Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

2022 Queens Speech Covers Digital Infrastructure and Internet Safety

Tuesday, May 10th, 2022 (2:14 pm) - Score 1,440
big_ben_uk_parliament_left_side_view

Prince Charles has today carried out the State Opening of Parliament event – formally still referred to as the “Queen’s Speech“, which sets out the UK Government’s agenda for the coming session. The speech contained no real surprises, but it did include and reiterate some bills that will impact broadband infrastructure and internet safety.

The speech itself is very much a ceremonial affair, which often only serves to feed the media with a tiny sliver of new information on forthcoming Government policy and precious little else in the way of detail. On the other hand, you do sometimes get a few surprises and as usual we keep an eye out for anything to do with broadband or telecoms.

In terms of broadband and internet policy, this year there were no huge surprises as most of what was announced has already been reported or introduced. This time, the relevant legislation covered the UK Infrastructure Bank Bill (UKIBB), as well as the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Bill (PSTIB) and the now extremely familiar Online Safety Bill (OSB).

We’ve summarised each of the three aforementioned bills below, based on the information that the government has published alongside today’s speech. The full briefing document can be found here.

UK Infrastructure Bank Bill

My Government will establish the UK Infrastructure Bank in legislation, with objectives to support economic growth and the delivery of net zero.

The purpose of the Bill is to:

Finalise the creation of the UK Infrastructure Bank by establishing it in law with clear objectives to support regional and local economic growth and deliver net zero, and ensuring it has the full range of spending and lending powers.

The main benefits of the Bill would be:

Ensuring the Bank can become fully operational and is able to utilise its £22 billion financial capacity to help grow the economy to address the cost of living and support the transition to net zero by 2050.

Providing a boost to infrastructure investment by cementing the Bank’s leading role in the market. The Bank will partner with the private sector to unlock more than £18 billion of additional investment in infrastructure.

The main elements of the Bill are:

Enshrining the Bank’s objectives and functions in legislation to ensure that it will be a longlasting institution with a clear policy mandate to support economic growth, including at a regional and local level, and the delivery of net zero.

Protecting the Bank’s operational independence by setting out clear accountability for how it is to be run, including reporting and board requirements.

Providing the Bank with the necessary powers to lend directly to local authorities and the Northern Ireland Executive, enabling the Bank to play a key role in delivering public sector infrastructure projects.

Territorial extent and application

The Bill will extend and apply across the UK.

Key facts

The UK Infrastructure Bank is a British stateowned investment bank. It is intended to help with the Government’s plan to support economic growth in regional and local sectors across the UK and reach net zero carbon by 2050.

The UK’s core infrastructure including power, heat and transport networks accounts for over twothirds of UK carbon emissions. Low carbon investment must therefore scale up quickly to deliver net zero. The Bank is part of a wider infrastructure strategy aimed at addressing this shortfall and builds on the existing expertise of the National Infrastructure Commission and the Infrastructure Projects Authority.

The Bank has £22 billion of financial capacity to offer a range of financial tools, including debt, equity and guarantees. It has already undertaken several investments, including a £107 million loan to support Tees Valley Combined Authority in the redevelopment of the South Bank Quay in the Teesworks Freeport area. Once finished, this will host a GE Renewable Energy site for the manufacture of offshore wind turbines, creating around 800 jobs.

The Bank will focus on investments in underinvested areas where it can take a lead in the market and encourage more private finance into these areas. Through this focus, the Bank will partner with the private sector to unlock more than £18 billion of additional investment in infrastructure.

Infrastructure projects required to meet our objectives often do not garner the confidence or secure the finance needed from the private sector as they tend to be complex, novel and longterm. The Bank will provide the longterm policy certainty required to support the growth of key nascent industries, for example Carbon Capture, Usage and Storage which encounters many of the same problems experienced by the offshore wind industry in its early days.

Disparity in infrastructure across the country has been identified as a key driver of economic disparities. Without intervention, the private sector is likely to continue to target geographic areas which have historically received higher levels of private capital for further investment.

Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Bill

The purpose of the Bill is to:

Improve cyber resilience and digital connectivity for individuals and businesses across the UK, further growing the economy.

