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1Gbps FTTH ISP Community Fibre to Cover 2800 City of London Homes

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018 (11:27 am) - Score 1,763

Full fibre broadband ISP Community Fibre has today followed yesterday’s announcement (here) by signing a new agreement with the City of London Corporation, which will see their 1Gbps UK FTTH broadband network being extended to cover 2,800 residential properties in the area.

The company states that it now has access to 150,000 homes throughout London, with the aim of having 500,000 properties covered via affordable ultra-fast Fibre-to-the-Home (FTTH) broadband connections by the end of 2022. More and more London boroughs are expected to sign-up over the coming months and years.

The ISP’s existing agreements in the city already include Southwark (54,000), Wandsworth (35,000), Hammersmith and Fulham (17,000), Westminster (9,000), Genesis Housing (33,000), Richmond (9,000) and now the City of London (2,800).

Jeremy Chelot, CEO of Community Fibre, said:

“We are delighted to be working with the City of London Corporation to bring Gigabit services to properties in London. It shows the commitment and push for innovation by the Corporation to help us provide the best connectivity to meet residents’ needs. By 2022, Community Fibre will bring full-fibre connections to more than 500,000 properties across London, providing more Londoners with the Internet they deserve at affordable prices.”

Sadly no details about the exact coverage, costs or deployment time-scale have been revealed. Technically today’s news was unofficially revealed as a footnote to yesterday’s announcement but this marks the official confirmation.

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By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
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16 Responses
  1. virgin says:

    Too many FTTP/FTTH is planning for Tory London!

    1. Mark Jackson says:

      You mean aside from the fact that more London boroughs voted Labour in the last General Election and the Mayor is Labour?

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election/2017/results/england

      Pretty sure these urban FTTH/P providers are just focused on finding a deployment model that works for them and not trolling politics.

    2. CarlT says:

      Translation: Why are Central London and the Greater London sprawl getting FTTP when I’m not?

      Answer: London is the largest city in Europe. The outskirts of Telford aren’t.

    3. Joe says:

      The bigger question is why (even allowing for significantly higher costs of works etc) its taken this long to happen.

    4. Rahul says:

      I think this is purely psychological.

      For example I live near the City of London E1 area. We don’t have Fibre Optic yet, not even FTTC like I said before.

      But when I read articles or news of Fibre Optic deployments in rural areas I ask myself “why only rural areas?” And then again I think it’s because in rural areas it is easier to dig the soil as there’s less pavements and asphalts compared to the City of London.

      But people in rural areas think the fibre focus is only in the big cities like London. Ask the Londoners and they think the opposite it’s the rural areas that have greater privilege. Something like the B4RN project. Believe me, I would take the initiative right now to dig my streets and drill in a hole in my building and work as part of a team to install the fibre optic cables for free in the best interest of all of us!

      But I or my neighbours can’t do that because we require permission for the digging of street pavements and even building permission from authorities. We will be fined if we try to do that. But in rural areas like Lancashire’s B4RN project, no problem they have nothing to destroy other than grass from the soil which will obviously regrow back again! And they also live in individual houses where you don’t need authority, in this case you are the authority and can make decisions. If you destroy your property in a rural area you take personal responsibility and there are no legal implications. Nobody will fine you for destroying your own house! But if you destroy a building property you will get fined even if you are the leaseholder of that property.

      This is why the fibre optic deployment will take years to complete in the big cities compared to towns and villages due to permission and that discouragement of having to dig asphalt, pavements and requesting building ownership permission will mean it will naturally delay the installation. This is going to be a very tedious process!

    5. Joe says:

      They may well think that but of course thinking it doesn’t make it true. Rural FTTP is low. The idea that the rural community is getting a better deal is comical.

  2. James Blessing says:

    You can see their pricing plans in the really nice google form they ask you to fill in to order the service – https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc7gL8ngauKlkqaewz_mzgSyfng2Ku85BQld7PFpNZKXkWWVg/viewform?c=0&w=1

    1. Mark Jackson says:

      The prices are on their front page too James, you just have to scroll down quite a lot to see them. We also list them on this website 🙂 .

    2. Sam says:

      Hi James,

      Our new website will be live in the coming weeks and will make the user experience much nicer and easier. If you want to know more about what we do, always welcome to contact our customer service team 24/7 🙂

      Thank you

  3. Matthew Olaleye says:

    In this day and age, no fibre broadband in Thamesmead, London. I wonder why virgin media is not allowed to lay fibre all over the UK. I barely get 10Mb/s in Thamesmead and my office in Erith and virgin media fibre isn’t far away. This government has to do something drastically about it. Fixed wireless broadband can be deployed easily to make up for lack of fibre cabling. My friend in Cork, IRELAND has 350Mb/s virgin media broadband, I wonder why I can’t in London.

    1. CarlT says:

      They are permitted to lay cable anywhere, with local authority permission, they choose not to.

    2. Joe says:

      “My friend in Cork, IRELAND has 350Mb/s virgin media broadband, I wonder why I can’t in London.”

      You could buy the whole of Cork for the cost of parts of London. land values and dense urbanisation = high cost of deployment!

    3. h42422 says:

      Joe: From where do the high deployment costs arise?

      We had Hyperoptic installed a couple of months ago. They had their fibre about 300m away. They did the complete installation of the fibre in a day without digging up any streets. They just lifted manhole covers on walkways and used existing conduits.

      In rural areas digging may be cheap and easy, but do we really need to dig that much in urban areas? At least in our case no digging was involved. One day of work (three people) should not be that expensive compared to rural deployments, where it may be necessary to dig miles.

    4. Joe says:

      @h42422

      As always these things are variable. If you happen to live near to existing F and the route to your house is covered by ducting (not blocked and capable of fitting new conduit etc) then it can be relatively cheap (high density urban areas are cheap). But often the ducts are blocked or full; or non existent requiring the road to be dug up and potentially many other roads. In places like London the complexity in time/paperwork to get the permissions (you can keep changing owner of the road/pavement/park etc in tiny distances) let alone the cost of permissions and (potential) road closure charges and reinstatement costs can get prohibitive very quickly. Often council and local residents objections force deployments to be conducted in a completely suboptimal way.

    5. Joe says:

      I should probably have mentioned Section 58 notices as one of Dante’s circles of hell for deployments

  4. Joe says:

    http://www.broadbanduk.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Lowering-barriers-to-telecoms-infrastructure-deployment-Final-report.pdf

    This is not specifically urban but part 4 gives some hints of the mess from a paperwork/permit level.

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