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Migrate landline to digital

Johnmcl7

Regular Member
I would go for a Fritzbox 7530, it has two analogue phone ports plus built-in DECT basestation for up to six handsets. Also, you get dual band wifi and a lot of other features. You get one thrown in with Zen Internet or second hand on eBay from £40 onwards.

I have been using a 7270 for years and upgraded to a 7590 last year, still on ADSL2+, desperately waiting for FTTP to arrive.

You could also look at the ZTE ZXHN H298A, two phone ports and support for 5 DECT handsets. They sell on eBay for around £10, might be worth a gamble.
I was initially against this idea because I felt getting as simple a device as possible would be the best approach and I didn't want another bulky router when it wasn't needed. However reading through the reviews of the Grandstream it does seem a bit and miss to get working which is my experience with similar devices at work so I am starting to lean towards the router idea
 

clivejo

Top Member
I also would recommend the Fritzbox 7530.

One of the pro's for me about this device is that it can be run on 12VDC from my UPS, so keeps comms up and running if the power goes out.

The DECT base is great as means that handsets can still connect and establish incoming or outgoing calls even if the electric is off. A lot of the other alternatives needed strange voltages!

Also got a cheap (it has a line out on the display) Fritz!Fon C5 which is very useful, I stream music and internet radio to it, even relaxing sleep background sounds while it's charging at night! Handy for call routing too (some people wonder why they always get my answer phone!)
 

clivejo

Top Member
BT number ported to them and job done? I assume once the number is with Sipgate it can be ported somewhere else?
Just check with BT. When I ported my number to sipgate, they totally cancelled my landline, basically null and void. So they might also cancel the internet service as it is registered or linked to your number!
 

Johnmcl7

Regular Member
I also would recommend the Fritzbox 7530.

One of the pro's for me about this device is that it can be run on 12VDC from my UPS, so keeps comms up and running if the power goes out.

The DECT base is great as means that handsets can still connect and establish incoming or outgoing calls even if the electric is off. A lot of the other alternatives needed strange voltages!
I'm wanting to use the Call Guardian on the existing DECT phones so unfortunately that rules out using a VOIP DECT base which makes it a little trickier.

Just check with BT. When I ported my number to sipgate, they totally cancelled my landline, basically null and void. So they might also cancel the internet service as it is registered or linked to your number!

Thanks for the warning but thankfully in my case it's more straightforward because I'm cancelling the line entirely as I now have internet through CityFibre.
 

clivejo

Top Member
I'm wanting to use the Call Guardian on the existing DECT phones so unfortunately that rules out using a VOIP DECT base which makes it a little trickier.
You could just white list all your normal contacts and send all other calls to a voicemail explaining that you are filtering calls and to leave a message with your number if you have genuine business to discuss!

But if the Call Guardian is working for you, just get a cheap VoIP gateway. I have a LinkSys PAP2T somewhere used to give reliable service. Only problem with it was it needs 5VDC to keep it running and the little buck convertor I got to power it introduced a hum to the line!
 

Essex_Man

Casual Member
Also got a cheap (it has a line out on the display) Fritz!Fon C5 which is very useful,
The Fritzboxes work well with most DECT phones, I am using a couple of Gigaset A510 but I also used some cheap DECt phones from Lidl before.

I'm wanting to use the Call Guardian on the existing DECT phones so unfortunately that rules out using a VOIP DECT base which makes it a little trickier.
With the Fritz Box, you can define all sorts of call blocks and diversions, e.g. only let calls from people in your phone book through. Not quite the same as Call Guardian but still better than nothing.

You could still keep BT for incoming calls (and keep call guardian) but migrate all your outgoing calls to VOIP. I moved all our outbound calls to VOIP (freevoipdeal) almost ten years ago and saved £££ since.
 

Johnmcl7

Regular Member
The Call Guardian works well for genuine calls that are not in the address book so prefer to stick with it.

There's no outgoing calls made on the line so the BT line rental is pricey for that, I've just decided to stick with the Grandstream 801 and will see how it goes.
 

