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UPD2 BT Withdraw from Superfast Broadband Rollout in Kensington and Chelsea

Thursday, May 31st, 2012 (9:51 am) - Score 3,408
bt fttc fttp fibre optic broadband cabinet uk

BTOpenreach has shocked local residents and businesses in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (London, UK) after it sensationally pulled out of plans to deploy superfast broadband (FTTC) services at 108 local street cabinets (covering 34,200 premises).

The move followed shortly after the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Council (RBKCC) opted to reject 96 of the proposed cabinet upgrades because it wanted to focus on work that would “de-clutter” the local streets instead. Oh good choice ehumm.

A BT Spokesperson told ISPreview.co.uk today:

We can confirm we have ceased deployment of fibre broadband in Kensington and Chelsea. This is unfortunate but we were left with no option after having the vast majority of our applications rejected by the council. Other councils, including those of neighbouring boroughs, have shown a greater eagerness to enjoy the benefits of fibre broadband.

We will therefore re-focus our engineers’ efforts in other areas where planning authorities have taken a positive approach and are keen to ensure their residents and businesses can benefit from this technology.”

Baroness Jo Valentine, CEO of Business Membership Group London First, added:

London business needs world class communications infrastructure and delaying broadband rollout in Kensington and Chelsea is bad news for local businesses and residents; BT is able to work with other boroughs with conservation areas – Kensington & Chelsea need to up their game.”

BT has so far managed to install more than 4,000 “fibre” (FTTC / FTTP) broadband cabinets across London, including borough’s like Greenwich, a world heritage site. Certainly it is true that the new cabinets are somewhat large, green and have caused obstructions in other areas too. It’s just a shame that the council couldn’t find a happy solution like most places have.

Meanwhile RBKCC hopes that “one of [BTs] competitors will step into the role“, although most such solutions would still require some degree of street work. It will be interesting to see whether the local authority is able to maintain their a stance over the coming months.

UPDATE 3:55pm

Added an interesting comment from FTTH ISP Hyperoptic.

Dana Pressman-Tobak, Managing Director of Hyperoptic, told ISPreview.co.uk:

Local residents will no doubt be aghast by the news that BTOpenreach has pulled out of plans to deploy superfast broadband (FTTC) services to 108 local street cabinets (covering 34,200 premises) across Kensington and Chelsea.

In all probability, this news will not be met with surprise. As it stands, the UK fails to make the top 10 countries for broadband speeds and doesn’t even figure on FTTH leader-boards. This is because by and large the UK’s approach to broadband is simply about meeting government minimum targets. The inadequate solutions have partly been driven by the large providers who don’t want to cannibalise their customer base and where their existing technology is incompatible with the delivery of next generation broadband.

Hyperoptic was founded to change this mindset. Its solution is driven by the mindset that fibre all the way is the only option to deliver hyper-fast broadband to satisfy the consumer broadband requirements of today and the future. It is already rolling out its 1 Gig fibre-to-the-building across property developments in London. Its solution also dispenses the need for street cabinets, as the fibre goes straight into the building. It’s no wonder the councils didn’t want to add another host of “green boxes” to the already crowded streets.

Should residents in Kensington and Chelsea want to learn more about how they can still receive hyper-fast broadband, we urge them to get in touch.”

UPDATE 4th June 2012

Here’s the full statement from RBKCC.

RBKCC Statement on BTOpenreach

Every developer in Kensington and Chelsea must have regard to our historic streetscapes and listed buildings.

We expect developers, including utilities like BT, to work with us to find suitable solutions to ensure that our environment is protected.

BT was seeking permission for 108 cabinets, many of them in sensitive locations. It would not compromise on the number, or on the design.

It would not use sites that already had unused BT equipment and it would not consider putting the equipment underground or any other method.

We regret that BT are not proceeding with superfast broadband in the Royal Borough but virtually the whole borough is already covered by superfast broadband with Virgin, who obviously appreciate the very valuable market the borough represents.

Virgin have been able to do this without ruining our historic streetscape. They will also consider extending to the few streets they do not already cover in the borough if demand is there.

Leave a Comment
89 Responses
  1. Avatar ethel prunehat

    To quote Nelson Muntz, “Ha ha”.

