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best effort speed increase?

greytop1

Casual Member
Has anybody recently encountered a speed increase on their connection?

my speed seems to have gone from 60kb/s (best effort ) to 75kb/s (best effort ).

good stuff eh :)
 

iceice

Member
I noticed an increase this morning to around 75kb/s. I hadn't downloaded anything over the weekend.

However, after about 200MB I'm back to 60kb/s max.
 

WD40

ULTIMATE Member
Sun Spots I reckon after a hot weekend... :laugh:
 

iceice

Member
Since yesterday, I'm now seem to be getting consistent 'best effort' speed of 75KB/s. :eek:

How long will it last ?
 

nathans

Top Member
With all these adsl exchanges going live per week and 99.8% reach for 512kbps and 96% for 1Mbps per exchange from 6th sep what do you expect lol

Apparently adsl connections are running at 6000 per day
 

micronet

ISP Rep
The 99.8% reach for ADSL is actually rather misleading, it apply's to more congested areas where the telephone exchanges are near to all the areas that they feed, other more spread out, rural areas the percentage is much lower because the exchanges have to feed a larger geographical area.

Although we are aware the UK is a 'shrinking' (not obselete) market for us, and the new services that we are going to offer reflects this.

The best effort increase reflects the speed capacity available on the satellite.
 

nathans

Top Member
I dont think the areas are congested as you say considering the trial was located in three areas and this percentage is a result of the three trials, remember it wasnt just Milton Keynes it was Fort William and Dingwall in scotland as well. and the areas that the limits need extending to are remote in themselves, to a point where bt would have put them on another exchange if they were any further away. which is why they can give an average figure based on data from 3 exchanges.
 

micronet

ISP Rep
The physical length of the line still remains an issue, note that BT have not come out giving an exact new 'Physical' distance figure on the length of your line (i.e 6.4km rather than 6km) so it shows that the pysical distance cannot be helped, but the noise level of certain lines can now be deemed as acceptable by Bt becuase of line modding or they where simply only 'just' outside of the noise level that is now able to carry a reliable ADSL signal.

I would not be suprised if alot of customers who come on to the forum after september complain of random disconnections, but im sure the majority will be happy.

If you look at the broadband map of the UK (after extended reach) you will be suprised that the service coverage is still very 'patchy'
 

nathans

Top Member
Bt dont give out exact line length figure because the technology relies on the least amount of noise and not the length.

From sep 6th they will just enable all lines and will go through procedures for cure including free engineer visits if needed, considering that some trialists had perfectly working lines on around 100db lines while some failed below that, shows that length is not the factor but noise combined with signal to noise ratio.

Yes it will be patchy although with a 99.8% coverage they will be matching the uk's terrestrial analog broadcast coverage. and im quite sure that satellite doesnt have 100% coverage especially when you think of planning regualtions and listed buildings or some building you just cant get line of sight.
 

micronet

ISP Rep
nathans said:
Bt dont give out exact line length figure because the technology relies on the least amount of noise and not the length.

From sep 6th they will just enable all lines and will go through procedures for cure including free engineer visits if needed, considering that some trialists had perfectly working lines on around 100db lines while some failed below that, shows that length is not the factor but noise combined with signal to noise ratio.

Yes it will be patchy although with a 99.8% coverage they will be matching the uk's terrestrial analog broadcast coverage. and im quite sure that satellite doesnt have 100% coverage especially when you think of planning regualtions and listed buildings or some building you just cant get line of sight.
Well, BT have always said 6km as the distance too far, so what has changed? nothing apart a few locations on the or above the border line of the db level can now recieve the service (Slightly added on 6km distance!). The restraints of copper cables over long distances is a problem across europe, even in Germany, so BT have done nothing revolutionary here, otherwise Telecoms companys across Europe would be following thier lead.

You no way can base 99.8% on every area in the UK, it is a political statistic
because as you said it is still patchy and they and they have not said that every person too far from the exchange can now get the service, only some of them. i stongly disagree that you say length is not the factor, if you have a rural dwelling 12km from the exchange, then the signal to noise will be too great to receive the service.
 

nathans

Top Member
micronet said:
Well, BT have always said 6km as the distance too far, so what has changed? nothing apart a few locations on the or above the border line of the db level can now recieve the service (Slightly added on 6km distance!). The restraints of copper cables over long distances is a problem across europe, even in Germany, so BT have done nothing revolutionary here, otherwise Telecoms companys across Europe would be following thier lead.

You no way can base 99.8% on every area in the UK, it is a political statistic
because as you said it is still patchy and they and they have not said that every person too far from the exchange can now get the service, only some of them. i stongly disagree that you say length is not the factor, if you have a rural dwelling 12km from the exchange, then the signal to noise will be too great to receive the service.
I think you have made my point exactly in your post, it has nothing to do with distance at all which is what i have been saying all along and everything to do with line noise and the signal to noise ratio, you can have an extremely poor line 1km from your exchange and fail because of noise or you can have a very clean line 10km from your house and pass, its the noise levels and signal to noise ratio which is all that matters. BT dont care how far away you live if the numbers are right you'll get the service.

As has been described with the conclusions on the extended reach studies that internal wiring becomes more of a factor with noise as it moves from balanced twisted pair cable to standard flat core cable with extension cabling, so the provision of faceplates has helped if a connection is not possible, as well as repairing any damage to the line or changing you to a better/shorter copper pair if possible.

