Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

Openreach Discount 10Gbps Cablelinks for FTTP Broadband ISPs

Saturday, October 19th, 2019 (12:01 am) - Score 5,265
fttp_splitter_build_openreach

UK ISPs that make use of Openreach’s network via their “gigabit-capable” Fibre-to-the-Premises (FTTP) broadband products may be pleased to learn that the operator has discounted the price of their 10Gbps Cablelink services, which helps to provide the capacity for such full fibre connections.

Under the deal Openreach will – between 18th November 2019 and 31st March 2020 – reduce the 10 Gigabit GEA Cablelink connection charge from £1,042 to £521 +vat. This offer will apply to all GEA-FTTP only Layer 2 Switches UK wide and the discount will be limited to one 10G cablelink per FTTP only Layer 2 Switch per ISP (it is NOT available where a Layer 2 Switch is also supporting slower FTTC services).

The offer is said to be “aimed at encouraging [ISP] consumption and sales of FTTP on available infrastructure throughout the UK. It will enable CPs to future-proof their Cablelink infrastructure investment by making 10 Gigabit as affordable as 1 Gigabit for a limited duration.” Further details here.

Not so long ago a 10Gbps Cablelink would have cost £10,000 just for the connection charge. How times change.

Share with Twitter
Share with Linkedin
Share with Facebook
Share with Reddit
Share with Pinterest
Tags: , ,
Mark Jackson
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
Leave a Comment
25 Responses
  1. Avatar CarlT

    Very smart move on the part of Openreach. Encourages take up of the Cablelinks that’ll be needed to support the upcoming higher speed residential services.

    • Avatar Vince

      A £500 or so adjustment will make absolutely sod all difference. They get the discount only on one, and trust me, £500 to an ISP is nothing as a one off cost adjustment in real terms.

    • Avatar CarlT

      I’ll trust you but you’re wrong about them getting that discount on one, full stop.

      It’s one per OLT per provider.

    • Avatar A_Builder

      Very useful if you have a FTTB/P tower block fed by 1 x 2.5G and it is getting saturated a quick and relatively cheap bandwidth upgrade.

      Now the Alt Nets are doing some many MDU’s I can see real demand for this and it should show readily in improved throughout

    • Avatar CarlT

      This is of no benefit to altnets. Openreach GEA only.

    • Avatar CarlT

      It also does nothing for capacity on the PON side and doesn’t apply to a single PON.

      In the unlikely event 32 punters are using a full GPON downstream the only solutions are to overlay the GPON with something else or to reduce the premises served by the PON.

      This is a discount on a port out the back of an Openreach OLT serving many PONs.

    • Avatar A_Builder

      CarltT

      Yes I understand it link to potentially many PON’s and that the link is inside the exchange.

      An MDU like atower block likely has more than one PON, if that is the architecture.

      Some providers are using lower capacity links in the exchange, not long ago 10Gb was v expensive, increasing the capacity of the link will help with better service delivery/provision. That is all I’m saying OK badly expressed.

    • Avatar CarlT

      This doesn’t really help with that. I’m not aware of a single instance of Cablelink congestion on FTTP-only kit. Can cram a lot of FTTC punters onto a gigabit Cablelink without issues and congestion would get very obvious really quickly.

      Backhaul out of the exchange a different matter and one that won’t be helped by this though pricing has been aggressive on it for a while.

      BT Wholesale won’t sell 500+ without a 10 Gb Cablelink. This helps them and Sky/TalkTalk get things ready for the low cost hyperfast stuff coming next year.

    • Avatar NE555

      I think the point is: this in exchanges where FTTC and FTTP are on separate layer 2 equipment, service providers were holding back from taking connections on the FTTP side because with few customers to serve, the cost didn’t justify it.

      This reduction in cost, together with increasing coverage of FTTP, helps to make it viable. Which in turn may encourage more service providers to start selling FTTP, hence more take-up of FTTP by end users – a virtuous circle.