  2. Avatar onephat

    if they don’t want them on their streets we will gladly have them on ours !!

  3. Avatar Kyle

    That should be it now. No return to that area following such high levels of opposition.

    People are crying out for this. So what if a cabinet appears – I’m proud to have them in the village for what they represent.

    I do hope BT are not criticised for this…

  4. Avatar No Rest

    Nimby’s shoot themselves in the foot.

  5. Avatar Bob2002

    SamKnows says that some of the borough is covered by Virgin so not everybody who lives there is going to be deprived of higher speeds. Wonder how long before the council has a change of mind?

  6. They could always give gigaclear a call, and get real fibre optic broadband that is fit for the future? Anything from a cabinet is going to be a temporary fix anyway. And like Bob says, if virgin are there already that will probably be faster anyway.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      If Gigaclear can do it yes indeed let them, more money back into the BT pot for other areas that want it

  7. Avatar Rob Turner

    I have been campaigning in my village in Norfolk for FTTC superfast Broadband tirelessly for the past 18 months, we would welcome BT and the street cabinets with open arms as would many other areas up and down the UK, what planet are these people on!!!!!

  8. They are in an urban environment where they already have broadband. They can afford to be picky, unlike the rurals who are desperate for anything that works. But be careful what you wish for Rob, cabinets are the dial up of the future. Its fibre we need. Moral and optic.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Why are cabinets dial up of the future they are just green tins? Why can’t cabinets be used as gpon points in the future to save more digging and duct space

      I know they are not needed for pure fibre deployments but as they are already their and perfectly placed for distribution it would be a waste not to use them

    • Avatar Somerset

      The issue is funding for FTTP, any ideas how to make it work in a urban area where the cost of digging etc. is significant.

    • Avatar Rob Turner

      I totally agree with you Chris if we lived in the ideal world but sadly we don’t.

      No one is willing to cough up the multi billion pounds needed to deploy FTTH-FTTP across the whole of the U.k,sadly the math does not add up and so it wont happen, at least not any-time soon.
      I am stuck on 2mbps and live 3 miles from my local exchange, my street cabinet is 700 meters away so when my exchange is upgraded I should get a reasonable speed uplift with FTTC, better than no improvement at all, Im sure you will agree.I am not alone, just one of many thousands of people around the country in the final third.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Chris Condor
      Quote “cabinets are the dial up of the future”

      Evidence for this statement? You seem to assume FTTP is automatically good when it is perfectly possible for “1Gbps” FTTP with poorly spec’d backhaul to perform worse than FTTC, just having a fibre link doesn’t make something good. You also continue to overlook the actual economics of providing either solution in an urban environment, where the time and complexity to deliver FTTP can make it much more costly, time consuming than digging a trench through a farmer’s field.

      Any business owner should know that future proof but uneconomic is not a great combination.

  9. Avatar Rob Turner

    @ Chris Conder.
    Oh one other point I forgot to mention regarding FTTC, as from next year BT will be offering FTTP on demand and so greater uplift of speed will be available if you need it and who knows what improvements will follow in due course?

  10. Avatar Deduction

    quote”@ Chris Conder.
    Oh one other point I forgot to mention regarding FTTC, as from next year BT will be offering FTTP on demand and so greater uplift of speed will be available if you need it and who knows what improvements will follow in due course?2

    Which is a silly solution as that will require additional street works (many homes do not have ducts from cabinets to pole, especially from new FTTC cabinets).

    I for one admire this council and residents decision. Now all what remains is to see if the few which can offer real fibre solutions instead of half baked FTTC step up and provide to that area. The copuncil has taken a risk in saying no to BT, if it pays off and they geta better solution from another party you just watch others that havent handed their funds to BT follow suit.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Yes it will be interesting to see who comes in and fills the void. I’m guessing nobody will to be honest. If its cheap to do FTTP in cities why aren’t other providers doing it across other cities already?

    • Avatar Deduction

      It depends how much funding this area has as to if anyone will step in. The cynic in me like yourself says nobody will, although if someone does this could turn out to be the start of something where next gen broadband funds are not just as good as automatically given to BT.

      If Hyperoptic were to step in and provide a FTTP solution for the same or near same cost as BT wanted for this part of London, then the future for those still undecided may look very rosy indeed.

