Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

Another UK ISP for Video Gamers Launches – Ghost Gamer Broadband

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2019 (1:34 pm) - Score 6,696

Business ISP Structured Communications has today fully launched a sibling provider called Ghost Gamer Broadband, which as you might expect from the name “aims to deliver a best-in-class online experience to the UK’s competitive online gaming community.”

According to the announcement, GGB seeks to offer “resilient and stable connectivity, allowing for uninterrupted and responsive gameplay.” On top of that it pledges to provide “some of the lowest ping rates consumers may encounter on the internet” and “direct links to popular gaming services [for] the best possible experience on those platforms.”

The ISP adds that it’s served by multiple 10Gbps upstream fibre circuits and “unlike many home broadband providers, Ghost does not throttle connections or establish data caps.” In fairness data caps have long since been removed by most providers and very few truly “throttle connections” today.

Otherwise GBB appears to offer a mix of ADSL, FTTC, FTTP and G.fast based broadband packages on Openreach’s national UK network, which are all accompanied by unlimited usage allowances, 12 month contract terms, a static IP address and an included wireless router (they don’t say what model and gamers are likely to want to know such details).

Chris Dale, MD of Ghost Gamer Broadband, said:

“The internet plays an increasingly vital part in our everyday lives, yet the quality of the broadband entering our homes is often overlooked. This just leads to frustration.

The importance of a stable and fast connection, which maintains its quality during peak times, is essential for online gaming – low ping rates are a necessity at any hour. At Ghost Gamer Broadband we have developed a solution which always provides users with the fastest possible connection, irrespective of fluctuations in demand.”

Sadly the website itself doesn’t offer a lot of detail on their packages or prices, although they seem to be promoting “up to” speeds instead of the required “average speeds“. One other problem we noticed is that their website promotes service prices that exclude the £10 monthly cost of line rental (you only see this when running through their order system), which is something the ASA requires to be made clear.

Prices including line rental start at about £39.99 for an ADSL (up to 20Mbps) package and £53.99 for their FTTC (up to 80Mbps) service, which is quite pricey. Much as we said when a similar ISP called Leetline launched a few months ago (here), there’s a limit to how much you can tweak such connections in order to extract improvements in latency.

In reality most ISPs setup their networks in the same broad way and there are plenty of other providers that could make the same sort of claims as GBB (AAISP, iDNET, Zen Internet etc.), albeit without specifically advertising themselves as being designed for multiplayer gamers (it’s just kind of expected).

The GBB website includes a comparison of latency performance but the test is only from a single FTTC line and their comparison ISP is not named.

gbb ping comparison

Finally, GBB said it will deliver a “competent, high-performance service which families can expect to use simultaneously, without fear of dropouts or slowdown.” Obviously no ISP can guarantee this on services provided via copper lines, which can and do suffer from all sorts of complex stability and performance problems. Lest we forget external impacts from issues such as slow WiFi and local network congestion.

At the end of the day your latency (ping times) depends most of all on the capabilities of the physical connection technology itself (e.g. FTTP vs FTTC), remote server performance (e.g. the server for the game you’re connecting to) and your own network setup / configuration. A good ISP’s routing / peering arrangement can help and so does maintaining an uncongested network but, as above, other ISPs could make similar claims.

Share with Twitter
Share with Linkedin
Share with Facebook
Share with Reddit
Share with Pinterest
Mark Jackson
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
Leave a Comment
28 Responses
  1. Avatar NE555

    Judging by the advertising, these guys are totally clueless.

    “Time-to-live (TTL) is a value in an Internet Protocol (IP) packet that tells a network router whether or not the packet has been in the network for too long and should be discarded”

    That’s more or less correct. However the initial TTL is set by the originating endpoint, and decremented by each intervening router. So a higher received TTL value means that the packet has been through fewer routers, and hence fewer links; and therefore the result shows the “competitor” as better than they are!

