Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

Ofcom Open 100GHz+ Bands for Short Range Wireless Links

Thursday, October 1st, 2020 (11:46 am) - Score 1,656
data_communication

The UK telecoms regulator, Ofcom, has announced that they’re making 18.2GHz worth of spectrum available in the 100-200GHz bands (116-122GHz, 174.8-182GHz and 185-190GHz), which they hope will help to foster the development of extremely fast high capacity data links over short distances, among other things.

At present much of the Extremely High Frequency (EHF) spectrum in the 100-200GHz bands is being harnessed for Earth Exploration-Satellite Services (EESS), which are used to collect important weather and climate data. But Ofcom sees an opportunity to release some of this to support the development of new services, such as health screening (e.g. detecting skin cancer), quality assurance (checking for defects in manufactured pharmaceuticals) and “very high speed, high capacity data links over short distances.”

Admittedly a low powered wireless network communication in this band would be no good for broadband, at least not over any kind of viable outdoor distance, but it could play a role in helping devices to communicate over a very short-range indoor network and at extremely fast data speeds.

On the other hand, it could be argued that the 60GHz band in WiFi (starting with 802.11ad) already has a similar role, although so far that hasn’t been as widely harnessed as some would have liked, but things are starting to change (here). Part of this may be because most indoor devices can already do what they need to over the normal WiFi bands (2.4GHz, 5GHz and 6GHz), which have better range and are well supported.

Instead Ofcom envisages a variety of different use cases (as mentioned earlier) and their ideas on data connectivity are more centred around high-speed wireless connections at extremely short ranges, such as between microchips and circuit boards or Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

Ofcom Statement

We recognise that there is uncertainty on future demand for services using this spectrum, and what the services and applications developed will be. We will review developments in 2024 and will consider whether to propose changes to our approach.

We will not introduce provisions to authorise devices to operate on a licence-exempt basis in these bands at this stage, as we had proposed in the consultation. We may review the case for enabling licence-exempt use of these bands in future as part of the 2024 review.

Suffice to say that it might be awhile before we see any data connectivity applications for Ofcom’s new ‘Spectrum Access: EHF‘ licence.

Share with Twitter
Share with Linkedin
Share with Facebook
Share with Reddit
Share with Pinterest
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
Leave a Comment
2 Responses
  1. Buggerlugz says:

    This is the sort of thing I reckon could be worth installing on lamp-posts, working with close-in 5g masts for home broadband.

    1. Spurple says:

      I was thinking more “wireless HDMI”, so we can declutter our entertainment hubs. If its going to be as unreliable as wifi at sustaining very high throughput, then maybe not.

Comments are closed.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £15.00 (*25.00)
    Speed 50Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £19.50 (*22.50)
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • NOW £20.00 (*32.00)
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Shell Energy £21.99 (*30.99)
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Plusnet £22.99 (*38.20)
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: £70 Reward Card
Large Availability | View All
Cheapest Ultrafast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £20.00 (*35.00)
    Speed: 150Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £24.00 (*27.00)
    Speed: 100Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Community Fibre £25.00 (*29.50)
    Speed: 300Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Gigaclear £27.00 (*59.00)
    Speed: 500Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Virgin Media £27.00 (*51.00)
    Speed: 108Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Large Availability | View All
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. FTTP (3509)
  2. BT (3011)
  3. Politics (1927)
  4. Building Digital UK (1919)
  5. FTTC (1884)
  6. Openreach (1824)
  7. Business (1680)
  8. Mobile Broadband (1469)
  9. Statistics (1406)
  10. FTTH (1365)
  11. 4G (1271)
  12. Fibre Optic (1167)
  13. Virgin Media (1159)
  14. Wireless Internet (1154)
  15. Ofcom Regulation (1140)
  16. Vodafone (836)
  17. EE (830)
  18. TalkTalk (763)
  19. 5G (760)
  20. Sky Broadband (744)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms , Privacy and Cookie Policy , Links , Website Rules , Contact