    • Avatar Somerset

      BT were funding this.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      @Deduction

      Exactly what Somerset said, this wasn’t BDUK from my understanding it was on BT’s in house funded list, they have turned their nose up so they have moved on. There is no funding you speak of. The residents will have to pay the full price of whatever Hyperoptic or Gigaclear offer which I expect will be very pricey. So the residents go from a low cost up to 80Mbps solution with the ability for FTTP on demand next year to something costing much more.

      I hope someone else does come in as I’d like to see how much they can do it for, doubt it will happen though

      In fact it can’t be BDUK otherwise BT would not have one the bid with their nasty cabinets. Oh dear, your council has left you high and dry residents!!!

    • Avatar Deduction

      Never said it was BDUK money anywhere did i???

    • Avatar Somerset

      So where do you believe the funding is coming from for BT FTTC in majority of the areas completed so far? Clearly BT itself.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      “Never said it was BDUK money anywhere did i???”

      Deduction

      You said

      “If Hyperoptic were to step in and provide a FTTP solution for the same or near same cost as BT wanted for this part of London, then the future for those still undecided may look very rosy indeed.”

      BT didn’t want anything, they weren’t charging it was part of their own rollout. Your comment implied external funding?

    • Avatar Deduction

      Google ERDF

  11. Avatar Deduction

    Oh and to gloat a bit… For the BT defenders that are always asking me for an area in London BT aint supplying FTTC, looks like this is another to add to the list LOL

    • Avatar Somerset

      Where were you being asked, the list is available from BT.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      If you’re picking up on unanswered questions, how about coming back with your “evidence” of public money alreading current funding FTTC/P in London, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Basingstoke and Chelmsford?

      http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2012/04/house-of-lords-uk-superfast-broadband-inquiry-publishes-written-evidence.html

    • Avatar Deduction

      No idea what you are on about, my claim has always been BT are NOT funding the entire rollout in London, and seeing as they aint doing this area now that = them not doing London as a whole. Quite simple. Your 2 personalities can now stop pretending BT are doing the WHOLE of London at their OWN expense. cos they aint, they have walked away from this area, refusing to look at other solutions, obviously due to cost.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      That may be what you ish you claimed, whereas what you actually said was “… unless you can name a single area where BT have deployed FTTC with no investment be it UK, EU or local funding.”

    • Avatar Deduction

      Indeed and London along with BT in it are subject to the ERDF

    • Avatar Somerset

      Any details?

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      All very interesting, but I see you’re still not able to show public money has paid towards the cost of existing FTTC/P deployments in London, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Basingstoke and Chelmsford.

    • Avatar Somerset

      Very clever, but please show that funding for all the existing cabinets has been provided by ERDF?

    • Avatar Deduction

      @SOMERSET
      I never said cabinets. I said for DEPLOYING FTTC services. Just because BT buy a few cabinets in some areas doesnt mean data isnt running over fibre upgrades (be it at exchange or over fibre cabling) or staff that put the cabinet there were not paid for by public purse funds.

      I dont have to show anything about CABINETS…
      As your New_Londoner personality disorder points out my exact quote previously was…
      “unless you can name a single area where BT have deployed FTTC with no investment be it UK, EU or local funding”

      THATS DEPLOY…
      You do know what a network is and how it works dont you? A cabinet doesnt have magical fairy dust.

      London and DEPLOYING FTTC in it (thats upgrading exchanges, paying for cabling in general, paying for the staff which BT have employed more of last year to deploy the service and network). Has been subject to an ERDF cash. That cash in addition to paying for infrastructure in London for FTTC, would had paid for staff also.
      Extra staff BT freely admit they have taken on to speed up the roll out.
      So unless you can show an area BT used staff which were not employed due to winning any type of fund…. YOU FAIL and the entire of LONDON and the DEPLOYMENT of FTTC has in some way shape or form been subject to public purse funding.

      Suggest you get over your cabinet fetish and look at the bigger picture of what a network is and how it gets there in the first place.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      You really are struggling if you are claiming that ERDF money has funded FTTC deployment in London. If you honestly believe this to be true and not yet another delusion then please feel free to post direct links to the relevant tenders etc, rather that continuing with the same old baseless assertions not backed by evidence.

