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ISP Full Fibre Aims to Expand UK Coverage of its Wholesale Network

Friday, March 15th, 2019 (1:09 pm) - Score 1,710
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The imaginatively named Exeter-based business ISP Full Fibre Limited, which currently claims to operate a core network between its two data-centres in London and fibre broadband access networks in Devon and Surrey, has revealed that they have tentative plans to expand their fibre network.

At present the details are quite limited, which isn’t too surprising since the ISP was only incorporated back in November 2017 and is thus still quite young. Interestingly the company’s CEO, Oliver Helm, is also the Director of another fairly young ISP called Surrey Hills Internet Ltd. and he helps to run a telecoms / network consultancy called Cunniffe & Helm.

Under the tentative plan Full Fibre Ltd. hopes to expand their network within their existing patches around Devon and Surrey, before growing into other areas starting with Somerset, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. Apparently their “primary focus” will be on catering for “rural and semi-urban areas” (i.e. usually those that are poorly served).

A related application for Code Powers from Ofcom (i.e. this speeds up deployment by reducing the number of licenses needed for street works) reveals that the “proposed fibre access networks would have the potential to deliver ultrafast and gigabit broadband services to residential and business users. Leased line services would also be available.”

The ISP also intends to offer broadband packages at “affordable wholesale prices” (at present this is their primary focus), which they say would help other ISP’s to maintain a competitive retail price to their customers. It also intends to offer reduced charges to community orientated organisations such as schools, nurseries, churches, community centres, non-profit organisations and social housing schemes.

One other reason for the pursuit of Code Powers is that it will enable the ISP to make use of existing infrastructure, including sewers and Openreach’s (BT) Physical Infrastructure Access (PIA) product “wherever possible” (PIA can be used to reduce their network deployment costs and the disruption associated with civil works).

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Mark Jackson
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
Leave a Comment
6 Responses
  1. Avatar A_Builder

    I dread to think how much they paid the branding agency.

    Usually the more obvious and banal the branding the more it costs……..emperors new clothes and all that.

  2. Avatar AnotherTim

    With the Fastershire and CDS BDUK schemes rolling out FTTP to the same “rural and semi-urban areas” as Full Fibre are planning to target, who will they be wholesaling to?
    Will the demand in rural areas really support two (or more) FTTP networks?
    Also I can’t see the point of mentioning sewers – we don’t have any here.

  3. Avatar Guy Cashmore

    Good luck to them. As a Devon resident and business owner, we live in hope that someone might come along and hang some fibre on the existing pole routes for less than the outrageous £10+ per meter that the BT monopoly demands..

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