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3000Mb service

GreenLantern22

ULTIMATE Member
Already enjoying CFL 920Mb plan and thinking in their 3000Mb service ahead of time as still got time on my contract. For a start it's interesting they sell it as 3000Mb which in the real world means 2.93Gb not 3Gb. This is despite the CFL plan page saying 3 Gbps (3,000 Mbps) which is nonsense. So do you know what's the actual limit of this connection? It is 3000Mb or 3Gb?

Secondly I see that for this service they seem to use a combined ONT + Router (the Technicolor FGA 5330 multi-gigabit router) with a SC APC optical connector (which I presume plugs directly to the line drop) and a 10GbE RJ45 port. Does anyone know if you can configure the Technicolor router in "bridge" mode so that you can use your own router and get the WAN IP assigned to your own router?

MiByPvyY_o.png
 
OK did some research on my own. Technicolor is now called Vantiva and their HQs are in France which is good if you mistrust China. I couldn't find much info on the Technicolor FGA 5330 router but it appears this flat design is a newer version of an older tower like router. This FCC report for the "Technicolor FGA 5330 router" (tower version) has pictures showing a WAN red port indicating users to connect this to the their ISP access device. It also seems that this device is being sold by Google Fibre as the GFRG300. A little more digging and it seems that Google Fibre started supporting bridge mode about a year ago. However there are some issues with how you connect to the 10GbE port as it seems the Google Fibre router was forcing the 10GbE to sync at 2.5Gb speeds as they sell a 2Gb down/1Gb up service so there was no point in syncing the port at 10Gb. That wouldn't work for CFL as a 2.5Gb port will restrict the 3Gb or even the 3000Mb service.
 
Already enjoying CFL 920Mb plan and thinking in their 3000Mb service ahead of time as still got time on my contract. For a start it's interesting they sell it as 3000Mb which in the real world means 2.93Gb not 3Gb. This is despite the CFL plan page saying 3 Gbps (3,000 Mbps) which is nonsense. So do you know what's the actual limit of this connection? It is 3000Mb or 3Gb?
Sorry, I can't get my head around this, where are you getting the 2.93 number from?

The 9xx number that is often sold around gigabit plans is usually just an account for overheads. It's a gigabit (1000 Mbps, same thing), but you're not going to see that in a test because those tests have those overheads too.

Google Fibre router was forcing the 10GbE to sync at 2.5Gb speeds
Yes, that simply won't be the case here, even Community Fibre's FAQ says 10 GbE. I guess it'd be good to know if that port supports 2.5/5 Gbps syncing though because that's not a given.

the 3Gb or even the 3000Mb service
Again, it's the same thing.
 
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OK I think I got confused, you only divide by 1024 when it's storage and memory since they binary stored so power of 2. I guess for bandwidth it doesn't apply as you could transfer bits in non-power of 2 multiples...
 
Ah okay we are talking the difference between units. That’s not the case here. 1 Gbit is a gigabit not a gibibit (actually I don’t think that’s even a valid unit)

1 Gigabit is 1,000 Megabit exactly (they’re SI multipliers)
 
Interestingly i couldn't find an image for the Technicolor FGA 5330 multi-gigabit router. The image you used above is for the Zyxel AX7501 multi-gigabit router which they use/used for 3 gig connections.
 
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Interestingly i couldn't find an image for the Technicolor FGA 5330 multi-gigabit router. The image you used above is for the Zyxel AX7501 multi-gigabit router which they use/used for 3 gig connections.
Ah thanks, explains why I thought there was two versions. So the tower version is the Technicolor FGA 5330 and the image one is for Zyxel AX7501. Thanks
 
Found a manual of the Zyxel AX7501 here (model is EX5501-B0/AX7501-B0/PX7501-B0) and it does indeed support bridge mode:

"Select Bridge when your ISP provides you more than one IP address and you want the connected computers to get individual IP address from ISP's DHCP server directly. If you select Bridge, you cannot use routing functions, such as QoS, Firewall, DHCP server and NAT on traffic from the
selected LAN port (s)
"

It also seems that an ONT is still needed: "The FIBER port is connected to the ISP's ONT and the Zyxel Device is receiving optical signals normally".

But then again if you have an ONT then you could connect your router directly to it. So I presume the ONT for 3Gb+ connections uses a fibre output rather than a gigabit RJ45.
 
