Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

CityFibre and Fujitsu Join Forces to Deploy Fibre Optic Broadband in UK Cities

Tuesday, May 1st, 2012 (7:46 am) - Score 1,076

CityFibre Holdings, which builds Fibre-to-the-Home (FTTH) style fibre optic infrastructure, has announced a new engineering agreement with Fujitsu that will progress their plans for deploying ultrafast broadband (100Mbps+) services “throughout the UK’s second tier cities” to reach 1 million homes and 50,000 businesses.

The contract, which is estimated to be worth an initial £50 million, will give Japan-based Fujitsu responsibility for “key elements of planning, building and operating CityFibre’s carrier-grade” fibre infrastructure. It’s believed that the firms involvement will also help to “accelerate” CityFibre’s current plans.

Greg Mesch, CEO of CityFibre, said:

We are delighted to be working with Fujitsu. It is invaluable to have an outsourcing partner of such reputation working with us in our roll-out of transformational fibre infrastructure to over 1 million UK homes and over 50,000 businesses throughout the UK’s second tier cities.

Fujitsu’s credentials in network deployment could not be stronger and few companies have as much knowledge of UK telecoms infrastructure. They are uniquely positioned to assist CityFibre in meeting our ambitious objectives across the entire fibre infrastructure spectrum, from mobile backhaul to metro networks and Fibre-to-the Premises.”

Andy Stevenson, CEO of Fujitsu Telecommunications Europe, added:

We are very happy to embark on this agreement with CityFibre. This project takes advantage of all Fujitsu’s core competencies including planning, building and operating next generation access networks across the world. We are excited by the opportunity to work with such a forward thinking company and look forward to delivering world-class infrastructure across the UK.”

Few will be surprised by today’s news. Fujitsu is known to have built CityFibre’s 103km fibre optic / Fibre-to-the-Premises (FTTP) network around the City of York, which went extremely well for the developer and is now being expanded for use by local homes (here).

The operators next rollout, which is part of their longer-term £500 million plan (original news) and will be based around CityFibre’s “unique open access wholesale model“, is expected to commence during this Spring 2012. CityFibre has yet to confirm precisely which “second tier” cities it will focus upon, although this apparently includes areas that suffer from a “lack of critical fibre infrastructure“.

But CityFibre are likely to face increasingly aggressive competition from major rivals, such as BT, which are already threatening to gain an advantage by making use of the governments new and sometimes controversial £150 Million Urban Broadband Fund (details).

Leave a Comment
9 Responses
  1. me says:

    nice news indeed 🙂 I wonder what will happen with customers, will they be tied in to a 2yr contract at £40/month or something if they take out a fibre contract from cityfibre?

  2. Mark Jackson says:

    Customers, as in consumers, wouldn’t take out a contract with CityFibre because they just supply the network that Fujitsu now looks set to build. The actual service would come from a third party ISP, as per the reference to “open access wholesale model” above.

  3. DTMark says:

    Do we know how the ring was constructed e.g. how have this company achieved the hitherto complely impossible, of installing a wide-scale “superfast” infrastructure in a city which to my knowledge nobody has ever done successfully before (apart, as you indicate, from Bournemouth and that wasn’t a riotous success) because, among other things, as we all know from that telephone company – it’s not commercial and can’t possibly be done without oodles of taxpayer cash.

  4. Building a fibre ring linking council premises – I thought CityFibre had already completed that.

    Until such time as consumers are connected, and they see the network being installed I won’t be holding my breath.

    York already has FTTP or FTTC from Openreach and Virgin Media in some areas, some will soon have the choice of three networks.

  5. DTMark says:

    Streetmap, York, click on the map in three random fairly central places.

    10 meg ADSL, 4 meg ADSL and 2 meg ADSL. No fibre.

    I suppose it’s something that at least one out of the 3 locations in the middle of a big city can get a broadband service at the moment in the year 2012 albeit from a choice of only one infra provider. If I keep on trying postcodes I’m sure to hit one where Virgin Media bothered eventually.

    I’d have thought BT ought to have an advantage in terms of hooking up the “D-side” but deploying that [FTTP] in Milton Keynes seems to have been going on forever thanks to “blocked ducts”. What interests me especially, and, Andrew’s point – who is being hooked up to this, and when?

  6. Milverton says:

    And rural folk who struggle with 2Mbps to a max of 9Mbps if they are extremely fortunate? I don’t see much hope in having fibre out to rural areas. Despite the hyperbole from Fujitsu and the Government. Our national communications infrastructure, which is primarily BT controlled and maintained(?), is quite low down on the list of countries with 21st century communications for the people. Not usually a cynic but, I can’t see much change overall in the next ten years. The Government expects private industry to provide. Fine, although we all know that if it isn’t profitable it’s not going to happen. That’s not a slight against companies as they have to make a profit or go bust. It’s a comment about how we perceive communications and in particular IT. IT services are still not perceived as ‘utility’. Until that perception changes we will have to get by as best we can.