    • Avatar Deduction

      http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2012/03/bt-superfast-broadband-rollout-in-london-uk-to-create-26000-new-jobs.html

      QUOTE “London is of course expected to receive a huge slice of that, which will be worth between £10m and £25m; BT is vying for the lions share.”

      Opps!

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      You’ve overlooked the tense of the article, and not for the first time. You’ve repeatedly claimed that the existing deployment of FTTC/P has been part-funded by the public purse in every location. This article however refers to money that may be awarded in the future, none of which has been paid to date. In your words, oops!

    • Avatar Deduction

      Whether its been paid, going to be paid, is irrelevant, its money. London gets money, BT are taking money, thus FTTC in London = not entirely done at BTs expense.

      Stop trying to peddle the myth BT have or will do any area of this country at entirely their own expense, you have failed to show any before, and nopw we have comne full circle with you failing to show any again.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @ Deduction
      Quote “Whether its been paid, going to be paid, is irrelevant, its money. London gets money, BT are taking money, thus FTTC in London = not entirely done at BTs expense.”

      You clearly do not understand this yet do you. The money has not event been awarded by the UK government to the Mayor. After that there will need to be a tender to determine the supplier(s) that will get the money to fund something, which may or may not be FTTC deployment.

      How you can equate this with your baseless claim that BT are getting the money and in turn use that to substantiate your previous statement that all BT’s FTTC/P deployments across the country to date have had some form of public funding?

      Again note the tenses used, these are important. You have said that every deployment to date has benefited from public funding, including that in London, but have been unable to provide any evidence to back this up (you’ll remember I asked for this for the deployments in London, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Basingstoke and Chelmsford). EVen if BT did win some or all of any tender in London, it does not make your claim about past funding correct, and clearly your statement about the future is pure speculation anyway as you cannot know the outcome of a tender that has not even started.

      Hopefully that is cleared up once and for all.

    • Avatar Deduction

      It doesnt matter what has been awarded BT are not doing London at their own expense.

    • Avatar Somerset

      Ok, so BT are doing parts of London at their own expense. Did you find a link to show how they were receiving ERDF money for London?

    • Avatar Deduction

      Already posted a link to show it. Suggest you look back, if you have an issue with that link i suggest you contact the admin of the site where the information came from.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      Sorry to point this out again but you have still failed to post links to evidence showing that BT’s deployments of FTTC/P to date in London, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Chelsmford and Baingstoke w’re all part-funded fom the public purse. Shouldn’t be difficult giving your emphatic claims, just links to the announcements of the relevant contract awards will be fine. All pre-dating April 2012 of course when you first made these incredible claims.

    • Avatar Somerset

      Please provide links to the actual text, not Google or high level links.

    • Avatar Deduction

      Already did and quoted what was stated. Ill also repeat if you think this or any site is lying take it up with the admin.
      Im sure Mark will be delighted to hear his information according to you is not good enough.
      Than again i doubt you bothered to read back being the troll fool that you are.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      Still no links the? Obviously just a figment of your imagination once again!

  12. Avatar Zemadeiran

    When one door closes another opens…

    I live in w10 and we have BT manholes in front of our block.
    I for one will be starting a petition to have finer blown through the BT ducts.

    Can’t BT put the Vdsl switches in the building?!

    I live in an MDU, pull your finger out!

    What a load of shit

    • Avatar Deduction

      Theres no reason BT couldnt provide FTTC and place what would normally be in a cabinet underground… Apart from cost obviously.

    • Avatar Luke

      I’ve got Hyperoptic coming to my building – maybe you should give them a call and see if they’ll put fibre in to your building too?

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      Quote “Theres no reason BT couldnt provide FTTC and place what would normally be in a cabinet underground… Apart from cost obviously.”

      Don’t forget how many services are under our streets. Highly unlikely you’d find suitable locations to do this in central London, you’d be hitting the other services before you’d got a hole anywhere deep enough under the pavement.