Ensure that smart consumer products, including smart phones and televisions, are more secure against cyberattacks.

Accelerate and improve the roll out of mobile and broadband networks so that more people can have good digital connectivity more quickly.

The main benefits of the Bill would be:

Protecting consumers from cyberattacks by ensuring that manufacturers, importers and distributors only sell smart devices that meet tougher security standards.

Ensuring product security requirements, which protect devices from emerging threats, will be regularly updated. Manufacturers will also be required to have a point of contact for reporting software vulnerabilities. This will increase consumer confidence in new technologies.

Accelerating the rollout of broadband in the coming years, to enable faster and more reliable connectivity for more of the population. By 2025 the Government is aiming for a minimum of 85 per cent gigabitcapable coverage.

Reducing the number of new sites and installations needed to meet the Government’s digital connectivity targets by utilising existing equipment. This makes it cheaper and easier to install apparatus, giving operators more funding to invest in digital rollout, helping communities and businesses across the UK.

The main elements of the Bill are:

Requiring manufacturers, importers and distributors of smart devices to comply with minimum security standards. The legislation also imposes duties on these businesses to investigate and take action in cases of noncompliance.

Providing a robust regulatory framework that can adapt and keep pace with rapid technological advances, techniques used by cyber criminals, hostile states and broader global regulation.

Reforming the Electronic Communications Code to support faster, fairer and more collaborative negotiations for the use of private and public land to enable deployment of telecommunications networks.

Territorial extent and application

The Bill will, in the main, extend and apply across the UK.

Key facts

The average UK household was estimated to have nine or more smart devices in 2020.

In the first half of 2021 alone, there were 1.5 billion attempted compromises of connectable products, double the equivalent 2020 figure. Personal data has been lost and compromised devices have been used to launch attacks on businesses, governments and critical infrastructure. This Bill is a vital lever that will help protect these organisations from such attacks.

To provide faster and more reliable connectivity to both the public and businesses, the Government wants 95 per cent of the UK’s geographic landmass to have 4G coverage by 2025, and for the majority of the population to have 5G coverage by 2027.

Online Safety Bill

The purpose of the Bill is to:

Deliver the manifesto commitment to make the UK the safest place in the world to be online by improving protections for users, especially children, whilst protecting freedom of expression.

The main benefits of the Bill would be:

Preventing online fraud and scams by requiring large social media platforms and search engines to prevent the hosting or publication of fraudulent paidfor advertising.

Tackling the most serious illegal content, including child sexual exploitation and abuse.

Ensuring communication offences reflect the modern world, with updated laws to tackle threatening communication online as well as criminalising cyberflashing.

Safeguarding freedom of expression. Tech companies will no longer be able to arbitrarily remove content. If users feel like they have been treated unfairly, they will have the right to appeal. And journalistic and democraticallyimportant content will also be protected from arbitrary removal.

Restoring public trust by making companies responsible for their users’ safety online, whilst supporting a thriving and fastgrowing digital sector.

The main elements of the Bill are:

Introducing a duty of care on online companies, making them responsible for protecting users and tackling illegal content. This will create safeguards and standards so that users know when and how companies are using tools to identify illegal content and to stop harmful material being viewed by children.

Empowering users by ensuring the largest platforms give users tools to exercise greater control over the types of people and content they interact with.

Protections for democratic and journalistic content. The Bill sets a higher bar for the removal of content that contributes to democratic political debate, and all ‘recognised news publishers’ will be exempt from the Bill’s safety duties (for both children and adults).

Requiring providers who publish pornographic content on their services to prevent children from accessing that content, and for the largest platforms to put in place proportionate systems and processes to prevent fraudulent adverts being published or hosted on their service.

Ensuring the big social media companies keep their promises to users by enforcing their terms and conditions consistently. Requiring platforms to have effective and accessible user reporting and redress mechanisms to report concerns about harmful content, and challenge infringement of rights (such as wrongful takedown).

Designating Ofcom as the independent online safety regulator and giving it robust enforcement powers to uphold the regulation. This will include fines of up to £18 million or ten per cent of qualifying annual global turnover whichever is greater as well as business disruption measures, making them less commercially viable in the UK. Senior managers of tech firms can be held criminally liable if they fail to comply with information requests from the regulator.

