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Property address problems

I am posting here for the first time in case anyone else has my problem.

I live in the middle of the countryside with a poor ADSL broadband connection based on C20N network. A year ago, Openreach started installing overhead fibre cabling. It was brought all the way down our lane to the pole that serves us, the only house in the lane. An online check suggests that superfast broadband is now available but I have had difficulty finding an ISP able to connect me (including BT themselves).

The problem is at least in part due to my address. BT and Openreach use a database that has my postcode wrong. I have reported that to them more than once in the past, been told it would be updated, but it never has been. This means that the system does not recognize my house in the right location to be able to have an FTTP connection, even though it is patently obvious on site that it can.

My own ISP is unable to provide an FTTP service at present so I have tried looking elsewhere. AAISP were extremely helpful and identified the problem of the address. They told me that my ISP would have to make an ORDI request to BT Wholesale. They are doing that at present and we shall see what happens.

Looking on forums, I find the problem BT/Openreach has in recognizing some addresses and phone numbers is common. There is no "fuzzy logic" built into the system, so if some small thing is wrong, the whole system fails. When you combine this with the sheer weight of bureaucracy in trying to reach the right person or getting an error corrected, the level of frustration is enormous.

Hopefully, this will all now get resolved. The irony is that Openreach must have spent an enormous amount of money getting fibre to a pole that I can see from my window, but they currently have no means of getting any revenue to help pay for it!

Has anyone else been banging their head against this brick wall?
 

drsox

ULTIMATE Member
Given that A&A are clued up on it and know the procedure to correct the address.. migrate your plain 20CN to them, get them to do the address fix and then provide you with Fibre? (or allow you to migrate back to your old ISP to then get Fibre)?
 
Given that A&A are clued up on it and know the procedure to correct the address.. migrate your plain 20CN to them, get them to do the address fix and then provide you with Fibre? (or allow you to migrate back to your old ISP to then get Fibre)?
The problem is that I would lose my landline if I did that. AAISP offer a VOIP solution but because of the address issue, I would lose my landline as soon as they started the process and they warned me it could take a while.

I am currently with Aquiss, who are also very helpful, but do not currently offer a FTTP solution as it is not commercially viable for them. Because Aquiss have been so helpful over the past year (I joined after the collapse of Fast Internet), I would much rather remain loyal but I cannot pass up the chance of having proper grown-up broadband.

As usual with anything that has BT's moribund hand on it, it is all much more difficult than it should be!
 

drsox

ULTIMATE Member
How about get a new line installed? I know that would mean £'s but could be the less complicated solution here?
Providers usually have to match the address against the existing BT database before they can submit a line install request.
What is more complicated - I believe that BT Wholesale and BT Openreach don't even have the same database, so gets even more complicated trying to get addresses added or fixed.
 

Glovepup

ULTIMATE Member
Providers usually have to match the address against the existing BT database before they can submit a line install request.
What is more complicated - I believe that BT Wholesale and BT Openreach don't even have the same database, so gets even more complicated trying to get addresses added or fixed.
Yes it does help if the address is a GOLD address, but not impossible. At least it would mean not messing with the existing service.
 

aquiss

ISP Rep
We really do have this is situation in hand and already an address adjustment has been requested.

PS: Freeola, with GDPR around the corner, maybe it's not wise for you to be requesting customer personal details. What exactly would your policy be with this data?
 

Freeola

ISP Rep
We really do have this is situation in hand and already an address adjustment has been requested.

PS: Freeola, with GDPR around the corner, maybe it's not wise for you to be requesting customer personal details. What exactly would your policy be with this data?
Sorry Martin, didn't mean to step on your toes, was just trying to offer some assistance. As for GDPR, well we're not there yet and our policy is on our website.
 

Mark.J

Administrator
Staff member
ISPreview Team
Ah the wonders of GDPR.. ugggh it makes everything so tedious now.
 

drsox

ULTIMATE Member
going off topic now but I came across something yesterday that I can't see being legal now.. let alone after GDPR date.

An advert on a random site on the internet new the mobile phone number of my Three mobile dongle SIM!
I didn't type it, I don't even know what the number is until I checked, and it isn't associated with any of my accounts (Google, Microsoft etc.).

1) How did it link the browser on my computer with the SIM & number.
2) Surely doing that is abusing whatever partnership or access to databases the ad network has!
 

Mark.J

Administrator
Staff member
ISPreview Team
Hmm there are only two ways I can think of. Either the advert is simply 'reading' and 'republishing' open data from your PC/Smartphone and thus simply displaying it back to you (i.e. it never touches a remote server - it's called and displayed locally) or they've literally got your number, processed it and identified your IP as the owner.

I can't actually see how doing the latter would even be legal under the current DPA rules, let alone GDPR. I'm also not certain how they'd make it work accurately in the first place. The responsible advertiser would have a few questions to answer on that point. If you see it again then I'd try to inspect the adcode and see what URL the banner has pulled in as those can be tracked down.
 

Jehu

Member
This might be the sort of story your local TV station might like to publicise. Just a thought.
 
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