Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

Openreach Trial FTTP Broadband Speed Test to Identify Faults

Wednesday, November 10th, 2021 (1:56 pm) - Score 10,008
nokia_ONT_fttp_openreach

Openreach (BT) has informed UK ISPs about the launch of a new speed test trial for their gigabit-capable Fibre-to-the-Premises (FTTP) broadband lines, which looks as if it will be used to help identify where on the network a speed fault actually exists (i.e. is it on Openreach’s side or not).

At present existing speed tests can be setup in a lot of different ways, including everything from unreliable web-based testing to tests that are conducted on third-party router hardware, or the provider’s own consumer router (CPE) via customised firmware. Some of these methods are better than others and all can make it hard to find the source of the issue.

The public briefing on this doesn’t tell us anything at all (here), but we understand that it will involve trials of a layer 3 (network layer) speed test that can be run between the operator’s Optical Network Terminal (ONT), which are those cream coloured boxes (modems) that they install on the inside of your home, and a speed test device in the exchange.

The test will reroute the circuit from the provider’s network to the Openreach tester, thus enabling them to effectively prove or disprove that a speed issue sits on Openreach’s side of the network or not. The approach should make it easier to rule out other sources of performance problems, such as the customer’s router, congestion on the GEA Cablelink connecting the provider’s switch to the Optical Line Terminal (OLT), the provider’s backhaul capacity, core network and transit / peering etc.

By the sounds of it, both Openreach and ISPs will be quite welcoming of such a feature, as it will reduce some of the work involved with investigating such difficulties for both sides. This is also a reminder, if it were needed, that speed issues do still occur on full fibre lines too, even if the physical line itself is no longer the main cause (like it often was with copper cables).

Leave a Comment
10 Responses
  1. Bob says:

    All steps in the right direction. Judt a shame I can’t get FTTP.

  2. Meadmodj says:

    I would have thought the network statistics provided sufficient information that would identify problems (synching, ONT timing etc). Any speed test presumably would prove that the correct product profile was being applied.

    Providers do not have a track record for being proactive so I assume the real world process will continue to include reported fault, help desk ping pong, it must be you, complaint and threat of leaving.

    1. A_Builder says:

      The stats would to you or I.

      What OR is, I think, doing is to produce an idiot proof diagnostic test that gives a specific fault diagnosis.

      It is a shame they shied away from doing this before with copper.

      Old management consulting dictum – measure it – it improves.

    2. Jonny says:

      I think that while they do monitor their own network, they don’t want to get into doing proactive monitoring of individual circuits as that should be something that ISPs do (as they’re the ones that actually have the L3 connection), integrating Openreach test tools where necessary to check the physical state of the link.

      Being able to kick the ONT into a test mode and report back light levels and confirm a connection to an Openreach test endpoint is valuable information, and ISPs should be picking up from that point. If you think of it as a way of ruling in/out an Openreach problem it should hopefully reduce the instances of engineers attending properties for issues that have nothing to do with them.

    3. anonymous says:

      Those stats will only show issues between the optics on the OLT and ONT.

      Without timing being correct the ONT is offline. Without light it’s offline. Marginal light causing performance issues shows as an error counter and light levels.

      No need for a test mode for those, the ONT reports telemetry to the OLT and may be polled, too.

      It is purely to prove the fault off the Openreach network.

    4. A_Builder says:

      “ It is purely to prove the fault off the Openreach network.”

      That is exactly my point.

      It is to make it transparent in sunny language that ONT -> OLT us fine.

  3. adslmax says:

    Thinking Openreach target me as a speed test to avoid them to come out lol

  4. plunet says:

    Ah, the 21st century equivalent of 17070 (formerly 174?) to help the infrastructure provider prove that it’s someone else’s problem…

  5. Wibster says:

    This would certainly be a help. I’ve recently had over 6 weeks of FTTP speed topping out at 94mbs, when I am paying TB for their 900mbs package. After several tests that I personally performed I contacted BT who had me run the same tests, swap cables and also request I replace my own cat8 cable between the ONT and router with their Cat6 cable (for Ethernet connected devices, I also use cat8 as it’s relatively inexpensive. Two Openreach engineer visits later and from the beginning Openreach saying their infrastructure was all ok, including swapping the ONT one, BT still wanted a further OR engineer visit, until I suggested a router replacement, after BT initially sending the wrong router and FTTC version and them then requiring about 2 days to update their systems to say I wasn’t on FTTC (the change initially being made when they ordered me the wrong router) I received the correct router and immediately speed returned to normal. Yes, I did get a credit in my account for the inconvenience, but I’d still have liked the issue sorted more efficiently and quicker if such test tools were available to diagnose at what point the problem existed and therefore resolved sooner

  6. Seb says:

    So I’ve had a new ONT device installed this morning with Talk Talk (replacing a virgin copper installation at 500mbs) to a supposedly gigabit 940mb installation, they even threw in a couple of eero pro 6 mesh WiFi routers all in, much better deal and cheaper than virgin I thought…

    Since then I’ve had my down speeds at 275mbs via WiFi and 400mbs via ethernet so I decided to call talk talk to sort it out and they told me on their end looking at the ONT they see a full 940mbs !!! They told me there’s nothing they can do if those are the speeds they can see from their end and I should swap cables and update softwares on devices I’ve already got…

    Now, I have a series x, a MacBook Pro 2021 and a S22 ultra and they all get the speeds I mentioned above, and before the install this morning I was getting both ethernet and WiFi 540mb (higher than what I was actually paying for!!) So why all of a sudden they would have dropped to a quarter of what I’m now contracted for ! I’ve also explained to them that even trying a different router (the one I was using in conjunction with my virgin hub) an Asus AC88U and I’m also getting those low speeds so nothing wrong with the eero pro 6 routers.

    So it leaves the cable (then again I’ve tried two different cat 6 and a cat6E cables and no difference whatsoever.

    They’re telling me it’s all fine which is frustrating because it is absolutely not ! And when I inquired about having someone to come back to have a look at it they’re now telling me I’ve got to pay £50 for an engineer to come out, even though it has nothing to do from my end… All in all very unhappy with my first day with Talk Talk is an understatement!!!

    Anyone else had something similar ?

Comments are closed.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Cheapest Ultrafast ISPs
  • Gigaclear £17.00 (*40.00)
    Speed: 200Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Community Fibre £20.00
    Speed: 150Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Virgin Media £25.00
    Speed: 108Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £25.00
    Speed: 100Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Hyperoptic £25.00
    Speed: 150Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Large Availability | View All
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £17.99
    Speed 30Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • NOW £21.00
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Shell Energy £21.99
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £22.00
    Speed 38Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Plusnet £22.99
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: £60 Reward Card
Large Availability | View All
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. FTTP (4004)
  2. BT (3128)
  3. Politics (2085)
  4. Building Digital UK (2007)
  5. Openreach (1948)
  6. FTTC (1915)
  7. Business (1801)
  8. Mobile Broadband (1584)
  9. Statistics (1483)
  10. FTTH (1369)
  11. 4G (1357)
  12. Virgin Media (1263)
  13. Ofcom Regulation (1225)
  14. Fibre Optic (1220)
  15. Wireless Internet (1218)
  16. Vodafone (917)
  17. EE (896)
  18. 5G (870)
  19. TalkTalk (812)
  20. Sky Broadband (781)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms , Privacy and Cookie Policy , Links , Website Rules , Contact