    • Avatar Deduction

      No you would not be hitting other services, its exactly what is done in many other cities. There is no reason BT can not basically put it underground. Equipment that is used for traffic light systems, which either comes in cabinet form or is placed underground is no larger than the space a FTTC cabinet takes up (in fact if anything its bigger) and all over London they can regularly find space underground to install new traffic light systems.

      The only reason and it is the ONLY reason BT have not done that in London or ANYWHERE else be it a city or a RURAL conservation area, it ONE reason only… COST. Space has nothing to do with it. This is NOT the first time an area has had issues with BT wanting to place cabinets willy nilly. Prior instances have been in locations far less dense than London where BT could had also placed it underground, but would not, AGAIN due to COST.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      @Deduction

      Of course its down to cost, if most people don’t object (and most obviously don’t) it means you can do more with your pot of money, basic economics.

    • Avatar Deduction

      Id agree fibrefred but by walking away they aint doing more they are doing less.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Well they must have weighed up the cost of underground and ruled it out, it must be expensive. Why should this area get special treatment? They shouldn’t so they walked.

    • Avatar Deduction

      Because its not special treatment. The law allows a local authority to say NO to BT whacking cabinets everywhere.
      In a conservation area the law is even more on the councils side. If BT can not install their product within the guidelines of law within an area, maybe they shouldnt bother at all or make promises to do so which they have no intention of honouring. Oh and by “at all” i mean ANYWHERE that has a right to say NO we dont want more of your cabinets.

      Virgin i can tell you for a fact elsewhere in the country dug down in the pavement and effectively sunk the cabinet into about a 4ft hole in which to be allowed to install their product in that area. This is also what happens with some providers in Europe. A manhole cover is then placed on top (or it is with this virgin solution i saw installed) and the doors to the cabinet either face upwards towards that manhole cover or in other solutions an additonal couple of feet is dug around the unit see a person can get down in the hole to it.

      I actually doubt it costs that much more to do, probably more in terms of time than the actual solution.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      So you think it would be practical to dig 100+ holes, each of around 2m depth, and around 1.5m square, in the pavements of Kensington, without hitting any other services? And don’t forget you need to ensure they are made water tight as the cabinets are mains powered, so you’ll need to line the sides and certainly won’t be able to make do with a basic manhole cover.

      If you’re familiar with the area, you’ll know of the current trend in the wealthier parts to dig so-called super basements, which often extend well outside the footprint of the house. You’ll also know about the large volume of other services buried under the pavement, and realise the challenge of finding any locations where you could safely dig holes of that size, let alone finding 108. Oh, and imagine the disruption you’d cause undertaking that amount of work in such a congested urban area, I’m sure local residents and businesses would be delighted!

      It really is a pretty stupid suggestion from council jobs worths trying to justify their position.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      @Deduction

      And yet Virgin won’t cable up some new streets that have cable on an adjoining street?

      The sunken cabs I’m referring to are the hydraulic ones, this (lone?) Virgin one you speak of sounds like a right lash up. Not only does it cost more but there are additional things to consider like flooding.

      Anyway it matters not what we think the council have made their decision for their residents rightly or wrongly. Hopefully someone else will step up.

    • Avatar Deduction

      Practicality doesnt enter it, it could be done if they wished. The channel tunnel wasnt practical but they dug that.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      Quote “Practicality doesnt enter it, it could be done if they wished. The channel tunnel wasnt practical but they dug that.”

      Actually it does matter – if there is insufficient space to bury cabinets then it is a problem, as is the small matter of water proofing the cavities, and the likely level of congestion during construction. The issues affecting the channel tunnel were economic not practical, just ask the original shareholders! Important not to confuse the two, as they have very different meanings.

    • Avatar Deduction

      There isnt insufficient space, if there is a big duct with fibre cabling in it under the ground going to a surface cabinet there is likely space to shove the cabinet below the ground also.

      Congestion would not be an issue, it would be pavement works digging the hole in most cases, no need to shut a road. BT dont go shutting roads whenever they have to dig a hold on the pavement.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      You need to understand that there are more services than just telecoms under the pavement, so rather more complicated than you realise. Also, having space for duct is not the same as having space to accommodate on of the street cabinets underground, there is a pretty significance difference in size, with the depth required for the cabinet more likely to cause issues with other services.