    I wouldn’t touch them with a barge pole.

    • Avatar CarlT

      TTL is basically meaningless unless it hits zero. Why they have included it as a metric is beyond me.

    • The following is a response forwarded by ISPreview.co.uk on behalf of ISP Structured Communications:

      Hi NE555, you are correct in what you have said, and this was down to a miss communication between ourselves and our marketing company. As soon as we spotted the error the images where changed on the website. Unfortunately, the one on ISPreview remains incorrect.

      We take the user experience very seriously here at Ghost. We place all our lines on the Openreach NGA “SPEED” profile or “STANDARD” for WBC connections. On our network we have our own blend of peering and transit. We are connected to both LANs on the LINX exchange and have manual sessions with most of the CDN networks who carry majority of the AAA game title traffic. Our core links within the network are a minimum of 10Gbps with a redundant hardware configuration. Our network is monitored in-house with over 2000 sensor points and pre-set thresholds for alerting and corrective action. We are always reviewing the network and happily take feedback from users for where we can improve an experience.

  2. Avatar Boo Hoo

    “Ghost does not throttle connections or establish data caps.”

    Utter rubbish. They apply a 1 TB “soft cap” monthly limit to their standard FTTC/P services on the Structured Communications platform and they do the same on their Ghost Gaming service. They told me that over the phone.

    • Avatar Kurt Whittaker

      Hi Boo Hoo,

      We did used to have a soft cap but due to feedback from the community we can confirm we no longer have any soft caps on any of our products, you can check out our updated terms and conditions on our website.

      Many thanks,

      Kurt @ Ghost Gamer Broadband

  3. Avatar Ciaran

    Very interested to see how this works out if you have another provider at home (Virgin Media) how would one have this ISP installed if there is as I’ve said another ISP being used?

    • Avatar Ciaran

      Forgetting to mention I am having a terrible time with gaming via Virgin. Have had two techs out in the last month, one is at my property as I type. He’s been at two separate cabinets and changed cabling. There’s definitely an issue here. If he fixes it then all good. If not I’ll possibly look into this service or something similar.

    • You’d probably need a new line installed via Openreach, using a separate master socket. Most homes already have some wiring for traditional phone lines but a new provision may add c.£100 to the setup cost.

    • Avatar Mike

      Are you gaming over WiFi?

    • The following is a response forwarded by ISPreview.co.uk on behalf of ISP Structured Communications:

      Hi Ciaran Virgin use their own network coaxial network (and in some places fibre.) To get services from Ghost you would need an Openreach line which we can provide directly. You can check what available services we can offer you via our website. https://www.ghostgb.co.uk (these include ADSL2+, FTTC, FTTP and G.Fast currently).

  4. Avatar Christopher Woodhead

    Fttp 160/30 is £64.99 and 330/50 is £89.99 which is way more than I pay for bt 330/50 I got it for £52 18 month contract.

    • Avatar Bob

      I used to get those ping times to those destinations with Sky FTTC on a long line (I assume this worsens things, line only capable of 15Mbps).

    • The following is a response forwarded by ISPreview.co.uk on behalf of ISP Structured Communications:

      FTTP does carry a higher price tag than the copper based FTTC and ADSL based products at a wholesale level. We are constantly reviewing our costs both internally, and with our wholesale partners, to provide the best possible pricing to customers on a 12-month maximum term.

  5. Avatar Ciaran

    I used to have BT infinity when it first arrived out, those lines are still installed. The problem for me is I’d want the line installed in a bed room upstairs for the phone as well. Could they run a new line of the master socket and install the router and phone combo in the room? with the same performance? if I remember there was another phoneline in the back room I wonder would that work? was installed in the old BT Broadband days way back when

    • Avatar Lex

      If you already have a phone line and socket installed, bt/ISP won’t even come out you just get a router in the mail

      You can pay them move the master socket but it cost you more then what it’s worth

    • The following is a response forwarded by ISPreview.co.uk on behalf of ISP Structured Communications:

      Openreach can at times (despite a new order being placed) opt to re-use an existing old ceased line when providing a new service. This is typically flagged during the ordering process or we will get noticed via an Openreach “KCI” message. Where we are made aware of this before the install, we will make a request with Openreach and request that this be returned to an engineering visit. Should this not occur, then we will look at options with the End User and discuss the best way forward. We work with Openreach direct and don’t follow a pre-defined script as we understand every scenario is different.