Territorial extent and application

The Bill will extend and apply across the UK.

Key facts

In 2020, adult internet users in the UK spent an average of three hours and 37 minutes online each day, up by nine minutes compared to 2019. However, over 80 per cent of UK adults expressed a concern about going online in 2020.

In a monthlong period during 2020, the Internet Watch Foundation and its partners blocked at least 8.8 million attempts by UK internet users to access child sexual abuse material online.

During COVID19 lockdowns, research by YouGov showed that 47 per cent of children and teens had seen content they would rather avoid, leaving them feeling uncomfortable (29 per cent), scared (23 per cent), and confused (19 per cent). One in seven (13 per cent) were exposed to harmful content on a daily basis.

Share with Twitter
Share with Linkedin
Share with Facebook
Share with Reddit
Share with Pinterest
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
Leave a Comment
10 Responses
  1. Jay says:

    I think there might be a spelling mistake on here, the paragraph under “The main elements of the Bill are:” ‘ensuring’not enshrining?

  2. Mark says:

    Now to convince Nimbys,Councils and the vocal minority that infrastructure can help, otherwise in some areas this is all talk.

  3. Me says:

    All a load of bluster, does anyone believe a word this government says anymore? Well apart from the ‘net zero’ I see they are marching in with.

    1. Optimist says:

      Net zero is pointless as the UK produces only 1% of world emissions.

  4. james smith says:

    seriously how can there ever be a 100% safe internet? cars have been common since the 1950s, yet they are not 100% safe. Even without vehicles roads and paths are not 100% safe, ref pot holes, lack of grit when needed or muggers. With internet too many people trust things that they know perfectly well to be to good to be true yet try heir luck. common body shavers are not 100% safe yet who ever got compensation for injury caused!!!

    1. Mick coons says:

      By only allowing the government approved information an truly British intranet

    2. Optimist says:

      “Public safety” is always the excuse used by totalitarian regimes to ban the spread of information they don’t like.

    3. Lucian says:

      Safe Internet is only a possibility in the minds of those inept clowns in government. It’s basically an oxymoron.

    4. libertarian says:

      China and recently Australia are great examples of this “safe internet”. As soon as something is posted that goes against the government, it gets scraped from the internet and the person arrested. Arbitrary government oversight is fundamentally anti free speech and has no place in a free society

      The monarchy is now a propaganda arm for the government, taxes are being used to fund this facade. They need to be dissolved. Besides the Queen, no tourist cares about the royal family so they can’t even make that argument anymore

  5. Ken Taurus says:

    My only complaint with the Online Safety Bill is that it doesn’t make the use of Tor illegal.

    ISPs can actually tell if a person uses Tor, but they can’t tell what sites they visit.

    Seeing as the only people who use Tor in countries like the UK or Australia or any other first world country are either terrorists or paedophiles, there’s no reason why anyone here should be using it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Cheapest Ultrafast ISPs
  • Gigaclear £17.00
    Speed: 200Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Community Fibre £17.99
    Speed: 150Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Virgin Media £24.00
    Speed: 108Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £25.00
    Speed: 100Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Hyperoptic £25.00
    Speed: 158Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Promo code: BIGBANG
Large Availability | View All
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £17.99
    Speed 33Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Promo code: BIGBANG
  • Shell Energy £20.99
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • NOW £22.00
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £22.00
    Speed 38Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Plusnet £22.99
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: £75 Reward Card
Large Availability | View All
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. FTTP (4210)
  2. BT (3182)
  3. Politics (2151)
  4. Building Digital UK (2042)
  5. Openreach (1998)
  6. FTTC (1931)
  7. Business (1867)
  8. Mobile Broadband (1630)
  9. Statistics (1525)
  10. 4G (1398)
  11. FTTH (1372)
  12. Virgin Media (1301)
  13. Ofcom Regulation (1252)
  14. Fibre Optic (1246)
  15. Wireless Internet (1244)
  16. Vodafone (940)
  17. 5G (923)
  18. EE (920)
  19. TalkTalk (832)
  20. Sky Broadband (795)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms , Privacy and Cookie Policy , Links , Website Rules , Contact