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FTTP advertised to homes served by a non fibre exchange - how does this work?

Some homes near me are getting BT fibre installed, but are served by a non fibre exchange (SamKnows shows it having nothing beyond ADSL). Interestingly, it seems to be only a small number of homes it is available to, and they're all on the main road in to Mersea Island, which has its own exchange. Is it possible that FTTP can now be spurred off of the main exchange backbone network?

The exchange is Peldon and a postcode where this is offered is CO5 7LE - looks like any of the handful of houses that come up on the BT checker are on this road and all have FTTP available.

The road in question is the direct route to the West Mersea exchange, which has FTTC available.

It seems there is some "other" way of providing BT fibre now that I'm not aware of. Anyone know how this works?
 
Last edited:

Meatball

Top Member
ADSL is restricted as we know by line length so OR has always had to install equipment in the local exchange. With FTTC they had more flexibility but because of telephony connectivity they mostly co-located it again locally.

Now with the move to FTTP and removal of both the copper line and no longer providing Fibre Voice Access they now have the choice to take the fibres more centrally which is what they want to do long term.

So whether they place the OLT remotely, within the local exchange, the parent exchange or one of their longterm central centres will be presumably determined by local requirements.
 
ADSL is restricted as we know by line length so OR has always had to install equipment in the local exchange. With FTTC they had more flexibility but because of telephony connectivity they mostly co-located it again locally.

Now with the move to FTTP and removal of both the copper line and no longer providing Fibre Voice Access they now have the choice to take the fibres more centrally which is what they want to do long term.

So whether they place the OLT remotely, within the local exchange, the parent exchange or one of their longterm central centres will be presumably determined by local requirements.
That is really enlightening, thank you.

So I guess SamKnows is becoming less useful now to investigate available broadband speeds, and we have to rely on whatever behind the scenes lookups the BT site is doing?
 

Mark.J

Administrator
Staff member
ISPreview Team
Adding to what Meatball said. One of the reasons they're planning to close so many UK exchanges in the future is because they won't be needed due to fibre.

 

Badem

Casual Member
I can add some more to this, some of the new FTTP enabled areas have had Active Cabs installed with is the OLT in the field, these can connect swathes of urban areas and then in turn these connect back to a POP, this can be something as simple as a shipping container in a secure environment.
This means the exchange is totally phased out at this point, simply needed for the back haul connection into the wider network.
As MarkJ says above, this is one of the drivers behind shutting down exchanges, no longer are massive buildings needed to house the equipment, you can get an Active Cab done to the size of a normal street cab and the new POP can be situated anywhere, this in turn leads to reduced lease costs for Handover points in exchanges for the network builders and the ISPs simply need to have capacity into the new Fibre Exchanges
 

vcommsmind

Top Member
Some homes near me are getting BT fibre installed, but are served by a non fibre exchange (SamKnows shows it having nothing beyond ADSL). Interestingly, it seems to be only a small number of homes it is available to, and they're all on the main road in to Mersea Island, which has its own exchange. Is it possible that FTTP can now be spurred off of the main exchange backbone network?

The exchange is Peldon and a postcode where this is offered is CO5 7LE - looks like any of the handful of houses that come up on the BT checker are on this road and all have FTTP available.

The road in question is the direct route to the West Mersea exchange, which has FTTC available.

It seems there is some "other" way of providing BT fibre now that I'm not aware of. Anyone know how this works?

Other answers are on the right lines but also worthing pointing out that Sam ... well doesn't know. Sam Knows is years out of date now.
 
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