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The future of Micronet?

SusiBiker

Casual Member
Hi,

Don't post here much, but I wanted to pose a question to (mainly) those folks who have been using satellite for the past x years.
Why?

OK. In the past four years, I have subscribed to Europe-Online, Netsystem, Silvermead, and SatDrive. In all cases there was a "European Element" to the bandwidth allocation. By that I mean that the other European countries took a share in the BW.
In my last (EVER!!) subscription to a satellite service, SatDrive, the biggest problem this company had was that there was no ring-fenced BW available for them, and in turn, us, their customers. As a result, speeds dropped and tempers flared. A lot!
SatDrive themselves were a blazing star in the night, but the leeching of BW away by sales by other resellers abroad basically wrecked SatDrive's chances of long-term viability.

Now, this is in no way an attack on Micronet, Heaven knows there has been enough of that already, but I do wonder just how much BT's Long Reach ADSL service has affected Micronet's financial model. I have wondered if this move into the continental market is a direct result of this and if it will present declining BW for the home market?
I applaud Micronet for searching for markets on the continent, but every SatADSL supplier my partner and I have subscribed to in the last four years has seen its BW squeezed from abroad where terrestrial ADSL is not as prevalent as here.
In this case though, instead of Micronet getting squeezed by continental resellers, it's having a go at the continent itself. ;)

Will BW generally suffer? It's my opinion that it will. IMHO satellite for the UK is now dead in the water - there are only going to be a few poor souls who cannot get any form of terrestrial ADSL (including WiFi) who will remain with UK sat companies. God bless 'em. :eek:
 

Kommando

Top Member
I get ADSL next week after years of waiting and filling in with Sat with very mixed results so I will not be around to see the performance drop I now expect. Its not just long reach, it is the rural rollout in parallel that will be hurting too.
 

nathans

Top Member
That also mixed with the fact that the e-bird satellite is no longer an internet dedicated satellite, last week the bbc started to used a transponder on it to test its HDTV transmission studios
 

micronet

ISP Rep
Well firstly, we are in no way in any shape or form abandoning the home UK market[/

The UK market has become a very difficult one for us to predict or make a reliable financial model on simply because no hard or factual figures exist for the numbers of people who are unable to get broadband (which is very frustrating for us). for example, alot of our customers who are too far from the exchange for ADSL, still are unable to get the service despite the extended reach. Why can't they still get it? because the phone line that they use is still too poor despite some modifications from a BT engineer, which raises serious doubts about BT's figure of 99.8% - you have to remember, they are running ADSL on an age old copper infastructure that was never designed for such communication. You also have thousands of places just too remote or thousands of housing estates across the UK kitted out with optical fibre cabling.

So we really don't think the sat market is 'dead;' (or dying for that matter) in the UK, but it certainally does not have potential as it does overseas, which is why we expanded coverage of our service.

In terms of UK customers suffering Bandwidth 'hogging' from our overseas customers, rest assured we have plans to expand the bandwidth (even open new transponders on e-bird) if the service becomes too congested. E-bird will only be offered for European customers, all other areas such as South Africa and the middile east are covered by alternative Eutelsat satellites and have no affect on our UK customers.

Satellite operators realise that if providers are to be successful, the service needs to be good, otherwise they will all end up following satdrive into the ISP mass grave. We realise that this can easily be our fate unless we make our offering diverse and available to a mass population of people.

Our exclusive PAYG service is also soon arriving in the UK (the dish size for UK customers is too great at the moment, we have a capacity on a differant satellite srriving soon)

a bit like Satdrive gear system (minus the best efforts, or monthly payments) PAYG offers speeds of up to 4mbit, with no upfront costs or contract, in fact we offer it FREE! of charge. Customers can just credit the account and turn it on and off when they choose :cool:

We really appreciate opinions and comments about our service, and will take everybody's opinions and views aboard for both customer and company.
 

micronet

ISP Rep
We are also in process of being able to offer unlimited (both in download and bandwidth) 512k ADSL for just £18.99 a month.

Looking at the market at the moment, this seems to be a competetive price (cheaper than BT!) what do you lot think??

This will make us highly competitive in yet another market.
 

nathans

Top Member
This an ipstream service or datastream? If its datastream then its the same that centralpoint charge for theirs, with all the usuall pitfalls of a datastream service.
If its ipstream now thats a different story.
 

micronet

ISP Rep
What is the problem and differance with datastream? I think that is what it must be (im not personally dealing with it) as we are not putting up too much capital investment.

Are the speeds slower or is there a quality differance?

it still seems competitive with alot of suppliers out there, and does the end-user know the differance between IP stream & Data stream??
 

nathans

Top Member
I would guess if your not putting up much capital then it will be a datastream service, where the connection is taken out of the bt network earlier than usual using in span handover and handled by a eg telefonica, tiscali, this allows then to handle contention as they like, and they can reduce costs by loading bandwidths to the actual stated contentions of like 50:1 while bt state these they are hardly ever reached.

Ipstream is delivered directly to the provider over bt based lines. the upshots of this service is that users can migrate to this service easily, without having any downtime, while datastream they have to cease and provide which usually is at least 7-10 days and upto 3 weeks in telefonicas case.
 
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