The Definition of UK Superfast Next Generation Broadband - Introduction Page 1 - ISPreview
The Definition of UK Superfast Next Generation Broadband
By: Mark Jackson - October 25th, 2010 : Page 1 -of- 8
"the term "broadband" can, it appears, have different meanings depending on the context"

what is uk superfast next generation access nga broadbandUPDATE *4th July 2011*: On 13th May 2011 the UK government finally set upon a definition that agrees with our own conclusions. BDUK said that 90% of "people in each local authority area" should have access to superfast (25Mbps+) broadband ISP services by 2015. Thank god for that.

Here is an incredibly simple question, what is a bicycle? At this point your mind has probably conjured up something resembling a two wheeled vehicle that is powered by foot pedals and you'd be correct. Now try this one, what is broadband? Are we having fun yet, what did your mind come up with this time?

Some of you probably came close but we can almost guarantee that nobody got it perfectly correct because the term "broadband" can, it appears, have different meanings depending on the context. There was a time when broadband came synonymous with "fast internet access", albeit spoken in comparison to 56Kbps dialup connections, yet crucially what was fast then is slow today.

A small selection of broadband definitions from around the internet (global):

* Broadband Internet access, often shortened to just broadband, is a high data rate Internet access—typically contrasted with dial-up access using a 56k modem.

* A communications network in which the bandwidth can be divided and shared by multiple simultaneous signals (as for voice or data or video).

* An internet access service that responds to or operates at a wide band of frequencies.

* Any internet connection offering download speeds of 2Megabits per second (Mbps) or more.

* A network with high bandwidth (greater than 256 bps).

* A service or connection allowing large amounts of data to be carried very quickly, and which can split the available bandwidth into multiple channels.

* Broadband is a generic term for fast Internet access

The use of ambiguous wording like "fast", "high data rate" and "high bandwidth" receive a great deal of use in most attempts to define the term and yet they remain highly subjective to the time period in which they were first penned, not to mention the impact of individual perspectives; each giving rise to a new context.

Back in 2003 the UK telecommunications regulator, Oftel (now known as Ofcom), ran a review (consultation) on the 'Wholesale Unmetered Narrowband Internet Termination Market' in which it defined broadband as "higher bandwidth always-on services, offering data rates of 128kbps [0.12Mbps] and above".

Flash forward to March 2010, and Ofcom's review of the wholesale broadband market, that defines the service as merely a "connection which is capable of supporting always-on services which provide the end user with high data transfer speeds". Ah, "high data transfer speeds" again, now what does that mean, exactly? We asked but Ofcom couldn't tell us.

Bookmark and Share
Article Index:
Comments page 1 of 1
Click here to add a comment
Trevon
Posted 525 days ago
Heck yeah bay-bee keep them ciomng!
Longbeo
Posted 824 days ago
it was the same in poland but after many cmiplaons to the Commissioner for Civil Rights Protection form customers our government decided that it's against the law and now you could have broadband without land line. of course you have land line but you pay only for broadband. just few minutes ago i was ordering bt broadband here in uk and i was shocked that they forced me to order land line so i'll have to pay 10.99 for something that i'm not going to use. it's 18.99 for option 3 broadband and land line for broadband should be included in this price. i think the problem here is that bt is a one big monopolist in uk so every single company is forced to use their existing cable network. what is heppening now they have money for your land line rental and i'm 100% sure other companys are paing them for using bt land line to provide you with broadband so bt is paid well, twice from you directly and from your broadband company (aol, tiscali, virgin etc). bt is afraid that they'll loose lots of money if you go for skype calls or other internet communication software that alowes you to call any number directly from the internet. i'm really surprised that there is no any big customers complain on bt to government or something sorry it's my egnlish, but you know what i mean. someone should say stop because it's like a stealing in a day light and everyone around looks happy with that.
Ahmed
Posted 826 days ago
HI NICE... JUST WONDERING IF THIS POST IS UPDATED. I MEAN IF YOU ARE STILL SELLING THIS PREPAID BROADBAND KIT AND IF EVER YOU ARE, IS THERE ANYWAY I CAN BUY IT ONLINE? COZ I AM HERE IN CALIFORNIA AND I WANT TO GET IT FOR SOMEONE AND WHERE ARE YOU LOCATED AT EXACTLY COZ I DON'T WANT THEM TO TRAVEL FAR FOR IT AS THE PERSON I AM GIVING IT TO HAS AN ILL AND LEGALLY BLIND MOM TO TAKE CARE OF. LET ME KNOW PLS. I WOULD REALLY APPRECIATE IT IF YOU COULD EMAIL ME AT dmstuckey98@yahoo.com THANKS FOR THE TIME NICE, HAVE A GOOD DAY!
cyberdoyle
Posted 1458 days ago
by definition internet access should mean just that. A pipe to the internet. Down or up it your data will flow. Just like any other utility. You can have a swimming pool or a cup full. Depends what you want or need or are prepared to pay for. The only thing that can deliver it to everyone is fibre. For too long we have been held to ransom by a copper cabal flogging an obsolete solution to protect their old business model. Time to move on before it is too late. Light the fibre to every home. RIP copper.
Legolash2o
Posted 1459 days ago
MichGreg, i agree. We need 100Mbps fibre nationally.
MichGreg
Posted 1459 days ago
I think we really need 100mb - 100% nationally but everybody knows that won't happen in the next 10 years. But I don't want them to use existing ADSL, satellite or mobile tech and call it NGA either, that's just mad. Nice insight into all the different explanations.
 

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved (Terms, Privacy and Cookie Policy, Links (.), Website Rules)