    1. DTMark says:

      I agree in part on your last point, however, the same issue impacts urban and rural = no competition. Unless you’re in a cabled area, and half the country is not.

      If the Government declared broadband to be a “utility” that might require the imposition of an actual USO – for instance, electricity is always within a certain voltage/current (I’m not an electrician) so you don’t move into your new house to find you can’t run heaters or a fridge because “your line is too long” or “it’s made of poor quality metal”, and if you dare ask the provider to repair the fault you then get a big bill for a no fault found scenario and told to stop being so silly because that’s all you may expect.

      A USO would require an infrastructure capable of delivering same and the Government has little or no real control over the private sector here. Which is normally a Very Good Thing. Except when it’s held back by an infrastructral monopoly. In which case the Government would need to:

      1. Identify the problem
      2. Identify possible solutions (based around ducting, access, and creating a market)
      3. Cost it then be honest about what’s achievable in given locations, and think about ways to incentivise providers rather than the rather dishonest position of telling the public they’ll get something while 1. Not really knowing how it’s going to be provided and 2. Not really doing anything positive to actually encourage investment from anyone other than the same major players who have held it back.

      In essence most of the BDUK money is likely to go to some satellite providers and a telephone company, thus entrenching the monopoly position and accepting satellite as “modern broadband”, in time killing all the small ISPs who only really exist because OFCOM and BT allow them to at the moment.

      While a monopoly remains in half the country, all talk of whether an area is commercially viable for upgrades is just silly nonsense. Technically, there is no telephone line in the country that is viable to upgrade to faster speeds when that telephone line is the only method of broadband delivery to a location. I cannot see how it could ever be commercially viable when the customer has no choice but to purchase poor quality services. Unless the begging bowl goes round, of course.

      Unless there is a threat of competition (LTE/4G, local projects, councils might just be silly and not give the money to BT) then taxpayers money pushes a section of the country forward but leaves all the same mechanics in place which will mean that the begging bowl will be back again in the future because the single biggest issue remains in perpetuity.

  7. Deduction says:

    quote”Building a fibre ring linking council premises – I thought CityFibre had already completed that.

    Until such time as consumers are connected, and they see the network being installed I won’t be holding my breath.”

    Homes in the Bournemouth area are already connected. The CFH service is available through a company/brand called fibreband in Bournemouth area postcodes they cover. I see no reason why it wont be available in other areas as the rollout happens.

  8. Daniel Davis says:

    People in cities can get between 8 and 24mbps on regular broadband – they have no particular need of fibre-optic. Meanwhile rural areas are often struggling to get 1.5 mbps which means that they cannot watch video or use any on-demand service, or do any regular business activity. The government gave £530 million to assist rural areas, but the delivery dates just keep getting pushed back with Openreach being the worst offenders. How about no cities get upgraded until the rest of us get a decent service?

Comments are closed.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £15.00 (*25.00)
    Speed 50Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £19.50 (*22.50)
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • NOW £20.00 (*32.00)
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Shell Energy £21.99 (*30.99)
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Plusnet £22.99 (*38.20)
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: £65 Reward Card
Large Availability | View All
New Forum Topics
»
EE 5g band n1 ?!?
Author: countrybumpkin
»
»
Cellmapper Update Frequency
Author: The Wee Bear
»
Outdoor CPEs
Author: TTJJ
»
Abandoned mast
Author: Zathan
Cheapest Ultrafast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £20.00 (*35.00)
    Speed: 150Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £24.00 (*27.00)
    Speed: 100Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Community Fibre £25.00 (*29.50)
    Speed: 300Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Gigaclear £26.00 (*54.00)
    Speed: 400Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Virgin Media £27.00 (*51.00)
    Speed: 108Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Large Availability | View All
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. FTTP (3494)
  2. BT (3007)
  3. Politics (1922)
  4. Building Digital UK (1915)
  5. FTTC (1882)
  6. Openreach (1819)
  7. Business (1673)
  8. Mobile Broadband (1468)
  9. Statistics (1404)
  10. FTTH (1364)
  11. 4G (1270)
  12. Fibre Optic (1164)
  13. Virgin Media (1158)
  14. Wireless Internet (1151)
  15. Ofcom Regulation (1139)
  16. Vodafone (836)
  17. EE (829)
  18. TalkTalk (760)
  19. 5G (759)
  20. Sky Broadband (744)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms , Privacy and Cookie Policy , Links , Website Rules , Contact