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UPDATE Aylesbury Vale Council to Fix Rural Superfast Broadband Notspot

Thursday, March 12th, 2015 (1:40 pm) - Score 1,023

The Aylesbury Vale District Council in Buckinghamshire (England) has started a new pilot project, which is being funded with £1.5m from the local New Homes Bonus pot and aims to roll-out a superfast broadband (30Mbps) network across the rural villages of North Marston, Granborough and Hogshaw (more could follow).

The company that has been setup to manage all this – Aylesbury Vale Broadband – have already begun their initial site surveys and the first village hall meeting (North Marston) was held at the end of last week to discuss the plan, which was attended by somewhere between 130-150 people. Local MP, John Bercow (a familiar face as the House of Commons Speaker), was also present to lend his support.

Cllr Neil Blake, Leader of AVDC, said:

It was very encouraging to see so many local people attending the meeting and reinforces the importance of getting everyone connected. We are very keen to support this and believe it’s a great use of our New Homes Bonus. We are optimistic that if this pilot project proves successful then we will be able to roll this out to other locations in the Vale.”

At present there’s not a lot of detail about precisely what sort of solution AVB will be using to fix the village slowspots, although a new website is expected to be launched within the next couple of weeks and that will include more information.

Otherwise the current plan is for the new network to be completed by the end of this summer, although their website suggests that the first services might also start to go live as early as June. Meanwhile an earlier press release from 2014 indicates that the funding from AVDC could be used to unlock match funding of £2.56m from the government, although interestingly the latest update makes no mention of this and merely touts the £1.5m figure.

The areas identified by AVB as in need of help are those locations that appear set to miss out on coverage through the local Connected Counties project, which is otherwise aiming to expand the reach of BT’s “fibre broadband” (FTTC/P) network to 90% of local premises by the end of March 2016; this may soon be expanded.

It’s perhaps worth pointing out that North Marston is home to around 800 people, while Granborough’s population sits at about 600 and Hogshaw is tiny with around 80 locals to its name. Locals who want to support the scheme can register their interest on the website.

Hopefully their forthcoming website refresh also changes the mentions of MB/s to Mb/s, so as to avoid confusion between MegaBytes and Megabits per second.

UPDATE 16th March 2015

Roger Carey of Village Networks has informed us via email that they’re also present in some of the same area, which may create an overbuilding situation. Apparently the new AVDC project is also a line-of-sight wireless technology, although Carey isn’t sure where the backhaul will come from.

Naturally Village Networks isn’t too pleased with this, not least because AVDC appear to be using the same technology as their own setup and in the same areas. According to Carey, the Parish Council of one of the three communities’ identified for the pilot has already formally determined not to participate because they have the service already.

On the other hand the website for Village Network’s tends to promote speeds of up to 6Mbps (2Mbps upload) from £30 per month (plus a £222 setup fee), which isn’t particularly fast.

UPDATE:

Looking deeper into the VN website and a 24Mbps (1Mbps upload) option is available, but it will set you back £50 per month.

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By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
Leave a Comment
12 Responses
  1. DTMark says:

    That money might well be enough for a FTTP solution.

    So is what this is saying, is that despite BT having certain infrastructure in place, it is cheaper to ignore that and instead build a brand new network? 😉

    Will be interesting to see the nature of the proposed solution.

    1. Astroturfer says:

      £1.5 million won’t cut it for that for sure.

      It doesn’t look like a fixed line solution if they’re building from scratch. No way they’d get FTTP completed by the end of summer if they’re just surveying now. Not without a herculean build effort. Screams wireless to me.

  2. Steve Jones says:

    North Marston is shown blue (under evaluation) on the Connected Counties map, although it hasn’t been updated since Jun 2014.

    It will be interesting to know what technology this will be. If service is to be provide by June, that implies it’s probably wireless, as that’s a demanding timescale for any fixed infrastructure.

  3. fastman2 says:

    sam knows says there are aound 7 premises on that exchnage you would assume thatNorth Marston and Granborough would have their own PCPS so an enabling onf FTTC wouldly likely mean that those villages would be inexcess of 35/40 if they were enabled – besg the question around why the LA chose not incldue them or just look at putting the new homes money into the BDUK contrsact and including them

    seems very odd — FTTP is ensive prob far in excess of FTTC so not sure what the communtuy think they are going to get and when

    1. fastman2 says:

      sorry 700

    2. fastman2 says:

      also makes you wonder what how you are going to sort villages with circa 200 premises in each of the main 2 areas seems very odd

    3. DTMark says:

      The most obvious answers to that might be:

      1. The topography of the area isn’t suited to VDSL
      2. BT was too expensive

      Perhaps they can pop along and tell us..

  4. fastman2 says:

    or thirdly the La decided not to include in their deployment area for other reasons — suggest you ask the LA why it was not included as the LA detemine the intervention are and any prioroties — — both the main villages have cabs and close premuses so bith villages would have been superfast – so very strange !!!!

    1. DTMark says:

      Where did you get the line length and quality data (1,480 lines) to perform that analysis?

    2. fastman2 says:

      if there are pcps in the main centres and you buil a new cab to cover the EO in North Marston and those cabs are in the centres of those villages then if you are withing 500 -600 metres of those cabs then you would get circa 40 Mbps at an openreach network level — as there are only around 700 premuses in the excnage that would cover circa 70 – 80% of the exchnage

    3. DTMark says:

      If.. and .. and.. and.. then, maybe 70 to 80%

      Maybe that explains why they haven’t gone for VDSL?

      After all we’re within 600m of our cab, and for instance the Think Broadband map helpfully highlights where we are in green for potential super fast speeds.

      What it doesn’t take into account is that the ancient old wire is twice the length of the physical distance at 1.3km.

      But it makes the map look nice.

  5. fastman2 says:

    something odd aobut this exchange – looks like deliberately excluded

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