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SSE Enterprise Win Contract to Support 1Gbps Fibre for 3,000 Scottish Homes

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 (10:52 am) - Score 952
countesswells development

SSE Enterprise Telecoms has scooped the 1Gbps fibre optic broadband network delivery contract for the £800m Countesswells Development in Scotland, which will create a new town with 3,000 homes and various spaces for business / schools near to Aberdeen.

One of the development’s aims is to be the “first community in Scotland” to provide residents with access to a “hyperfast” 1Gbps broadband (FTTP/H) service, which will be supplied by local ISP Grain. Prices are expected to range from £24.95 per month for an unlimited 100Mbps (symmetric) package, with free UK evening + weekend calls, and rise to £59.95 for the top 1000Mbps tier (setup is free on all packages).

The plan was announced earlier this year and since then Grain has been running a competitive tender to find a network partner that had a strong enough national fibre backbone, which is needed to help support the network’s high broadband speeds.

Rich Robinson, Managing Director of Grain, said:

SSE Enterprise Telecoms’ reputation for reliability and service delivery were important factors in our decision, but equally important was its expansive network reach. We are thrilled to be able to offer Countesswells residents access to the country’s latest and most advanced communications technology.

Together with SSE Enterprise Telecoms we are establishing a true fibre community network to Countesswells, delivering direct connections from the internet to the router in each property, ensuring absolutely no congestion is experienced at peak times.”

Mike Magee, Director of Service Solutions at SSE, said:

“As the development progresses over the next 15 years, the fibre network will be available for all new residents as they move into their homes, ensuring they benefit from hyperfast broadband and a crystal-clear fibre connection from day one. We’re glad to be able to use our expertise and growing network to work with Grain to offer cutting-edge connectivity.”

One disadvantage of such networks is that customers will only be able to take their service from a single ISP, which will leave them with nowhere else to turn if something goes wrong. However it’s always possible that rivals may deploy into the same area with time and meanwhile the price looks like very good value for money, so long as the service quality is maintained.

Meanwhile the Countesswells community is already starting to take shape; with the major new infrastructure well underway, extensive tree planting and landscaping undertaken and 100 of the new homes already built and new residents moving in.

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Mark Jackson

By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he is also the founder of ISPreview since 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.

Leave a Comment
5 Responses
  1. Ferrocene Cloud

    These nonsensical terms like “hyperfast” should be banned. What’s next after 1Gbps? Super-deluxe-awesome-megafast broadband?

  2. Salek

    I am already confused – which is faster Ultrafast or Hyperfast, what is the definition of Ultra and Hyper

    • Officially there is some recognition for “ultrafast”, which normally gets defined as 100Mbps+ unless you’re Ofcom where they’ve picked the figure of 300Mbps+; seemingly in order to align with the top consumer products of BT / Openreach and Virgin Media.

      Hyperfast has no official recognition, it’s all marketing spiel.

  3. Graham Turnbull

    I thought this was reasonable: “Hyperfast broadband might be used to describe speeds of 500Mb or higher, while gigabit broadband refers to services capable of achieving connections of 1Gb (1000Mb or 1 gigabit) or higher. While no national providers currently offer services of these speeds, some smaller local providers are already offering extremely fast full fibre optic broadband with the capacity to reach speeds of up to 1Gb.” from https://www.broadband.co.uk/guides/ultrafast-and-hyperfast-broadband/

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