites I can access, but children are seeing this content and these extra steps are required.”

      Its not as i’ve explained. Blocking is perfectly easy now for any parent who wishes. You’ve said nothing to counter my point; just repeated its required as though thats an argument in itself as to why gov lvl action is required.

      “buying knives or solvents, going into adult bars or other adult venues”

      Actually these don’t require ID. They may ask if they have concerns but its not required.

      Indeed apart from my passport going abroad and setting up some savings i’ve never had to provide an id for anything.

    • Avatar Jigsy

      >I’d prefer to be treated like an adult and not have restrictions placed on websites I can access, but children are seeing this content and these extra steps are required.

      So, what you’re saying is, you’re lazy at parenting?

    • Avatar SuperFast Dream

      There are so many existing tools available, including many for free, that would allow you to control protect the browsing habits of your little ones yourself.

      I won’t mention brands here but all can conduct category blocking via IP or MAC address, remember if you use DHCP you CAN manage your private home IP’s yourself, you can also conduct the blocking of Proxies, VPN’s, Tor etc and you really don’t need to be ‘tech savvy’ (god I hate those words) to do it, just read about the tools and understand and apply their best practice methods.

      You could start with an agent on the device itself, PC, Tablet, phone etc, then you could move on to Wireless AP filtering, some Wireless AP’s also offer some reasonable filtering services as part of the purchase cost, then you could have something like a UTM in place, then you have your Router or even your own Open DNS, goodness we haven’t even made it out of your network yet… Then you can rely on default blocking by your ISP and then the proposed Age verification system as an ABSOLUTE LAST RESORT.

      You could go even further still but let’s get real here, if your kids circumvent the above list and you have everything setup correctly then they should be sent straight to GCHQ for a job.

      Note; Unfortunately, you may have a bit more of an issue blocking videos of people being maimed or having their heads cut off among plenty of other nasty content on the likes of mainstream YouTube if they haven’t been flagged as inappropriate, but hey that doesn’t seem to be a concern of the government at this stage.

  9. Avatar Alloneword

    Or the kid could just take an photo of the mum or dads bank card or statement and away he (or she goes) jokers, another big database the Govt want to collect info on us.

  10. Avatar SqueakyUK

    Oh, it looks like my Hamster wheel will be doing overtime for the next few months, I will need to stock up on some oil to prevent it squeaking and waking up the neighbours.

    Now where is my 16 bay NAS….

  11. Avatar GreyHound

    The issues, why do the parents find sex a taboo, honestly like this is the 21st century, not the 5th century

    • Avatar Joe

      Macaulay was right as ever:

      “We know no spectacle so ridiculous as the British public in one of its periodical fits of morality.”

    • Avatar Phil

      @GreyHound

      “The issues, why do the parents find sex a taboo, honestly like this is the 21st century, not the 5th century”

      So you think 5, 6, 7, 8 year olds etc should be watching hard core pornography do you because its the 21st century?

    • Avatar SaveTheChildren

      “So you think 5, 6, 7, 8 year olds etc should be watching hard core pornography do you because its the 21st century?”

      I think parents should be responsible for their 5, 6, 7, 8 year olds, you know much in the same way they hold their hand and walk them to school rather than letting them go alone at that age and get abducted, mowed down by rush hour traffic or worse. They should perhaps be by their side when using the internet if it is as dangerous.

  12. Avatar Mike

    Perhaps the most easiest way to bypass this is just download Tor Browser, also as a bonus file-sharing sites are unblocked too.

  13. Avatar Phil

    @Joe

    “Actually these don’t require ID. They may ask if they have concerns but its not required.”

    I never said they required ID, but they will verify your age visually, if you look underage or are a child you will get questioned and refused entry unless you prove your age. There is no such check on a web site. If you pay a “porn pass” at a news agent you are not required to show ID unless you look underage.

    I don’t have children.

