Sponsored

Is there a dual sim 4g router with channel bonding / bandwidth aggregation?

kommando828

ULTIMATE Member
You will notice no difference in real life between full bonding and Draytek load balancing. The one exception is a large file that will only download in one section or session so that will be directed to one WAN, but even streams are now multi sessions. Currently this PC has 39 sessions so could use 39 Wans if that were possible. I have maxed out at 494 concurrent sessions this morning, normally it's a total of 60 at any one time.

Draytek load balancing shares the sessions out between the load balanced WAN's, in my case 2 WAN's. Later routers can do 3 and earlier more expensive ones such as the 3900 for rack mounting will do 4 load balanced WAN's but has no Wifi capability.
 

bonehead999

Casual Member
There is a significant difference between bonding and load-balancing/failover. Also have a look at multipath TCP (link below)

Bonding will actually do what the OP asked (combine the bandwidth of 2+ WAN connections). With failover the available bandwidth will never exceed the bandwidth of any single WAN connection, it will just switch between the connections if one goes down, or alternate between connections depending on clients or whatever. The only exception is when using bittorrent, where in my experience, most load-balancing routers will spread the individual the available WAN connections.

To the OP - have a look at this:
 
There is a significant difference between bonding and load-balancing/failover. Also have a look at multipath TCP (link below)

Bonding will actually do what the OP asked (combine the bandwidth of 2+ WAN connections). With failover the available bandwidth will never exceed the bandwidth of any single WAN connection, it will just switch between the connections if one goes down, or alternate between connections depending on clients or whatever. The only exception is when using bittorrent, where in my experience, most load-balancing routers will spread the individual the available WAN connections.

To the OP - have a look at this:
Yes. Agreed. Whilst load balancing is nice I need bonding / aggregation of wans. These routers exist and also do balancing of course. I am just looking for one than can do three wans via Ethernet inputs.
 

thejackson5

Member
I have a slightly different use-case, where I believe that bonding of two SIMs on the same bands/frequencies would be beneficial.

My mobile carrier offers talk/text/data plans with unlimited hotspotted data at a throttled, but still quite ample, speed. In addition, it allows you to add-on a second, data-only SIM (I only use data anyway) linked to the same line for a trivial amount per month. The two SIMs use the same pool of high-speed data, and then once that is done with, they both continue on with the unlimited throttled data. Critically, however, they both can receive the full throttled speed simultaneously — using one throttled SIM does not in any way affect the experience of the other.

Being artificially capped at a certain speed, rather than pulling all that the network can give them, and given that the throttled speed is under half of the unthrottled speed, it seems to me that buying a dual-SIM router and putting both cards within it would yield double the throttled speed, assuming that they don't have some sort of block in place where two SIMs reporting the same IMEI only get half normal throttled speeds. Am I correct to think that this might work? If so, are there any consumer-grade dual-SIM LTE routers I could use to achieve this?

Cheers!
 

Buggerlugz

ULTIMATE Member
I have a slightly different use-case, where I believe that bonding of two SIMs on the same bands/frequencies would be beneficial.

My mobile carrier offers talk/text/data plans with unlimited hotspotted data at a throttled, but still quite ample, speed. In addition, it allows you to add-on a second, data-only SIM (I only use data anyway) linked to the same line for a trivial amount per month. The two SIMs use the same pool of high-speed data, and then once that is done with, they both continue on with the unlimited throttled data. Critically, however, they both can receive the full throttled speed simultaneously — using one throttled SIM does not in any way affect the experience of the other.

Being artificially capped at a certain speed, rather than pulling all that the network can give them, and given that the throttled speed is under half of the unthrottled speed, it seems to me that buying a dual-SIM router and putting both cards within it would yield double the throttled speed, assuming that they don't have some sort of block in place where two SIMs reporting the same IMEI only get half normal throttled speeds. Am I correct to think that this might work? If so, are there any consumer-grade dual-SIM LTE routers I could use to achieve this?

Cheers!
Which will work, only if your local mast isn't over contended.
 

Bubblesthefish6

ULTIMATE Member
Hi all,

I'm moving down to rural devon the the FTTP has just been put back by 6 months so I've got to find a solution for short term internet. I've tested out a 4G modem down there with vodaphone and predicatably, first thing in the morning its nice and quick (30MBps) but as people wake up on the campsites etc it drops to nothing (05-2MBps)

Both vodaphone, EE and O2 have decent 4G coverage

From what I understand, your recommendation would be to buy a Draytek Vigor 2925 and use that to link two 4G modems. If I understand correctly I could use one simple USB dongle and one via the WAN port (and a 4G box with an ethernet cable). Does that sound about right?

I'll be using a Mac, is there much configuration at that end? Or you just connect as usual to the Draytek (wired or wireless) and get on with it?
The Draytek will manage the flow of different connections to the fastest 4G at the time? If you are doing 2 things at once, e.g. Dropbox and websearch, does it split the connection across the two?

I'm quite the networking noob, so feel free to point me to a big reading guide to get up speed on the differences between bonding and load balancing.

Thanks and any help,

NIck
 
Top
Promotion
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Vodafone £19.50 (*22.50)
    Speed 38Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • NOW £20.00 (*32.00)
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Hyperoptic £20.00 (*25.00)
    Speed 50Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Promo Code: ROKUGIFT
  • TalkTalk £21.00 (*29.95)
    Speed 38Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Shell Energy £21.99 (*30.99)
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Large Availability | View All
Cheapest Ultrafast ISPs
  • Vodafone £23.50 (*26.50)
    Speed: 100Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Gigaclear £24.00 (*49.00)
    Speed: 300Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Hyperoptic £25.00 (*35.00)
    Speed: 150Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Promo Code: ROKUGIFT
  • Community Fibre £27.50 (*32.50)
    Speed: 200Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: First 6 Months Free
  • Virgin Media £28.00 (*52.00)
    Speed: 108Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Large Availability | View All
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Promotion
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. FTTP (3670)
  2. BT (3044)
  3. Politics (1975)
  4. Building Digital UK (1945)
  5. FTTC (1897)
  6. Openreach (1862)
  7. Business (1717)
  8. Mobile Broadband (1501)
  9. Statistics (1430)
  10. FTTH (1367)
  11. 4G (1295)
  12. Virgin Media (1197)
  13. Fibre Optic (1184)
  14. Wireless Internet (1176)
  15. Ofcom Regulation (1167)
  16. Vodafone (859)
  17. EE (845)
  18. 5G (792)
  19. TalkTalk (781)
  20. Sky Broadband (757)
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms  ,  Privacy and Cookie Policy  ,  Links  ,  Website Rules