      Congestion will be an issue if you want to excavate holes to the depth and size required to bury cabinets. You would need to close pavements and will almost certainly need diggers in the road to undertake the excavation – its a much bigger and more time consuming job than placing a cabinet on a plinth on the pavement, and that is of course assuming you can find suitable locations to excavate, which is very unlikely as explained above.

    • Avatar Deduction

      Its you that doesnt understand (as usual) and are wrong. Congestion would not be an issue. I saw the virgin cabinet get burried, no road needed shutting.

      If you can fit a cabinet above the surface you can fit it in the same spot below, the very fact on some they have to partially dig away at the surface (particularly in grassy areas) to lay a concrete foundation for the new cabinet illustrates that.

      If there is nothing a foot or so below the surface than apart from sewage pipes theres unlikely to be anything below that foot level to stop them.

      Couple that with the fact many FTTC cabinet are installed right next to current cabinets which often have a massive bundle of copper wires running to them and there is not likely to be anything else servely in the way near them. Certainly nothing that can not be slightly repositioned when digging. Other stuff like water lines which you are probably thinking would be an issue, you know about before you start digging, there will be tiny manhole covers around if thats the case. Stuff like gas pipework should not be an issue, electrical things underground nowadays can not be laid within a specific distance of them, and vice versa for new gasworks. They got tired of things going boom years ago.

    • Avatar Somerset

      Clearly burying a cabinet needs a design that enables it to be taken up for access and the size would be larger for the enclosure. In streets in London there may not be enough room due to other services to excavate the hole needed and the problem of adjoining foundations of walls and buildings.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Somerset
      Completely right, unfortunately its something that Deduction does not understand.

      @Deduction
      You really need to read up on this subject before commenting. Just because you can put a cabinet on the street, mounted on a concrete plinth, does not mean that you can dig a hole in the same spot that is of sufficient size to bury it, with space to open the doors, allow for access etc.

      You do in fact find different buried services at different levels below the street – how else do you imagine these services are able to feed into properties? Teleportation beams?

      In many parts of London you’d find the hole would effectively be the full width of the pavement, which will be a challenge if, for example, there are cable TV services, let alone the other services which are buried at lower leveles than telecoms.

      To dig a hole of the size and depth required will need mechanical diggers, not a couple of men with spades. This will mean pavement closures and quite probably some blocked carriageways, again depending on pavement widths. If you had any knowledge of street works you would understand this.

    • Avatar Deduction

      I understand it perfectly. Can only assume you have never seennew traffic lights being installed without a road closure and never seen virgin bury a cabinet either. Then again whatsmore likely is you are just here to make excuses for the cheap asses which are BT.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      It’s pretty obvious from your comments that you know nothing or very little about street works, as you’d not otherwise be making the clearly uninformed comments that you’ve posted here. Its pointless debating with someone that holds strong opinions about a subject that are uninformed by the facts.

      You’re of course entitled to your opinion, no matter how I’ll conceived, but would be well advised to desist from sharing it in this instance as you may mislead others that mistake your strongly held views as being in any way related to the truth.

    • Avatar Deduction

      Stop trying to debate things with me than and move your silly little troll bottom on.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      Perhaps you should get a job with the (obviously clueless) council. You’d fit in well!

    • Avatar Deduction

      If i worked for their council BT wouldnt of even had chance to ask to put cabinets in they would had been told to F&^K OFF before they asked LOL

      Talking of fitting in you do BT and their stupidity proud.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      Well let’s see what happens shall we. Still no sign of other providers installing FTTP despite hot air from Hyperoptic. Suggest we revisit this in 3 months and see whether there is any sign of progress from any supplier that will benefit the people living in the borough.

  13. Avatar zemadeiran

    If Openreach are running fiber to the cabinet, it makes sense to coninue said fiber into an mdu and have the switch in there?

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Zemadeiran
      I thought the Openreach solution for apartment blocks was actually FTTP, so no switch required? If you are referring to the cabinet for FTTC (?), I’d be surprised if they put that within private property given the access requirements.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      It is indeed, fibre termination point in the basement and then fibre to each apartment from there

    • Avatar Deduction

      Makes even less sense then, if ducting is so good it should be entirely viable to do that.