Nomader

Pro Member
Hey all,

So just before I order the grandstream ht801 can I just check is this device the best cheapest and easiest to use/set up device for someone who is new to switching from my landline to voip?

Also once I have configured the device with the settings provided by sipgate which I found here: https://basichelp.sipgate.co.uk/hc/en-gb/articles/204237381-Grandstream-HT-Adapters

Do I need to change any other settings or add setting for this device. As I read somewhere someone mentioning to make sure the port forwarding is also set up right( not sure what that is). Or it can cause issues??. As far as I can see as long as I have followed the instructions on the link above from grandstream then am all good to go? I have so far only signed to the free account from sipgate. Waiting for the document in the post they are sending to me.

Also do I need to get a BT to RJ11 plug convertor and/or RJ11 "crossover" cable for a my phone?

Finally I have features on my landline such as caller display and anonymous call rejection call blocking features for certain numbers currently. Do I have similar options available to me when I make the switch to sipgate etc.

Sorry for all the questions just want to cover everything before I switch.

Thank you
 

shevans

Regular Member
I moved my BT line to AAISP and whilst I had a Fritzbox I went with the Gigaset N300 base and A540H handsets also from AAISP. I did this knowing that they would be able to make it work and support me as well as ensuring my phone number was successfully ported.

With AAISP I have caller ID and they have blocked a few incoming numbers for me manually.
 

Phil2021

Regular Member
Hey all,

So just before I order the grandstream ht801 can I just check is this device the best cheapest and easiest to use/set up device for someone who is new to switching from my landline to voip?

Also once I have configured the device with the settings provided by sipgate which I found here: https://basichelp.sipgate.co.uk/hc/en-gb/articles/204237381-Grandstream-HT-Adapters

Do I need to change any other settings or add setting for this device. As I read somewhere someone mentioning to make sure the port forwarding is also set up right( not sure what that is). Or it can cause issues??. As far as I can see as long as I have followed the instructions on the link above from grandstream then am all good to go? I have so far only signed to the free account from sipgate. Waiting for the document in the post they are sending to me.

Also do I need to get a BT to RJ11 plug convertor and/or RJ11 "crossover" cable for a my phone?

Finally I have features on my landline such as caller display and anonymous call rejection call blocking features for certain numbers currently. Do I have similar options available to me when I make the switch to sipgate etc.

Sorry for all the questions just want to cover everything before I switch.

Thank you

One thing to note with Sipgate is if you connect via IPv6, then you may have intermittent issues receiving calls. This is because Sipgate has several IPv6 servers, and only the original server the VoIP device connects to in order to login is allowed into the firewall to 'ring your phone'. In this case you would need to add a firewall rule to allow all traffic from Sipgate into your network. Some routers don't provide many settings to do this, just keep this in mind and pop back if you find you get callers who end up at voicemail and your phone never rang.

Sipgate provide caller ID and you can blacklist numbers on the website. Whether the caller ID will be presented correctly from the Grandstream (the Grandstream needs to take the number and encode it into a burst of data and inject that into the audio and there are different formats) to your old style phone is another question, I'm not familiar with it to know for sure. If you are using an old style phone you would need an RJ11 to BT socket adapter, usually they will include a ring capacitor in this adapter, some older phones will not ring without this, but most modern phones are okay.

Good luck.
 

Johnmcl7

Regular Member
Hey all,

So just before I order the grandstream ht801 can I just check is this device the best cheapest and easiest to use/set up device for someone who is new to switching from my landline to voip?

Also once I have configured the device with the settings provided by sipgate which I found here: https://basichelp.sipgate.co.uk/hc/en-gb/articles/204237381-Grandstream-HT-Adapters

Do I need to change any other settings or add setting for this device. As I read somewhere someone mentioning to make sure the port forwarding is also set up right( not sure what that is). Or it can cause issues??. As far as I can see as long as I have followed the instructions on the link above from grandstream then am all good to go? I have so far only signed to the free account from sipgate. Waiting for the document in the post they are sending to me.

