Sponsored

Freeview Com7 multiplex closes down 30th June 2022 to make room for 5G band 28

Lucian

ULTIMATE Member
Oh ffs. I like my TV Freeview.
Don't like having to use apps to watch TV.
Radio/fm/etc is superior to internet when it comes to broadcasts.
Hope they will allocate more freqs for freeview.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bon

meritez

ULTIMATE Member
Oh ffs. I like my TV Freeview.
Don't like having to use apps to watch TV.
Radio/fm/etc is superior to internet when it comes to broadcasts.
Hope they will allocate more freqs for freeview.
BBC Four, BBC news, cbeebies, quest, QVC, forces TV.

They are expecting smaller broadcasters to switch to streaming services
 

Norfolk&Signal

Casual Member
Oh ffs. I like my TV Freeview.
Don't like having to use apps to watch TV.
Radio/fm/etc is superior to internet when it comes to broadcasts.
Hope they will allocate more freqs for freeview.
I use Freesat - my old Sky dish but without any monthly costs.
I use TvHeadend software on Linux and DVB-S tuner cards / USB dongles on an old PC and a Raspberry Pi to receive/record FreeSat (because I'm an IT geek) but decent Freesat set top boxes are available and PVRs.
Much better than faffing around with retuning Freeview terrestrial reception all the time although I have Freeview and some DVB-T2 tuner cards as a backup or when I want to record/view lots of channels at once.

Freeview reception was never great for me as I have a 30+ yr old pre-digital TV aerial on the roof so Freesat was a gamechanger.

Secondhand Sky dish on eBay or FB Marketplace for £peanuts and a set top box or a home-made "TVHeadend" system and you're cooking!
 

Pheasant

ULTIMATE Member
BBC Four, BBC news, cbeebies, quest, QVC, forces TV.

They are expecting smaller broadcasters to switch to streaming services
We’re told “linear TV”, a funky marketing term for regular TV (be that free to air, satellite or cable) is generally in ‘structural decline’. It’s all gone streaming…

At the same time streaming service are in a tizzy as their seemingly every upwards quarterly revenues hit a speed bump in the road as folks realise there’s now so many streaming services to choose from that they don’t know which ones to keep or chop as global cost of living crises spiral out of control…

Meanwhile CNN+ in the states, brand new steaming service, which cost several hundred million dollars to setup, folds after going for only a month!

World’s gone utterly mad.
 

Lucian

ULTIMATE Member
I use Freesat - my old Sky dish but without any monthly costs.
I use TvHeadend software on Linux and DVB-S tuner cards / USB dongles on an old PC and a Raspberry Pi to receive/record FreeSat (because I'm an IT geek) but decent Freesat set top boxes are available and PVRs.
Much better than faffing around with retuning Freeview terrestrial reception all the time although I have Freeview and some DVB-T2 tuner cards as a backup or when I want to record/view lots of channels at once.

Freeview reception was never great for me as I have a 30+ yr old pre-digital TV aerial on the roof so Freesat was a gamechanger.

Secondhand Sky dish on eBay or FB Marketplace for £peanuts and a set top box or a home-made "TVHeadend" system and you're cooking!
I'll check how feasible this is.
I already use tvheadend +rpi+dvb-hat for my TV needs.
 

ewanmclean2005

Pro Member
The concept of broadcast television is starting to die with younger generations. I find more value in streaming services and it’s inevitable that while some broadcast television will still be available… it won’t be the main way that people consume content anymore.

I used to be a Virgin TV customer, paying about an extra £30 a month but cut the chord to save myself money. I moved to streaming as it’s much cheaper and overall has better content.

I had no idea that 700mhz was still being used for broadcast television. I think eventually almost all UHF bands will be utilised for mobile broadband services. The US MNOs has L600 mobile broadband services and I reckon give it a couple of years. Eventually 600mhz will be cleared for mobile broadband too.
 

JitteryPinger

ULTIMATE Member
Hope they will allocate more freqs for freeview.
Likely the opposit...

My personal thoughts are that only 1 or 2 multiplexes will exist in future at lowest end of the spectrum and eventually probably be phased out all together.

Would also expect alot of transmitting kit to be taken down and/or replaced.

I know in my part of the country alot of sub-transmitters are still online but not really necessary as the users beyond them can also pickup the tranmissions (even on higher frequencies) just fine without need to reposition aerials.
 

Lucian

ULTIMATE Member
Likely the opposit...

My personal thoughts are that only 1 or 2 multiplexes will exist in future at lowest end of the spectrum and eventually probably be phased out all together.

Would also expect alot of transmitting kit to be taken down and/or replaced.

I know in my part of the country alot of sub-transmitters are still online but not really necessary as the users beyond them can also pickup the tranmissions (even on higher frequencies) just fine without need to reposition aerials.
A shame. Radio/tv broadcasts scale in ways "Internet" can't - of course, you can't track it, which I guess is one of the primary drives behind obsoleting it.
 

eccles

ULTIMATE Member
There is scope in future for better compression. Broadcast TS still uses x264 mp4. x265 has the potential to halve data rate and I would guess that most smart TVs can handle it. If SD remained the same x264 to cater for those with older TVs, the number of HD muxes could be halved with no loss of content.
 

Norfolk&Signal

Casual Member
I'll check how feasible this is.
I already use tvheadend +rpi+dvb-hat for my TV needs.
I have about 20 Pi or other SBCs deployed around the place. Fantastic bits of kit.
I managed to find some relatively inexpensive USB DVB-S2 adapters that work well with the Pi. They have external power supply for the dish. I've had one of these running faultlessly 24/7/365 since the end of 2017 alongside an old Dell PC with a PCIe card and twin DVB-S2 tuners.

I think I actually prefer the Pi based setup as it's low power and low cost. I use a Raspberry Pi 3A+ but I reckon even the new Pi Zero 2W should be capable enough.

Here's my kit ...

For the Raspberry Pi (via USB) : -

Hauppauge PCTV DVB-S2 Stick 461e (USB tuner, Pi compatible) £93/88 currently (was £79.99 when I bought it back in 2017)


For the cheap secondhand i5 Dell PC :-

DVB Sky S952 v3 PCIe card with 2x DVB-S2 (twin tuner) - currently unavailable from the supplier I used in November 2017 when I paid only £64.90 for it

 
Top
Promotion
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £17.99
    Speed 33Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Shell Energy £19.99
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • NOW £20.00
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Virgin Media £20.00
    Speed 54Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £22.00
    Speed 38Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Large Availability | View All
Cheapest Ultrafast ISPs
  • Gigaclear £17.00
    Speed: 200Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Community Fibre £20.00
    Speed: 150Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Hyperoptic £22.00
    Speed: 158Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Virgin Media £24.00
    Speed: 108Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £25.00
    Speed: 100Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Large Availability | View All
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Promotion
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. FTTP (4110)
  2. BT (3149)
  3. Politics (2115)
  4. Building Digital UK (2024)
  5. Openreach (1968)
  6. FTTC (1922)
  7. Business (1831)
  8. Mobile Broadband (1605)
  9. Statistics (1509)
  10. 4G (1378)
  11. FTTH (1371)
  12. Virgin Media (1277)
  13. Ofcom Regulation (1241)
  14. Wireless Internet (1233)
  15. Fibre Optic (1232)
  16. Vodafone (926)
  17. EE (905)
  18. 5G (898)
  19. TalkTalk (821)
  20. Sky Broadband (787)
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms  ,  Privacy and Cookie Policy  ,  Links  ,  Website Rules