  14. Avatar Stoatwblr

    I live ~5 miles south of K&C (in Surrey)

    BT’s rollout in my area is already delayed by a year – no planning permission issues. They just can’t be bothered and Surrey CC are only funding rural notspots – usually pulling that (EU sourced) funding when BT suddenly finds it’s economic to wire up villages after all.

    Perhaps they can push on with stuff around here now – or more likely they’re speed up wiring those villages which weren’t on the planned list at all until competition was about to setup camp.

  15. Avatar FibreFred

    “We regret that BT are not proceeding with super-fast broadband in the Royal Borough but we expect other providers will want to offer super-fast broadband to our residents, in a very valuable market, without ruining our historic streetscape,”

    Other telco’s may want to offer super fast BB but at what cost, we shall see.

    • Avatar Deduction

      More a case of what the council means by “ruining our historic streetscape” one thing i will agree on is whoever does the work it either involves digging or a cabinet be it a FTTC or FTTH solution from any organisation.

  16. Avatar DTMark

    To provide superfast broadband here, in this village, to just 240 homes would need at least two more cabinets.

    Even though one of them could be one of the small ones since it would only service about 20 premises, I know full well BT would not get planning permission for the larger ones in the village. No way. They’re just far, far too big. Nobody would be prepared to look out of their window and see one of those.

    BT has offered and Chelsea have said no thanks. Perhaps they can go to a real broadband provider who might be pleased to supply them and demonstrate that you don’t need to install street cabinets to provide modern broadband.

    Then BT will pop back immediately and roll out the FTTP that was just never possible to do.

    Well done Chelsea, you should get yourself something futureproof.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Well it will be interesting to see if anyone else comes along to provide FTTP. I’m doubting it, not at a good price comparison anyway

    • Avatar Deduction

      There is no doubt they have took a gamble, but IF (and i agree its a big IF) it pays off then expect a few awkward questions to raise their head about costs and funding BT has had. Especially if a company provides the area with FTTH for less cost than its took BT to provide FTTC to a similar sized area.

    • Avatar New_Londoner

      @Deduction
      Since there is no public money involved in Kensington, the cost of deployment for any company is a matter between it and its shareholders. If it is such an attractive area to deploy FTTC or P, you’d have to wonder why none have come forward so far, there is nothing stopping any company doing so – other than council jobs worths of course!

    • Avatar FibreFred

      I’d be very surprised if anyone can deliver FTTP for the same price as BT can deliver FTTC and charge the end user £20-30 for the service.

      I’d love to say we’ll see but.. I doubt we will. The council has taken a big risk one I’m sure their residents will regret, although I think a lot of them already get decent ish speeds so many they won’t be bothered for a few years yet

  17. Avatar Deduction

    Oh i agree charging the end user £20-30 isnt likely from whoever, if anyone steps in. Then again i doubt the (as close as most will get) FTTP “ON Demand” solution from BT is going to cost us £20-30 a month either so it doesnt matter.
    Cost wise to install and deliver it, in that regard i highly suspect it could be done for the same or less than BT quote. With regards to installs and deployments thats one thing BT has NEVER been cheap at doing. I will say in their defence when it comes to digging things up they from my experience leave things in a better state than some companies… cheap though, they aint.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      lol

      What quote? You still don’t get it do you. BT were rolling this out with their own money as part of their own rollout, there was not quote.

      So if another provider comes in like Hyper or Virgin extend their network the resident will have a choice of one (not good for the consumer) and also have the pay a substantial installation fee or hope the council will subsidise the install (unlikely)

      With BT FTTC the most the consumer would pay for the install is £25 which is waived on some packages

    • Avatar Deduction

      “With BT FTTC the most the consumer would pay for the install is £25 which is waived on some packages”

      Suggest you check BT pages about that figure.

  18. Avatar Godfrey Kneller

    I don’t know who Kensington & Chelsea Council are working for? It is certainly not it’s residents as usual. The vast majority of us would welcome the boxes. They don’t look much bigger than the existing!
    It’s a pity K & C don’t take this stance with advertising hoardings, these are truly ugly!
    Kensington & Chelsea are an old fashioned council who can’t keep up with the modern age. We need new blood not the bunch of old buffers that infest the ugly red brick Town Hall.

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