And correct 99.8% will not be achieved in all areas, some exchanges may actually be able to reach all 100% of customers while others dip below that, but 99.8% is a national statistic as per the television coverage, which must include people with no reception in dips and mountanous regions etc. and of course the statistics you fail to mention for your service, people who cant recieve your service due to planning restrictions, listed building, no line of site possible or other reasons.
 

micronet

ISP Rep
The longer your line is, the more the signal to noise ratio is going to affect the connection. Agreed?

how many "clean lines" do you know 10km from the exchange, on an infastructure that is as ancient as the Egyptians?? clean lines are few and far between because of sheer age of the infastructure, not to mention the "cost cutting" way that it was built (It is the same across the European infastructure)

Looks like they pulled out the magic political 99.8% statistic like a rabbit out of a hat on this one :laugh:

Distance is still a major even if they say it is not, why are developed western european countries still suffering from the limits of copper cabling?? BT have not rewritten anything here, western european nations are desperate as the UK to acheive univerasal ADSL coverage, but the copper cabling makes this almost impossible, and these new BT measure have been in place for years in those countries. So as i said, BT have not anything new here: faceplate, rewireing etc will improve the coverage undoubtly, but still will be no where near universal. All that is differant is that they will give everybody a chance to get it, but many will still find it is just not possible as they have found across the seas.

how can you say 99.8% per telivision coverage?? BT don't say exactly what they base this 99.8% staticstic on, funny enough. If they do, then i would like the quote. How can you give a percentage when BT don't know themselves exactly who will be able to recieve the service and who cannot.

If you look at the trials, many users still suffered random cut-offs while others enjoyed an uninterupted service, so in my opinion BT should release a "TRUE" percentage on a per area basis, otherwise they can simpy release percentages based on what the labour spin doctor is telling them to say.

Because don't forget, this lovely 99.8% statistic will gain Labour votes in the coming elections, as well as new shares being purchased with BT and will discourage companies as ourselves from targeting the UK market.

IDEAL.

But we know the truth. :)
 
Last edited:

nathans

Top Member
Here we go, last hope you pull out the political stance, yikes. Of course as a shareholder of eutelsat you wouldnt be trying to hold up the company...

I think i've explained myself enough as far as distance is involved as far as provided an adsl service is involved, and please get all your facts correct first not all lines have been provided over copper, some may have aluminium sections in them.

Now a straight run copper line will introduce less noise than a line that has taken an indirect route with many joins, also if sections of this line has aluminium cable then this will also reduce the quality of that section of cabling.

The statistic given as explained in my previous posts if you read them is based on the trials across three exchanges which all gave the same results, rural or city based, that 0.2% of people on the exchange couldnt receive a service, now if you know maths 100 - 0.2 = 99.8 get it now

As far as random cut offs go well even i get them ever so often as im guessing so do your customers during heavy rains, thunder storms and snowfall otherwise you would specify that in your terms and conditions that your not obliged to provide service during those periods, i know it knocks my sky tv off for 20-30 mins at a time. Every technology is effected by an event that may knock it offline, yours is weather, adsl is a noise spike, lightning or other artifact.

Now are you going to prove yourself and answer the question of what is your coverage since your having a go at BT's, if you say nothing i'll guess its lower than 99.8%
Allowing for planning restrictions, listed status, lign of sight issues your coverage is?.....
 

micronet

ISP Rep
So, 99.8% is off the off the back of 3 areas? its not a national statistic, it is a statistic based on only 3 areas in the UK! :eek:


Start talking national statistics, and satellite is officially classed as 100% coverage, (look in the broadband section of this site!) where as ASDL nobody knows the TRUE coverage percentage, for instance you have thousands of new housing devopment's equipped with optical fibre, with no broadband available down these lines (new houses are still being built with optical fibre) where do these places come into the percentage?

In terms of extended reach percentage, we recently have a few customers who called out a BT engineer many times, and the BT engineer apparently made many ajustment's as with the trial and let the customer use the service for a short time, but it was just not possible. But in other areas it will be possible.

So it is very hard to give a national statistic of ADSL when you take such things into consideration.

Look at the broadband availablity map of the UK and it is VERY PATCHY and it looks like in terms of land covered, the South of England is only 75-80%% covered, and it is a differant story in Scotland, Wales and Ireland.

We just trying to make the point, that the broadband availability is still not 'universal', which is a misleading comment made by much of the press.
 

nathans

Top Member
I think you will most people these days find out national data by taking a sample group across different areas, and correlating that to population data. I've not exactly had someone knocking at my door to ask me if i can recieve tv, radio, dab, ever.

As far as satellite being 100% coverage well it is simply not, i dont care what it says on here they are wrong too, plenty of councils have restrictions on dishes, where cable tv is installed, where the property is listed status, where it is an enviromental conservation area, where you simply cant find a suitable point to place the dish to recieve the signal, where you can't get lign of sight for trees or buildings in the way. should i go on. Ok you may not know the true coverage of satellite but there is no way on earth it is 100% with all the factors above and i cant see how you can dispute that.

Now you want to look at current broadband coverage well in the southeast the lowest household coverage figure for the south is southwest witch is 85.2% coverage, southeast is 95.8% coverage, ireland has 78.8% coverage, wales has 81.1% and scotland also has 81.1%. of course these should rise with the limits changing and continue to rise as the build program continues as well until next summer when the build program is complete.

Information from www.bt.com/broadband
 
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