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Quickline Saves Lincolnshire Wireless ISP Linpop from Going Bust

Thursday, November 21st, 2013 (1:48 pm) - Score 1,867
linpop

Linpop (Linpop Broadband Now), a small fixed wireless broadband ISP that serves residents and businesses in the Trent Valley area of rural North Lincolnshire (England), has been rescued (merger) for an undisclosed sum by local provider Quickline after it fell into administration last month.

The surprise development followed Linpop’s decision in August 2013 to appointment Chris Lowe as its new Chief Executive. At the time Linpop claimed to be connecting 15 to 20 new customers a week and its Founder, Dr Vaughan Kitchin, said the service offered, “a unique and world-class technology that delivers reliable, high quality, secure broadband services even to rural locations.”

Unfortunately, at some point over the past couple of months, Linpop hit troubled times and became an insolvent company due to some unspecified cash-flow problems.

Steve Jagger, MD of Quickline, said (The Lincolnite):

It completely makes sense to join together rather than compete and takes Quickline one-step closer to becoming the largest footprint WiMAX provider in the UK. As an independent wireless internet service provider, we have invested in our own technology since 2007, which means that we can provide an excellent service and keep overheads and customer costs under control.

In my opinion, the planned provision from BDUK will seemingly widen the digital divide by speeding up urban areas and leaving rural areas with as little as 0.2Mg connection. To negate this, we are providing those who choose to live in the countryside an internet connection that is equal to urban areas. By working with wireless internet service providers around the UK, the Government’s 2015 broadband target can be achieved.”

We’re not entirely sure what the “0.2Mg” connection remark is all about because the Government’s Universal Service Commitment (USC) is for a minimum of at least 2Mbps (download speed) and we assume “Mg” also equates to Megabits. However Linpop’s founder does put some of the blame at the feet of local government for shunning their plan with Quickline to make faster broadband available to the entire county. “Together we aim to cover the whole of Lincolnshire, which seems to be omitted from realistic national broadband supply plans,” said Kitchin.

Quickline, much like other fixed wireless ISPs, are perhaps concerned for the future given that most of the state aid being pumped into the national Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) scheme is being funneled towards fixed line provision from BT. North and North East Lincolnshire’s related £5.7m project aims to make BT’s “fibre broadband” (FTTC/P) network available to 89% of local premises by the end of Spring 2015 (here).

It’s worth pointing out that Quickline’s AIRFibre Home product offers download speeds of between 8-25Mbps (10Mbps uploads) from £27.50 per month (£195 installation).

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1 Response
  1. Avatar Rog Burton says:

    “We’re not entirely sure what the “0.2Mg” connection remark is all about because the Government’s Universal Service Commitment (USC) is for a minimum of at least 2Mbps (download speed) and we assume “Mg” also equates to Megabits.”

    I’ll tell you what it means …. this.

    I live in one the villages in West Lindsey, and typically using BT broadband over copper telephone wires, would normally achieve roughly a 2mbit connection, but with some trickery, a different modem and line in good condition with no crackle or line-noise achieve 3-4 mbits throughput.
    But the problem here is the line, to achieve that the line has to be “perfect”.
    And when the line is perfect BT broadband will operate at 6db SNR, which is the line’s base setting for signal to noise ratio, run automatically by BT’s exchanges. Most people don’t have perfect lines, they are old copper lines, and some aluminium, that don’t offer a clean connection … and when this happens BT’s line algorithm which runs the broadband over the loop from the exchange automatically increases the line noise margin from 6db up to 15db and beyond. What happens then is for every increase increment in SNR level above 6db you end up with a proportionally lower linespeed, until you can actually end up with 100k throuphput or even less!
    Running ADSL through copper phone lines has to be algorithm controlled, and the lines themselves are dragging the potential performance down, so in effect most people never see the fully monty, (if you want to call it that!)
    And because BT will not pay for rural fibre connections, ADSL down wires is the only way it can go unless alternative technologies are available.

    Those technologies now exist in the form of Wimax wireless broadband from companies with foresight like Quickline. I know Quickline works because I subscribed to it 3 months ago, at first tentatively, but having it now for 3 months I find it excellent, reliable, fast and consistent.
    I can easily get speeds of 12mbits down and 4+mbits up … and when the network is at its most quiet period I can achieve 25mbits down and 10mbits up. So far as throughput, downloading and general internet browsing is concerned it all happens quickly and surely.
    I say well done Quickline, I hope you go from strength to strength, because you have given us rural folk an internet connection that is fast, trouble-free, runs no dodgy algorithms and just gets on with it … day after day. Nice one!!

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