  6. Avatar Marty

    Pointless provider unless they have some rollout of FTTP in mind. Finding a way to better way to alter FTTC or docsis which is covered by openreach & Virgin anyway so you could say it’s mostly PR hogwash

    • The following is a response forwarded by ISPreview.co.uk on behalf of ISP Structured Communications:

      We do provide services made available to us from Openreach as do many of the other UK ISPs. We are also looking at wholesale options with the “Alt-net” providers around the UK and already have contracts in place to use the Cityfibre network which is available to order manually via Ghost subject to availability. We hope to have this integrated into the portal soon. While the last mile of infrastructure is owned by a 3rd party (in this case Openreach) it only accounts for a small part of the user experience.

  7. Avatar Steve

    Great idea, terrible execution. Certainly is room for an ISP marketed in this way but I can’t help but feel it’s no different to a broadband connection with RGB stuck on it.

    It’s no secret that business grade broadband doesn’t suffer as badly at peak times, that’s because businesses are closed but they offer little more clues to explain WHY they are better.

    Can they reduce latency from my house to the exchange? No, of course not. So they are no better than the rest (who are 1/2 if not 2/3 of the price).

    • Avatar JmJohnson

      No they can’t but they can optimise the hops afterwards…
      I have 2 leased lines here… one from Daisy, the other is BT… Daisy to NY is 94ms, BT to NY is 73ms.
      Shows how different approaches to infrastructure can affect the service provided.

    • The following is a response forwarded by ISPreview.co.uk on behalf of ISP Structured Communications:

      Hi JMJohnson, you are 100% correct and the example you have provided is a good example of what we see on a day to day basis so thank you. Yes, we are a smaller ISP but we have very focused staff within the network team who have spent a large amount of time optimising our network to provide the best possible service we can. As with every ISP there is always the want to better what is already in place and we have continued investment within our network being it is in the heart of everything we do. We pride ourselves in the fact our network team will speak directly to end users without a wall of escalation.

    • Avatar Steve

      Daisy….renowned for their quality products LOL
      They can only be responsible for the hops within their networks which as a small scale ISP goes is likely a router in a rack in a datacentre so we’re talking about maybe a couple of peers and an uplink? Not a lot of room for optimisation there.

    • Avatar JmJohnson

      If only ISPs invested in multiple uplinks thus providing different routes and then used algorithms so that your traffic took the fastest routes…
      If only all ISPs used dedicated infrastructure instead of virtualised pipes…
      If only all ISPs provided direct pass through to their core backbone…

      The list of differences between ISPs is larger than you know and your understanding of how networking works seems to be lacking
      (Note – I’m not defending this overpriced ISP… just trying to highlight there’s more to networking than you assume)

    • The following is a response forwarded by ISPreview.co.uk on behalf of ISP Structured Communications:

      Hi Steve, we aim not to be the bottle neck even when gaming during the day! And truth be told business use less resources on our network than residential. Therefore, we see more bandwidth demand outside of normal business operating hours. In respect to latency, we place all services that migrate to us on the Openreach NGA “SPEED” profile or “STANDARD” for WBC connections. This will prioritise speed over stability for online gamers and we do see a reduction in latency and an uplift in speed on circuits. In our experience, this is in part due to the fact the previous ISP (ISP dependant) will have had the line on a profile designed for stability from our experience. On our network we have our own blend of peering and transit. We are connected to both LANs on the LINX exchange and have manual sessions with most of the CDN networks who carry majority of the AAA game title traffic. All our core links within the network are a minimum of 10Gbps with a redundant hardware configuration. All our network is monitored in-house with over 2000 sensor points and pre-set thresholds for alerting and corrective action. We are always reviewing the network and happily take feedback from users for where we can improve an experience.

