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IPv6 (again)

macklij

Regular Member
I thought I'd have a play with IPv6 on my 1Gb GGNAT connection. Up until now, I have left IPv6 off on both the WAN and LAN sides of my Draytek router. Before enabling IPv6 I had a very healthy 945Mbit symmetric with a 1 or 2mS ping.

Enabling IPv6 with client DHCPv6 on the WAN side of my Draytek was a breeze, as was setting up the LAN side. The interesting bit is the speed tests...

With IPv6 enabled, speeds drop to 476Mbit down and 608Mbit up. Ping still 1mS. This is on Windows 10 on a pretty fast home built Intel i9. Tests came out much the same on another PC. Unticking IPv6 in the adapter setting restores full speed as above on both machines.

I thought I'd set Windows to prefer IPv4 over IPv6 (there's a registry setting). This improved matters, but not to full speed. I got about 650Mbit down and 800Mbit up with a 1mS ping.

I ended up leaving the router set up for IPv6 but turning it off on the PCs. My iPhone when near
a UniFi access point gets about 480Mb symmetric, which is about 50Mbit down on when the router was IPv4 only.

I am wondering what is going on. My ideas include:
1. The Draytek just isn't fast with IPv6 traffic (unlikely, because its not NATing the IPv6).
2. Community Fibre isn't as fast with IPv6 because of the way it's routed, especially with IPv4 CGNAT in the picture.
3. Windows 10 is slow with IPv6 (but the internet doesn't turn up loads on this, which it would if it were true).

Not a desperate issue, but I just wanted it there in case I ever want to run something that I want available out on t'Internet which of course CGNAT prevents without VPNs etc.

Any thoughts appreciated. Thanks.
 
I don't see any real difference between speeds on IPv6 or 4 on Windows PCs, this is on a 1Gig Openreach line, and using pfSense. I don't think this is a Windows issue.

It is possible the Draytek might be slower on IPv6 depending on the SoC, as with IPv4 it might be mostly, or all, hardware accelerated but IPv6 could be routed via software. They might say in the specifications for your model what it should do with hardware enabled and disabled. It might also be whatever Community Fibre use for their IPv6 routing isn't as fast?

Odd one.
 
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@macklij

I’ve an older Draytek and I’m somewhat suspicious of the IPv6 implementation.

The only thing I use is a response to the WAN for ping but that seems to be very variable in delay (producing a Think Broadband plot with plenty of yellow). I also have IPv6 packet loss but that seems common to others.

I like the Draytek range but I’m wondering if I should wait for the next generation of 29xx products to come out with more capable hardware. No hints of that yet however.
 
You say "the DrayTek", the DrayTek what? What's the model number?
It's a 2866

When I get a serious chunk of time I could try and configure a Juniper SRX340. They're power hungry and noisy beasts though, so wouldn't be using full-time.
 
@macklij

I’ve an older Draytek and I’m somewhat suspicious of the IPv6 implementation.

The only thing I use is a response to the WAN for ping but that seems to be very variable in delay (producing a Think Broadband plot with plenty of yellow). I also have IPv6 packet loss but that seems common to others.

I like the Draytek range but I’m wondering if I should wait for the next generation of 29xx products to come out with more capable hardware. No hints of that yet however.
Thanks.

I'm mixed on DrayTek - they seem stable but they can be a bit eccentric in terms of terminology and setup. Having said that they are definitely better than most Soho stuff.

The packet loss is an interesting observation - if significant it could slow things down. I'll check to see if the Think Broadband monitor can be set to IPv6 only and give it a go - after the sunny weekend perhaps.
 
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I don't see any real difference between speeds on IPv6 or 4 on Windows PCs, this is on a 1Gig Openreach line, and using pfSense. I don't think this is a Windows issue.

It is possible the Draytek might be slower on IPv6 depending on the SoC, as with IPv4 it might be mostly, or all, hardware accelerated but IPv6 could be routed via software. They might say in the specifications for your model what it should do with hardware enabled and disabled. It might also be whatever Community Fibre use for their IPv6 routing isn't as fast?

Odd one.
Thanks. I think the hardware acceleration is a very good point. The specs don't really give throughput for non-NAT traffic, just marvellous figures for hardware accelerated NAT.
 
It's a 2866

When I get a serious chunk of time I could try and configure a Juniper SRX340. They're power hungry and noisy beasts though, so wouldn't be using full-time.
In case it's of interest I got full 900Mb speeds on this model of Draytek w/IPv6 when I tested some time back. Not CF though but Toob.
 
as with IPv4 it might be mostly, or all, hardware accelerated but IPv6 could be routed via software.
NAT is just a firewall rule, handled by the router CPU just like other IPv4 or IPv6 firewall rules.

Decent vendors quote throughput figures for a certain number of filter rules..

eg.

Screenshot_20231006_172859.png
 
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How were you running your speed test? Was the test run with IPv4 going to the exact same endpoint as IPv6? Are you comparing apples with apples?
 
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How were you running your speed test? Was the test run with IPv4 going to the exact same endpoint as IPv6? Are you comparing apples with apples?
As best I could yes. Disabled IPv4 and IPv6 appropriately in the NIC settings and used ThinkBroadbands IPv6 test and IPv4 test

http://labs.thinkbroadband.com/speedtest/index.php?site=deltaEUEIJEui2u2je

 
You can't completely disable IPv4 on a windows 10 or 11 machine, unlike Linux or MacOS

All you can do is modify the precedence of IPv4 over IPv6 via registry mods

 
@HairyLeg

I'm really sorry to say, but I'm not sure why you are posting this stuff. For me it just seems to be adding noise to the thread.

NAT is more than a firewall rule - it's address translation, re-writing header addresses and maintaining a table of information of sources/destinations etc. This has a processing overhead. Some DrayTeks offer hardware acceleration for NAT and IPSec.

In Windows you can turn off IPv4 and IPv6 on each NIC. When IPv4 is disabled and IPv6 is enabled, no IPv4 traffic is passed over the NIC.

I'm not sure what the screenshot or the Facebook video is trying to add.
 
NAT is more than a firewall rule - it's address translation, re-writing header addresses and maintaining a table of information of sources/destinations etc. This has a processing overhead. Some DrayTeks offer hardware acceleration for NAT and IPSec.
NAT is simply a firewall rule (IP source => masquerade rule) there is no hardware acceleration used. Firewall rules are processed by the router CPU despite what Draytek marketing may tell you.

Some routers have an additional CPU to handle IPSec encryption (Cavium is the most common chip) but that is not a NAT function and has nothing to do with routing. If it doens't have a Cavium ASIC onboard then it's processed by the CPU, just like the firewall rules

In Windows you can turn off IPv4 and IPv6 on each NIC. When IPv4 is disabled and IPv6 is enabled, no IPv4 traffic is passed over the NIC.
No you really can't turn IPv4 off on a windows box without completely borking the system. All you doing is disabling it on a NIC which is not the same thing, the kernel will still try and process IPV4.

I'm not sure what the screenshot or the Facebook video is trying to add.
It's a Youtube video and a link Facebook engineering to the data backing up the Video claims...

It's a link to Facebook presentation showing that they are seeing a better than 15% improvement in access speeds via the use of IPv6 (in 2016 no less)

Which is kind of appropriate to your main claim and experiences that IPv6 is slower.

Don't feel sorry for yourself, we can all learn new stuff every day.
 
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