Also do I need to get a BT to RJ11 plug convertor and/or RJ11 "crossover" cable for a my phone?

Finally I have features on my landline such as caller display and anonymous call rejection call blocking features for certain numbers currently. Do I have similar options available to me when I make the switch to sipgate etc.

Sorry for all the questions just want to cover everything before I switch.

Thank you

I think you're wanting to do the same as me, I have a set of BT8500 Trio DECT phones and now I've moved to CityFibre I want to get rid of the BT phone. I'm using the Talktalk supplied Amazon Eero Pro 6 router.

I wanted to keep the Call Guardian feature as I think it's excellent and chose the Grandstream 801 as it seemed the simplest device to do what I want and it's well supported with a lot of information out there on them.

I didn't spend long looking at RJ11 adapters and just bought this one which works fine:


After connecting the phone and powering up the GS 801 you can either use the phone to get the IP address it's been assigned or you can check your router to see what IP it's assigned which you can use to access the web interface. I then changed its IP address from DHCP to a static address as recommended.

I then configured the device using the guide you've linked to:


One rather stupid mistake I made which is entirely my fault is I entered the SIPgate username and password to access the account but you need to use the SIP ID and password that's shown within your Sipgate page. There's a huge amount of options on the device but you just need to carefully change the settings the guide shows and you should be good, this worked for me and without setting up port forwarding on the router.

I then followed this guide to set it up for UK ringtones:


The line supports Caller ID which means the BT Call Guardian feature works fine, I tested it with a known number and it let it through and with a hidden number it went through Call Guardian.

I've not moved the BT phone number to Sipgate yet so that's the next step.
 

Tony Gamble

Regular Member
Forgive me if my question has been answered already but I suspect not.

BT want to migrate me to VOIP and I am happy to stay with them for my landline and broadband.

The BT router is in a corridor next to the socket where the copper comes into our apartment. They picked that socket as it is the strongest signal.

I have a Panasonic KX-TGH264E DECT cordless system and the hub is in our living room. I can't move the hub as it uses bluetooth to connect with our two cellphones which we keep on our desks. That means that not only does it circulate calls from our landline but if either of our cellphones is called it picks them up and shares it across the five handsets dotted around our home.

I cannot move the DECT hub so it is next to the BT router as it would then be too far away from the cellphones for the bluetooth to work.

I am getting conflicting advice about ATA devices.

Someone has just told me that BT can place one next to their router and get it to feed an analogue signal back into the phone wiring so the DECT can remain in the living room socket.

Someone else has said this is not possible and the DECT hub must be hard wired into the ATA device.

Can some good souls in this forum tell me which answer is correct, please?

Tony
London UK
 

Meatball

ULTIMATE Member
Please be aware of https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.p...-voice-rollout-after-consumer-complaints.html
It is not clear whether BT Consumer are changing their technical approach or just reaffirming guidance/processes.

I assume your Router is located on the incoming master socket and is powered. Therefore presumably where OR can install the ONT. You may be able to use the existing router or BT will supply a replacement.

New BT routers include a DECT base and may offer free DECT handsets.

However there is no reason why people cannot use their existing house wiring and equipment. Especially those like you that have extra facilities which meet your needs.

The OR FTTP install should include "carry out Voice Re-injection Installation (VRI), which uses existing internal wiring to make use of traditional telephones." Therefore I would request this from the ISP and insist the installer does it whether VoIP or FVA.

If not then the simplest DIY solution post FTTP install for BT (or Sky or other offering a phone socket) is to remove or disconnect the incoming OR line from the first socket (OR should do this) and connect the Router to that socket using a lead with a male phone connector at both ends as attached. This would extend the ATA functionality of the router to your house wiring and hence to your KX-TGH264E and any other corded phones.

The only issue is that there may be a possible interference issue between the DECT units if the BT Router DECT is not turned off.

If you are not going to use the BT functionality then perhaps BT may not be the best ISP for you.
 