  8. Avatar Jamie

    Pointless it’s BTs cable. If you want fast Virgin media is the best I have 350mb down 35mb up. No other isp in the UK can compare. I worked for telewest and ntl back in the day. Then for BTs sub contractor Enterprise doing LLU (local loop unbunderling) within BT actual exchange. As far as I see it only has two actual Internet providers exist, BT and Virgin media. As everyone else piggybacks of BTs cable etc. I do agree virgin has issues. Over the last 20 years in telecoms I’ve seen it always the same with Yorkshire cable, diamond cable, telewest, ntl, virgin media it’s always been the same you ever get an amazing service or a bad service and honestly the bad is very very small. More people complain the praise so you see issues more. But honestly virgin media is the way to go. I still pay very little through service as I worked for them for many years but you can get 350mb down TV and phone for £39. No other isp comes even close. And you get what you pay for with virgin media speeds. You always get more than advertised. With BT and all the others it’s “up to” x speed. And you never get close. For example. My area BT offers up to 35mb and up to 75mb. Your lucky if you get 18mb.

    • Avatar Mark

      It’s not BT it’s Openreach, and no they aren’t really operated by BT anymore.
      Secondly Virgin piggybacks off Sky too on its backbone.. so what does that say? And vice verse for Sky..

      On the backbone in fact I’d say Sky is second to BT as a whole owned network.
      No idea if Virgin has its own backbone or just uses everyone else. But I’ve seen and heard PLENTY of stories of Virgin capping speeds.

    • Avatar Ciaran

      Show me were I can get those speeds, plus tv for 39 a month. I am paying 43 soon to be 47 for 200mb, appreciate the info

    • The following is a response forwarded by ISPreview.co.uk on behalf of ISP Structured Communications:

      Hi Jamie. As you pointed out, Openreach own the physical infrastructure in the ground and is then offered to ISPs to provide services on (such as BT, Talk Talk, Sky and Ghost ect.) Granted a number of ISPs use BT Wholesale between their core network and some exchanges (ourselves included) but each ISP core deployment is very different with their own blend of transit and peering, hardware and resilience. We are also looking at wholesale options with the “Alt-net” providers around the UK and already have contracts in place to use the Cityfibre network which is available to order manually via Ghost subject to availability. We hope to have this integrated into the portal soon. We understand people may have a reluctance to use the Openreach infrastructure, and we work very differently with them than…?. While the last mile of infrastructure is owned by a 3rd party (in this case Openreach) it only accounts for a small part of the experience.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £19.95 (*22.00)
    Avg. Speed 50Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Promo Code: HYPER20
  • SSE £22.00
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Plusnet £22.50 (*35.98)
    Avg. Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: £50 Reward Card
  • xln telecom £22.74 (*47.94)
    Avg. Speed 66Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Onestream £22.99 (*34.99)
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Prices inc. Line Rental | View All
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. BT (2741)
  2. FTTP (2670)
  3. FTTC (1768)
  4. Building Digital UK (1723)
  5. Politics (1631)
  6. Openreach (1592)
  7. Business (1403)
  8. FTTH (1330)
  9. Statistics (1223)
  10. Mobile Broadband (1195)
  11. Fibre Optic (1048)
  12. 4G (1027)
  13. Wireless Internet (1009)
  14. Ofcom Regulation (1004)
  15. Virgin Media (992)
  16. EE (678)
  17. Sky Broadband (662)
  18. TalkTalk (653)
  19. Vodafone (651)
  20. 5G (487)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms , Privacy and Cookie Policy , Links , Website Rules , Contact