    I agree these things can easily be circumvented, the whole reason another layer of checks are coming about is because ISP blocks are being circumvented.

    This has nothing to do with sex education or families or people being prudish, it is to protect young children seeing such things. Would you be happy if you had young children who went to their friends house and they came home behaving oddly or upset because they’d seen hard core pornography? This pornography isn’t promoting family values is it, and some of it is violent in nature and very hard for a young child to understand, okay if you are consenting adults taking part in that activity and okay if you are a adult choosing to watch it, but its not for children.

    Put this another way, if you found out your local shop had been selling alcohol or cigarettes to your children, you’d make sure the shop was reported and they would lose their license etc, so why not make the adult porn industry responsible for who they sell to?

    If you have a better suggestion for how to stop innocent children viewing such material that is fool-proof and puts the burden on the supplier, the source, as we do for any other adult content or products, lets hear it.

    • Avatar Joe

      “I agree these things can easily be circumvented, the whole reason another layer of checks are coming about is because ISP blocks are being circumvented.”

      There is no evidence that this policy is driven by ISP level blocks being circumvented. Indeed nothing of substance has been submitted to any of the cmts that looked at this. Indeed this looks driven by virtue signalling politicians promising the impossible to the gullible. (the public ‘support’ was comically engendered by some motherhood and apple pie questions)

      We have no accurate figures but ISP level filters are not widely applied (many of which must have children.)

      As i’ve said before the block proposed is trivial to bypass.

      1) Download Opera (https://www.opera.com)
      2) Click on VPN
      3) …!

      Not that you really need to bother as it will only be applied to the large providers anyway. So the exact thing you are objecting to will still be easy to find even on the most ‘child’ used areas (like twitter)

      This whole proposal is so hopelessly unworkable and ineffective it would be funny were it not that some people actually appear to believe it will work. (Although I wonder if even many MPs do – but they will get votes out of posturing so they probably don’t care)

      “If you have a better suggestion for how to stop innocent children viewing such material that is fool-proof ”

      There is no way to do this. Anyone who thinks there is can phone me anytime I have some magic beans to sell.

    • Avatar SuperFast Dream

      @Joe, no phone call required, see my post above ^^^^.

  14. Avatar Paranoid

    Don’t suppose you have a list of the journalist that the PR was sent to?

  15. Avatar James

    This country is slowly turning into a North Korea state what next leaving your house after 11pm not allowed.

  16. Avatar Phil

    @James

    “This country is slowly turning into a North Korea state what next leaving your house after 11pm not allowed.”

    So because you need to prove you are over 18 to watch pornography on line that means we are turning into a North Korean state?

    How is this different from the fact we have to prove we are 18+ (if we don’t look it) to buy alcohol or cigarettes to prevent children having access to those adult products?

    • Avatar Larry

      Wait till they ban VPN Next Phil we are losing our freedom one by one stupid NANNY STATE COUNTRY.

    • Avatar George

      I’m inclined to agree. 1 turns into 2. 2 turns into 4 and so on.

    • Avatar Jigsy

      Whilst they can’t buy them, nor is anyone allowed to buy them on their behalf, you do realize a five-year-old can legally drink alcohol on a private property, yes?

      E.g. Wine with a meal.

    • Avatar SaveTheChildren

      “So because you need to prove you are over 18 to watch pornography on line that means we are turning into a North Korean state?”

      Pretty much because if you knew anything the legal age of consent in this country it is 16. So all that naughty stuff you want under 18s banned from watching they quite possibly have physically been doing for 2 years before.

      “How is this different from the fact we have to prove we are 18+ (if we don’t look it) to buy alcohol or cigarettes to prevent children having access to those adult products?”

      The law actually states it is illegal to sell alcohol or tobacco to under 18s. It does not state anywhere that anyone has to prove their age to obtain it. It is at the discretion of the shop owner to ensure who they sell to is Over 18.

      Tobacco much like sex which you are confused about you can legally consume when you are 16 but not be sold legally until you are 18.