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Tony Gamble

Regular Member
Thanks Meatball. Progress !!

"I assume your Router is located on the incoming master socket and is powered." Yes and yes.

Could you be kind enough to explain the abbreviations OR, ONT and FVA?

"The only issue is that there may be a possible interference issue between the DECT units if the BT Router DECT is not turned off." Well I certainly will not be using it so hopefully someone will know how to turn it off.

"If you are not going to use the BT functionality then perhaps BT may not be the best ISP for you."

I will not be using any functionality other than a broadband feed and incoming calls on a landline number that we have had for thirty years. Up to now both have been reliable and the price for the new two year contract seems to have gone down rather than up. I will not be at all popular if I migrate to a system that repeatedly fails. My wife is overtly non techie which is why I bought her a Non-Smart phone and why it spends all its time on her desk if she is not out of our home.

What I have with the DECT handling cellphones is apparently unusual. My broadband is circulated round our home with Devolo plug devices. It seems to work so I follow the formula of 'if it ain't broke.......'

Tony
 

Meatball

ULTIMATE Member
There are no FVA installs any more, since about 2018 or 2019. It will definitely be VoIP into the router (on an ATA port or DECT)
Yep but you never know it could make a comeback (resilience etc). With the BT pause we simply don't know. FVA and BBU might be preferable in very rural with the telephony taken back to central OR handover point to consolidate and connect to VoIP.

Just highlighting that the solution of Voice Re-injection also works on FVA, VM etc. People do not need to discard internal telephone wiring or equipment and only need new if they wish to or a special compatibility required.
 

Meatball

ULTIMATE Member
ONT - Optical Modem that talks to the fibre network. It then connects to the Router WAN socket using an ethernet data cable.

OR - Openreach the BT division that maintains the external network providing an open network wholesale service to ISPs (BT and hundreds of others).

FVA - Fibre Voice Network. Not currently being installed but the ONT can provide a Voice Service (telephone socket) and ATA over the fibre network. Previously this was just to the local exchange but there is no reason why this can't be taken centrally and interfaced with the VoIP network. In new developments previously the ONT came with a Battery Backup which could maintain the Voice line if you had a power failure.

Using your mobiles for outgoing and just using the landline for incoming is becoming rare now but excellent. Even BT's landline is reasonable without any call plan. Its just that BT is becoming very proprietary, creates dependencies and charges accordingly. If you have a VoIP (Digital Voice) line with BT my understanding is that the DECT remains on.

The alternative is Sky as there is no DECT conflict but still has a secure, quality and fixed location VoIP solution.

Vodafone do not appear to mention injection to home wiring and the solution would need an RJ11 to telephone plug lead instead.
 

Phil2021

Regular Member
The only issue is that there may be a possible interference issue between the DECT units if the BT Router DECT is not turned off.

If you are not going to use the BT functionality then perhaps BT may not be the best ISP for you.

DECT base stations will not interfere with each other as they are designed to work in congested settings and will simply sort themselves out to work on different frequencies.

From the Wiki page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_enhanced_cordless_telecommunications
"DECT performs with fidelity in common congested domestic radio traffic situations. It is generally immune to interference from other DECT systems, Wi-Fi networks, video senders, Bluetooth technology, baby monitors and other wireless devices."

Hope that helps.
 

Tony Gamble

Regular Member
Thanks again Meatball and thanks Phil about DECT.

It really sounds quite challenging to be sure that the installer knows what he needs to do. I cannot get the BT man who phoned me to renew my contract to write me an email explaining what he said on the phone.

You use phrases like "Therefore I would request this from the ISP and insist the installer does it whether VoIP or FVA.". If they won't write an email to support a renewal of contract I worry about requesting and insisting!

I need to read your first email again and work out what I need to 'request'. I'll do it tomorrow with a clear brain.

Tony
 

Meatball

ULTIMATE Member
Just say that you want "Voice Re-injection Installation (VRI), which uses existing internal wiring to make use of your existing telephones". If they do not understand I'd ask for someone who does.
 
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