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Morecambe fttp

Gingeee85

Pro Member
Green+yellow is (safety) earth colour for copper (in sparky land)
Narrow yellow stripe on (usually) black sheath indicates fibre (for public telecoms)
is that a typical telecom move? id never seen this company before, unless my eyes were playing up and it was the black cable, it was hammering it down
 

Pheasant

ULTIMATE Member
is that a typical telecom move? id never seen this company before, unless my eyes were playing up and it was the black cable, it was hammering it down
Green coloured duct is a possibility (for an Altnet not Openreach) as that is deemed colour for CATV/comms adopted by Virgin Media and lately by various AltNets to blow their fibre down. Doesn’t usually have a stripe though.

That’s not to say that green sheathed fibre isn’t a possibility. Would be quite unusual.
 

Gingeee85

Pro Member
Green coloured duct is a possibility (for an Altnet not Openreach) as that is deemed colour for CATV/comms adopted by Virgin Media and lately by various AltNets to blow their fibre down. Doesn’t usually have a stripe though.

That’s not to say that green sheathed fibre isn’t a possibility. Would be quite unusual.
where the cable was going to was the top of the alley @Junior20 has mentioned virgin are due to dig so it makes sense now
 

Junior20

Pro Member
where the cable was going to was the top of the alley @Junior20 has mentioned virgin are due to dig so it makes sense now
When did they run this cable?, I'm usually looking out of my window everyday to see progress. I must've missed it, What part of the alley?, Exchange way or Euston road way?
 

Gingeee85

Pro Member
west end road opposit battismore, to the top of euston grove next to the house a car went into, was late last night, was about 7.20 i went past, vans just literally parked on the bridge causing chaos
 

Junior20

Pro Member
Ahh i saw them, Was it virgin doing this?. There was also another company out going into ducts and sticking a massive suction tube in them, Making a lot of noise. No idea what that was about though
 

Junior20

Pro Member
Another email from Virgin today, “Our team has started work to bring lightning fast broadband to my area"
 
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ccsnet

Pro Member
Well I cant be far now... just watched 2 Morrisons engineers prep for a fibre pull underground with the old blue rope. My node is just a few feet away so I'm hoping that means really good speeds.

T
 

Gingeee85

Pro Member
Well I cant be far now... just watched 2 Morrisons engineers prep for a fibre pull underground with the old blue rope. My node is just a few feet away so I'm hoping that means really good speeds.

T
i was always under the impression fibre didnt have them sort of speed problems with distance? how long from diggin to the node going on the pole? my area starts digging work again next week on the 18th
 

ccsnet

Pro Member
i was always under the impression fibre didnt have them sort of speed problems with distance? how long from diggin to the node going on the pole? my area starts digging work again next week on the 18th
There is a drop off but no where as near as adsl etc. Point is closer to the node the better as things like distance and Bends can reduce bandwidth, plus damage can still ocure and impact the fibre.

Normally this is why fibre is tested and certified in Data Centers.

Time wise has been about three months I think (check my earlier post when I spoke to the surveryers). Your milage may vary but I can say this has been quick.

T

T
 

Pheasant

ULTIMATE Member
There is a drop off but no where as near as adsl etc. Point is closer to the node the better as things like distance and Bends can reduce bandwidth, plus damage can still ocure and impact the fibre.
Rubbish. Sorry but it is.
 

ccsnet

Pro Member
Rubbish. Sorry but it is.
When a fiber cable is bent excessively, the optical signal within the cable may refract and escape through the fiber cladding. Bending can also permanently damage the fiber by causing micro-cracks.

Granted in this use the drop off due to distance is very minor but depending on the fibre its self you can have max runs today from 150m to 1000m (OM1-5). Light does loose a little intensitiy every time it hits the side so there is a natural drop off.

Not sure whats been used here given its part of a national network and on the street.

I do wonder what these small tollerances will look like in 10,20,30 (or longer) years when even faster speeds are offered as they will not be an issue now but may be then which is why the closer the better imho.

T
 
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Pheasant

ULTIMATE Member
Granted in this use the drop off due to distance is very minor but depending on the fibre its self you can have max runs from 150m to 1000m (OM1-5). Light does loose a little intensitiy every time it hits the side so there is a natural drop off.
OMx is grades of *multimode* fibre used within building backbones and short distances i.e within racks at data centres typically < 500m. Multimode fibre is not used in external telecoms and especially not in any sort of PON or point-2-point topology used in FTTP.

Singlemode fibre is exclusively in terrestrial telecom networks, subsea links, etc. Since the early 2000’s singlemode fibre has been optimised to have zero water-peaks and dispersion shifted. It can sustain terrabit capacity up to hundreds of kilometres with the right optics. It’s a completely different animal.

When a fiber cable is bent excessively, the optical signal within the cable may refract and escape through the fiber cladding. Bending can also permanently damage the fiber by causing micro-cracks
The key is excessive - that is effectively broken. You can of course over bend fibre, beyond its limits during install or later. In the main though, spine cabling once installed it’s not really moved about. Drop fibres serving the premises from CBT and inside/out fibre from CSP etc. are typically G.657.x rated, so called bend insensitive fibre. In any event if the light levels are within the specified limits the fibre is good. It matters not if the subscriber is 20m from the node or 2km.

Openreach don’t OTDR every single customer connection, but they do test up to the splitter and often a port on the CBT, so if the cable from the splitter was going to be damaged it’s likely to be picked up at this point.

do wonder what these small tollerances will look like in 10,20,30 (or longer) years when even faster speeds are offered as they will not be an issue now but may be then which is why the closer the better imho.
There’s singlemode fibre which has been laid and in use for decades and is perfectly serviceable and useable. An enormous amount of fibre was deployed before and around the millennium by eager and enthusiastic global telecoms companies. In fact it was over-provisioned, however the happy legacy is that today much of that fibre continues to be used for cross country connectivity by the companies which succeeded those that went bust in the dot.com and telecoms bust of the noughties.
 
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