Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

Three UK to Launch Mobile Network Level Advert Blocking

Friday, February 19th, 2016 (1:33 pm) - Score 722

Mobile operator Three UK has become one of the first providers in the country to announce the future roll-out of a new network-level ad blocking technology, which is the result of a collaboration with Shine Technologies that will focus upon tackling data hungry and overly intrusive adverts.

At present the operator has not revealed a lot about their plans or a time-scale for its supposedly “rapid roll-out,” although they do confirm that their intention is “not to eliminate mobile advertising“. Instead the aim is to “give customers more control, choice and greater transparency over what they receive,” which will be based around three goals.

3UK’s Three Principal Goals of Ad Blocking

1. That customers should not pay data charges to receive adverts. These should be costs borne by the advertiser.

2. That customers’ privacy and security must be fully protected. Some advertisers use mobile ads to extract and exploit data about customers without their knowledge or consent.

3. That customers should be entitled to receive advertising that is relevant and interesting to them, and not to have their data experience in mobile degraded by excessive, intrusive, unwanted or irrelevant adverts.

Most people would probably agree with the last two points, although the first one seems to be walking a difficult line between unrealistic expectations and opposing Net Neutrality policy. At this point it’s unclear whether Three UK expects advertisers to pay them money to have their adverts shown or if they’re merely using this as a reason to block certain adverts, such as those annoying auto-play video ads that ruin so many good sites and which can even crash your browser.

Tom Malleschitz, Chief Marketing Officer of Three UK, said:

“Irrelevant and excessive mobile ads annoy customers and affect their overall network experience. We don’t believe customers should have to pay for data usage driven by mobile ads. The industry has to work together to give customers mobile ads they want and benefit from.

These goals will give customers choice and significantly improve their ad experience.”

As usual there’s always a worry with leaving the definition of “irrelevant and excessive” adverts up to a commercial Internet provider, but we get the impression that Three UK’s approach may merely be to provide the tools and then allow customers to make their own choice. Sadly the sparse detail doesn’t help us to clarify.

No doubt Three UK will be cautious not to end up in a fight with the likes of Google, although usually the worst adverts have a tendency to come from smaller agencies with fewer quality standards and less regard for those who actually visit the websites where their promotions are shown.

It’s worth pointing out that one of the reasons why mobile operators are doing this is because very few mobile-based web browsers include good application-based blocking and so by offering such a solution they may well attract more subscribers. By comparison desktop users can access a much more sophisticated variety of blocking add-ons and extensions, thus there is less call for network-level blocking on that side of the fence.
Mind you Three UK isn’t the only mobile operator with an eye on network-level ad blocking, with EE (BT) also known to be working on a similar technology and no doubt others may follow.

Leave a Comment
7 Responses
  1. Avatar M

    Good on them, and why not? They’re a massive waste of bandwidth. Although there should be an opt-out for people who are concerned about losing access to a specific site for whatever reason.

  2. Avatar Billy

    When you are paying for data by the megabyte, who wants to pay to watch adverts?
    If the postman chapped on your door and asked for money for the latest batch of rainforest that now graces your doormat, you would soon tell him where to go for his postage.

  3. Avatar Gareth

    For once, I actually agree. Why do we pay to access the internet to then be bombarded with adverts. As long as they have some kind of opt-out for people who want full access, then I think it’s a brilliant idea. I can’t see many people actually opting out.

    • Probably because the Internet has changed the content model. In the old days if you wanted to read the latest news you had to buy a newspaper or magazine. But on the Internet everybody is use to that same content being “free”, except it isn’t.. there’s always a cost somewhere.

      Advertising is what helps to make such content open and available, as opposed to every website being closed / pay-walled like the Financial Times. I’ve never had a problem with the odd banner or link to help support that, but it can easily go too far and so many sites get ruined by intrusive adverts (thinking of all those local newspaper ones with masses of adverts all over the place.. as videos, backgrounds, pop-ups / pop-unders uggh).

    • Avatar Chris P

      Um, the adverts pay for the site that provides the content you want. Just like ads on tv pay for the channel.

    • Avatar Vince

      I’ll opt out because I do not want anyone filtering my internet access thanks.

      Also, you pay your Internet Provider to shift data from various places on the internet to you. You’re not paying for the infrastructure or content that you’re consuming when you pay for the Internet.

      People pay for Netflix, so why aren’t they paying for, say, the news articles they read.

      Right now they are… through advertising rather than subscription. No advertising means no revenue, so how then do those services exist?

  4. Avatar dragoneast

    As we learn (or rather, don’t) all the time, once you start regulating, you never stop. It just gets more and more convoluted. It would be so much easier if site owners, advertisers, and users all behaved responsibly. Some hope.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £19.95 (*22.00)
    Avg. Speed 50Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Promo Code: HYPER20
  • SSE £22.00
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Plusnet £22.50 (*35.98)
    Avg. Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: £50 Reward Card
  • xln telecom £22.74 (*47.94)
    Avg. Speed 66Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Onestream £22.99 (*34.99)
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Prices inc. Line Rental | View All
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. BT (2741)
  2. FTTP (2670)
  3. FTTC (1768)
  4. Building Digital UK (1723)
  5. Politics (1631)
  6. Openreach (1592)
  7. Business (1403)
  8. FTTH (1330)
  9. Statistics (1223)
  10. Mobile Broadband (1195)
  11. Fibre Optic (1048)
  12. 4G (1027)
  13. Wireless Internet (1009)
  14. Ofcom Regulation (1004)
  15. Virgin Media (992)
  16. EE (678)
  17. Sky Broadband (662)
  18. TalkTalk (653)
  19. Vodafone (651)
  20. 5G (487)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms , Privacy and Cookie Policy , Links , Website Rules , Contact