      Alcohol which you also keep comparing to these new draconian porn laws to is also a different matter entirely. Yes you have to be 18 or over to purchase it, however your argument then falls apart because we are talking consumption of alcohol and porn. If you want to compare alcohol consumption to porn consumption the legal age to consume alcohol on public premises when accompanied by an adult and given with a meal is 16 or over, as long as the adult is the purchaser.

      The legal age to consume alcohol in your home or other private residence (you know much like a child may be consuming the nasty porn in the home)…. Err well sorry to tell you this but a child aged five to 16 can drink alcohol at home or on other private premises as much as they like.

      This dates back to The Children Act 1908 which makes provisions for parents to give alcohol to a child, where it once though alcohol could be used as an anaesthetic. Much like this porn law utterly stupid indeed, but that is the actual facts and law which you think is marvellous with regards to age restrictions and consumption of certain products in society.

      Then again its clear from all your posts here you do not have children and certainly have no idea about the law.

  17. Avatar Ryan

    Age Verification for porn sites what a joke, sure they might be able turn the screws on UK based sites to comply to the rules, but most porn sites are not UK based so don’t have to follow any UK laws.

    In that case what are UK government going to do then block all foreign non compliance site like that going to work there are too many sites so how are they going to get ISP to block it dns based easy to bypass, IP based too much collateral damage if hosted at CDN/proxy like Cloudflare, checking http/sni host header I doubt any ISP want check ever site visited against a list of 10000’s sites.

    I personally think parents should do more to stop there kids looking at them site as most just give there kids the devices and don’t ever setup any filtering e.g web parental control.

    • Avatar CarlT

      No need to check every site ever visited. Perfectly possible to select some by IP and inspect them further. Happens already.

  18. Avatar Meadmodj

    I hope the Government put as much effort into the fake Age-verification Provider sites that will spring up and yet more approved Age-verification Providers storing identify information. What possibly could go wrong.

  19. Avatar Optimist

    Big Sister is watching you!

  20. Avatar FullFibre

    This is mind numbingly daft, the idea that a few sites with age verification on will stop anyone accessing porn is so ridiculous it beggers beleif. Good luck keeping up with and blocking sites that don’t comply. Let alone it being childs play to circumvented existing blocks.

    All this does is give some parents a false sense of security. It doesn’t protect minors.

    If protecting minors is really the aim then education is the key, placebo blocks are the exact opposite of a solution. Everyone including those inventing this pointless scheme knows that though.

  21. Avatar Jigsy

    Thinking about this now, I wonder how difficult it would be for someone to set up a fake “Age Verification” website to vacuum up people’s PII?

    I have a feeling the next few months are going to be quite interesting.

  22. Avatar Gary HILTON

    Given the fact I’ve spent well over an hour today bashing my head against the pitiful system that it the Gov.uk ‘Verify’ setup so I can file my tax return again this year, It’s quite possible no one will be able to watch porn legal age or not.

    I tried the Post office verify as one of the Gov approved sites, It couldn’t verify my driving licence details, couldn’t verify My British passport, then the option of mobile phone service provider (choice of EE or O2 only) couldn’t confirm that either, leaving me with insufficient ID to continue. I was offered the option of taking a selfie with my face and passport visible !!!

    This coupled with the code generator APP that cant sync its time with their system to allow the 30 second expiry OTP code to pass validation.

    Sadly as mentioned It’s going to be a scammer paradise, but I’m sure the puritans will laugh it up as the victims ‘deserve it’

    Prohibition gets you nothing but a black market and criminal elements profiting from the demand. Regardless of the need to ‘protect our young’ Politicians don’t like anything they cant control. Look at the TPD for example, 5ml vape tanks are illegal because someone decided 2ml was all you could have, so people just carry a refill bottle !

  23. Avatar Tanon

    On a lighter note…

    …anyone else snigger at the phrase “penetration testing” in this context

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