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Northamptonshire UK Sign Second Superfast Broadband Contract with BT

Tue, Dec 16th, 2014 (2:11 pm) - Score 598
bt superfast fibre van

The Superfast Northamptonshire project in England, which is currently aiming to make BT’s superfast broadband (FTTC/P) services available to about 90% of premises by September 2015, has finally signed a new contract with BT under the Broadband Delivery UK based Superfast Extension Programme (SEP). An extra 20,465 premises will now benefit from the on-going roll-out.

At present the existing contract is expected benefit 56,000+ local homes and businesses, while the additional 20,465 (i.e. 6.4% of all premises in the county) will be added between 2016 and September 2018. The local authority, with support from BDUK, has contributed £7.6 million of extra public funding to the effort, while BT has invested another £3.3 million.

The contract itself was signed on 28th November last month and at that point the work with BT had already helped to upgrade around 34,280 additional premises with access to FTTC and some FTTP connectivity. The addition of a second contract means that “almost” 95% of all premises in the county should have access to superfast broadband speeds (24Mbps+), although the 2018 completion date suggests that it will finish later than the “by 2017” goal of BDUK.

Parts of rural villages including Dingley, Loddington, Welford and Rockingham will be among those to benefit from the forthcoming deployments. Now all they have to do is figure out how to fill the final 5% by 2020.

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Mark Jackson
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he is also the founder of ISPreview since 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
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11 Responses
  1. GNewton

    Again, what a collosal waste of money here!

    Assuming the total figures of £10,900,000 and 20,465 premises are correct, and assuming a generous takeup of eventually 25% (not very likely, but there you are), this amounts to £2,130 (taxpayer’s part is £1,485) per VDSL line.

  2. Steve Jones

    I very much doubt your implicit assumption in the calculation that only VDSL will be used is true. As the project ventures further into rural areas FTTC becomes less and less appropriate is more cost effective (although some form of FTTrN can’t be completely ruled out of course). The lessons from other more rural projects is that FTTP is increasingly used in later parts of the project in order to reach less densely populated locations (for example, Cornwall and Cumbria).

    It would be interesting to know what the proportion of FTTP will be, but I don’t for one moment think it will the 0%.

    • No Clue

      Er that would make it more expensive then considering you have been telling us all here for years FTTP is more expensive than FTTC

    • Steve Jones

      @No Clue

      No, what I said is that for more densely populated areas FTTC is cheaper (and faster) to roll-out than FTTP. Clearly, if there’s a hamlet of a couple of dozen houses, a cabinet that costs perhaps £30k + installation and getting power doesn’t make sense. There is a cross-over point. Possibly FTTrN of come sort might be a bit cheaper if some sort of line power could be provided, but I think the economics are far from certain (hence anything of that sort is in trial).

      Also, for some locations no form of DSL makes sense. Those lone farmhouses and clusters of cottages.

      nb. I’ve made the same point previously as regards to cross-over points on costs.

    • DTMark

      The ‘digital agenda’ news article is salient here..

      > 2Mbps

      Netherlands
      100%

      UK
      98.4% 100Mbps

      Netherlands
      97.6%

      UK
      47.7% (cable coverage 47%)

      .. and we’re ‘in trials’.

    • @Steve the list price for a single fully equipped VDSL cab is approx £12k +-10%. If ordering 600 of these objects a counties then quotes range £7,500-£8,500. If your benefitting from a national deployment then invoicing should range – £4,500 – £5,500 per cab depending on supplier. I do not know if BDUK/LA are paying for the first card or two cards, this might reduce it further. But this would be a useful truth test of the reconciliation process moving from milestone payments to actual costs.

      BT reported to the BBC they costed BDUK on a county basis, so it is unknown if all the potential discount is being passed along or not.

      I am not sure it would breech NCC confidentiality agreements to know which range they are paying.

    • Steve Jones

      @NGA for all

      If you say so, but a link would be nice. I can find small scale DSLAMs for putting in data centre type environments, but not street cabinets equipped with DSLAMs/MSANs, UPS and the like.

      Anyway, it’s more the principle that as a certain point FTTP makes more financial sense (and that’s without taking into account operational costs, like maintenance, power and so on). It’s just where that breakpoint is.

      Of course, much of the cost is in getting fibre out to the locality and that’s going to be similar.

    • No Clue

      Why should he prove himself with links while you spout idle nonsense?

    • No Clue

      “No, what I said is that for more densely populated areas FTTC is cheaper (and faster) to roll-out than FTTP.”

      Best go tell this new insightful contradiction to BT and all the areas they have enabled with FTTC which have only around 1000 or less per exchange.

  3. nga for all

    @steve what is you cost for fibre and either pulling it through duct or attaching it to poles. The extras will be many but an underlying cost of £3 per metre is not overcooking it!

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