    • Avatar A_Builder

      @ NE555

      Very well put.

      But we are all agreed it is a GOOD thing…..

    • Avatar CarlT

      Just need rid of the ECI poop now. No 10 Gb available on those at all and not really required as the 1G lines can address at most 128 FTTP punters.

  2. Avatar Drew

    They should get people running on 10 megabytes per second before they start worrying about gigabytes it would be nice to have decent internet instead of the crap speeds we get that we can’t even watch YouTube without it buffering

    • Avatar Jake4

      You know this is about the connection off Openreach’s network, not to people’s houses. This just basically means it’s going to be a bit cheaper for ISPs to sell FTTP if they pass this discount over to consumers.

  3. Avatar chris conder

    Yes how times are changing… shows what competition can do. People have short memories, I hope you have an archive of all your posts Mark. This could have happened 10 or more years ago instead of all the first round of funding going into obsolete fttc just to make a few go a bit faster.

    Bring on the trolls.

    • Avatar TheFacts

      You clearly don’t understand what this is about.

    • Avatar CarlT

      Cablelinks are nothing to do with availability of FTTP or FTTC, Chris.

      They are how providers connect to the Openreach equipment serving customers.

    • Avatar A_Builder

      Hmme

      But costs impact on the business case for building.

      Lowers costs = better business case = more likely finance = higher rate of build out

    • Avatar CarlT

      The only thing they will help with is the business case to connect directly to Openreach rather than via BT Wholesale.

      This will be aimed at getting Sky and TalkTalk on board with FTTP alongside making it more cost effective for Wholesale.

  4. Avatar Tim

    This is just a patch cable between the ISP’s rack in a Openreach exchange to the aggregation switch in the same exchange.

    • Avatar CarlT

      Interestingly Tim the switches are part of the OLTs that serve customers.

      It’s a single chassis that may or may not have GPON line cards to serve FTTP and may or may not have cabinets connected to GigE ports on other line cards.

      All the same chassis, just the line cards that change, and in the case of this offer the chassis may only have PON cards and Cablelinks.

      The exception being the ECI stuff. The less said about the options Openreach took on that the better. The kit has no switching fabric backplane – can only connect to customers connected on the same line card.

      The PON cards on that stuff are 4 x GPON, 8 x GigE.

  5. Avatar Mark Dawson

    Nice header photo, wonder where that’s from

  6. Avatar Marty

    Will this help people get the same speeds up and down.

  7. Avatar David

    That’s a good price. I was charged £600 to have a connection from the box in the tree to my house – I know it’s not the same but this is good to see – Hopefully the link I am on does not get too bogged down but if it does they might be able to upgrade it further at the exchange as more people join

  8. Avatar Spurple

    Looking forward to the annual price rises next year for the same speeds.

    🙂

    /s

Leave a Reply to Spurple Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £21.00 (*25.00)
    Avg. Speed 50Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: £50 Shopping Voucher
  • SSE £22.00
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited (FUP)
    Gift: None
  • xln telecom £22.74 (*47.94)
    Avg. Speed 66Mbps, Unlimited (FUP)
    Gift: None
  • Post Office £22.90 (*37.00)
    Avg. Speed 38Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Direct Save Telecom £22.95 (*29.95)
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Prices inc. Line Rental | View All
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. BT (2553)
  2. FTTP (2292)
  3. FTTC (1688)
  4. Building Digital UK (1627)
  5. Politics (1457)
  6. Openreach (1444)
  7. Business (1273)
  8. FTTH (1125)
  9. Statistics (1118)
  10. Mobile Broadband (1068)
  11. Fibre Optic (984)
  12. Ofcom Regulation (930)
  13. Wireless Internet (929)
  14. 4G (926)
  15. Virgin Media (876)
  16. EE (607)
  17. Sky Broadband (602)
  18. TalkTalk (587)
  19. Vodafone (542)
  20. 3G (418)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms , Privacy and Cookie Policy , Links , Website Rules , Contact