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Construction Starts on Cityfibre’s 1Gbps Home Broadband in Stirling

Monday, November 19th, 2018 (9:58 am) - Score 1,493
vodafone cityfibre micro trench ftth

Fibre optic network builder Cityfibre has announced that their £10m investment to build a new 1Gbps capable Fibre-to-the-Home (FTTH/P) broadband ISP network in the city of Stirling (Scotland), which will be sold on to consumers via UK ISP Vodafone, has now begun.

At present Cityfibre already has a 24km long Dark Fibre network in Stirling, which is used to serve public sector sites and businesses. But in April 2018 both Cityfibre and Vodafone jointly announced that they’d be using this as a stepping stone to build a much wider residential focused Gigabit broadband network (here).

All of this forms part of the operator’s £2.5bn investment to cover around 1 million homes by the end of 2021, which will then rise to reach a total of 5 million premises across 37 UK cities and towns by the end of 2024 (here).

Construction work has now officially commenced in the Cambusbarron area, with Bannockburn set to follow in the New Year. Cityfibre said they will also be extending their network to Bridge of Allan.

Elaine Doherty, Cityfibre’s City Development Manager for Stirling, said:

“For people across Stirling, their digital future is just around the corner. With work now underway we are only a few months from the first homes being able to access full fibre and that is something to be celebrated. Ultrafast broadband will help households access all the latest entertainment at lightning speed, but the benefits are far deeper than that – from enabling smart home technology to giving people the freedom to work from home with ease.

The investment also comes at a critical time for Stirling’s forward-thinking business community. Full fibre enables Stirling to be more innovative and productive, ultimately giving businesses the platform they need to realise their growth ambitions. And it won’t just improve business at home – it will also help businesses take their products or services to an international audience.”

Scott Farmer, Leader of Stirling Council, said:

“The start of these works by CityFibre signals the power being switched on for a new age for Stirling. Secure, high speed access to the internet is such vital part of the City’s infrastructure and is a key asset to encourage more businesses and visitors to the area.

This project will see homes and businesses in Stirling hooked up to some of the fastest internet available in the UK, connecting our communities, businesses and residents like never before as we continue to make Stirling a place where everyone can thrive.”

The first homes to benefit in Stirling are expected to go live during Spring 2019 and the build phase will then continue until sometime in 2020. Cityfibre has signed street works company PMK Civil Engineering to do the work on their behalf.

Unlike some of Cityfibre’s other targets, where there is usually plenty of competition among “ultrafast broadband” ISP networks, Stirling would appear to be a different kettle of fish. At present the operator has no major cable, G.fast or FTTP networks to rival them in the city and this should make it an interesting test case for their deployment.

With the right promotion Vodafone could do a good job of selling their Gigafast Broadband product in the area (our summary).

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Mark Jackson
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he is also the founder of ISPreview since 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
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10 Responses
  1. CarlT

    Think they’d have to wait until Virgin Media or BT are done with their work around here: no contractors to be had in this area. 🙂

    Of course if they do get contractors after VM have had them they’ll come ready to go for narrow trenching, which is nice!

    • Why would they get contractors from Leeds for a city so far away in Scotland?

    • CarlT

      Was referring to their project in Leeds – sorry I didn’t make this clearer! They’ve announced Leeds but I’ve no idea where they’ll get the manpower from to actually build. They have small amounts of civils in progress but we’re talking extending a single duct run to a business customer levels of work.

    • Joe

      You say that Mark but its surprising how far from ‘base’ some contractors work. I know of OR work being done by teams 150-200 miles from their ‘base’.

  2. Tim

    We will never reach 100% full-fibre. Why? Because all the fibre providers (apart from B4RN and a few others) will only build in the towns. We will end up with 2+ independent fibre providers in all (most) towns but fibre may never reach rural communities.

    What will happen for rural? Hard to say but I suspect most will have some form of part-fibre, probably still on FTTC. Others may have to rely on 4G or even satellite. It is possible that if ADSL is removed from the equation then FTTC cabinets could do VDSL on the lower frequencies thus increasing the range and getting 10Mbps to something like 99%.

    Rural communities need to do more and work together to make sure they aren not left behind!

    • Paul Knowles

      “Because all the fibre providers (apart from B4RN and a few others) will only build in the towns”

      Really? Have you never heard of Openreach deploying full fibre to some rural areas, usually where its cheaper to provide FTTP than FTTC? Some might even say rural areas are getting disproportionately large coverage of Openreach FTTP.

    • Joe

      Paul is correct there is more rural % fibre than urban (though that will change fast as urban rollout happens.

    • AnotherTim

      There is also some difference in terminology being used by various bodies. For instance Virgin Media announce a FTTP rollout to rural communities a few months ago. To qualify at least 30% of residents in each community had to sign up, with at least 1000 properties committing to sign up across them – in my area there isn’t a community of that size, and some properties already have FTTC so those of us still waiting are in clusters of around a dozen properties – that is 1% of the size VM require for a “rural” rollout.
      Similarly some of the BT “rural” FTTP is not very rural really. It makes for good headlines but does almost nothing for rural broadband availability.

    • CarlT

      VM’s FTTP cabinets can feed 3,000 premises, AnotherTim, and then there’s the cost of getting fibre to that cabinet. How do you suggest they make it worthwhile delivering to clusters of a dozen properties?

      Rural is quite a broad definition and isn’t far off 20% of the UK’s premises. I suspect most of those premises are in villages of hundreds of properties. Hamlets are, by definition, going to be a minority.

    • Fastman

      really misinformed as ever

      suggest you read the achnasheen case study or is that rural enough for you

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