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But then again if you have an ONT then you could connect your router directly to it. So I presume the ONT for 3Gb+ connections uses a fibre output rather than a gigabit RJ45.
So I checked this and I guess it will depend on which ONT CFL installs and my guess will be that they don't give you a choice. I have the ADTRAN SDX 621i. I checked on ADTRAN's website and these are the models they have. The SDX 621 (no i) is 10GbE RJ45 but they also have other models like the SDX 602x which is 10GbE SFP+.

Screenshot 2023-03-19 at 10.30.54 pm.png
 
Optical for short distance would make no sense so it's possible I've misunderstood something about the fiber port as I assume people put routers as near the ONT as possible in the common cases. SFP+/10 GbE covers at low cost.

Interesting article but do note they are talking about DAC cables not regular copper cables. The difference is marginal (360ps, 7.2%). Fibre has many advantages over copper. If you are linking multiple buildings you should always use fibre at some point to prevent from the delta in static electricity from discharging. My understanding is also that fibre takes much less power and compute to switch, so if you look at equivalent switches you will see that 10GbE SFP+ switches are cheaper than 10GbE RJ45 variants at same number of ports. You also tend to see less switches with 10GbE RJ45 ports than 10GbE RJ45 and when they have 10GbE RJ45 they tend to be a few not that many.
 
If you look at the Mikrotik Switch lineup for instance you can see what I am talking about. The cheapest 10G switch with more than 4 10GbE ports is the CRS317-1G-16S+RM for $499 and you get 16x 10GbE SFP+ ports. For $599 the CRS326-24S+2Q+RM gives you 24x 10GbE SFP+ ports and 2x 40 Gb QSFP+ ports. You have to spend $699 for the CRS312-4C+8XG-RM to get 12x 10GbE RJ45 ports, with 4 being combos. And that's as far as Mikrotik goes in terms of 10GbE RJ45 ports switches.

The cheapest 24x 10GbE RJ45 ports switch I can find in Broadbandbuyer is the D-Link DXS-1210-28T which costs £2100.

https://www.broadbandbuyer.com/store/gigabit-switches/?t=1286,1302#content

So my point being is that obviously in consumer devices even 1 additional RJ45 10GbE port matters. That's why you see limited 10GbE ports and a lot of of 2.5GbE ports. At some point chips will become advanced enough to be able to switch 10GbE with ease but at the moment it does require significant compute.
 
So I checked this and I guess it will depend on which ONT CFL installs and my guess will be that they don't give you a choice. I have the ADTRAN SDX 621i. I checked on ADTRAN's website and these are the models they have. The SDX 621 (no i) is 10GbE RJ45 but they also have other models like the SDX 602x which is 10GbE SFP+.

View attachment 5657
This help page confirms CFL supply both the 621X and the 602X:

https://communityfibre.zendesk.com/...6531437-No-Internet-Self-Help-Troubleshooting

The 602X has a SPF+ 10GbE LAN port and the 621X has a RJ45 10GbE LAN port.
 
10GBase-T interfaces (RJ45 10GbE) are quite pricey and power hungry so best to avoid if there's a better option.
 
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Already enjoying CFL 920Mb plan and thinking in their 3000Mb service ahead of time as still got time on my contract. For a start it's interesting they sell it as 3000Mb which in the real world means 2.93Gb not 3Gb.
No, 3 gigabits per second and 3000 megabits per second are both exactly 3,000,000,000 bits per second.

All comms speeds are in powers of ten (e.g. 64kbps = 64,000 bits per second). The exception would be legacy telephony-based standards like an E1 trunk, which has 32 x 64,000 bits channels, of which 30 are usable: hence a "2 meg" E1 is 2,048,000 bits per second, of which 1,920,000 bits per second are usable.

RAM sizes are in powers of two: 1 GiB = 1024^3 bytes. To avoid confusion there are ugly names for this: one "gibibyte" rather than "gigabyte", and one "mebibyte" rather than "megabyte". 1024 bytes is one "kibibyte", which sounds like a kind of dogfood :)

These days, disk drive sizes are in powers of ten, because it makes the manufacturers numbers look better.

In the old days of floppy disks, it was mixed: a "1.44MB" floppy was actually 1,440 KiB, or 1.44*1000*1024 = 1,474,560 bytes.

The worst problem these days is with sizes of files and filesystems: it varies whether the OS reports them as powers of two or powers of ten.
 
The post is regarding "10GBase-T RJ45 SFP+ transceivers" and is not a comparison of 10GBASE-T to SFP+ done sanely (you're not going to fully populate a SFP+ switch with RJ45 transceivers).
No, of course not. But it's meant to show the complexity of converting signals between SFP and RJ45. Even so the complexity of sending data over 10GbE RJ45 hence why switches are so expensive.
 
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