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Vodafone UK Shaves £1 Off Superfast Home Broadband Prices

Thursday, November 1st, 2018 (10:24 am) - Score 3,693

ISP Vodafone UK has today reduced the monthly price of their “superfast broadband” (FTTC) and phone line rental packages slightly by £1, which means that new subscribers can take their 35Mbps (average speed) service from £20 per month or £26 for 63Mbps (non-existing mobile customers pay slightly more).

Both packages include a wireless router, unlimited usage, phone line rental, Parental Controls, 6 months of free F-Secure anti-virus software for up to 5 devices and an 18 month minimum term contract. A new line provision charge of £60 (one-off) may also apply if you don’t currently have a fixed phone line at your property, but for most people there are no upfront fees to pay.

As usual the monthly prices are +£2 per month higher for new subscribers that aren’t existing customers of Vodafone’s mobile network, but even without this it’s still very cheap.

Superfast 1 (Average of 35Mbps)
Speed Guarantee (Sync) of 25Mbps
PRICE: £20 for Voda mobile customers (£22 for non-mobile customers)

Superfast 2 (Average of 63Mbps)
Speed Guarantee (Sync) of 55Mbps
PRICE: £26 for Voda mobile customers (£28 for non-mobile customers)

Leave a Comment
10 Responses
  1. Tim says:

    Stop making it cheaper and invest the earnings from those that can get it to bring fibre to those that still can’t

    1. Chris says:

      Have you missed the bit where Vodafone is also bringing gigabit capable fibre to several towns and cities over the next few years?

    2. Tim says:

      Irrelevant because that is towns and cities that already have superfast. No point in over building when so many are still without.

    3. Mark Jackson says:

      A market has to remain competitive and viable. You don’t achieve that by sitting on your hands in urban areas until all rural locations are at the same level. That is not realistic.

      Vodafone’s FTTC is a commercial service (Openreach) and I doubt they’re making much money from it at the current pricing. Meanwhile the FTTP build is largely using money from Cityfibre, which is private investment and can thus go wherever it pleases.

      To do rural areas you really need public match-funding to cover the economic viability gap or a social approach to deployment like B4RN. Vodafone is not involved with any of that. They’ve only been back in the consumer fixed line market since late 2015. I’d give them a chance to grow first.

    4. AnotherTim says:

      I agree with Tim (good name BTW). It is incredibly frustrating to see the prices and choices for urban areas getting better and better, while less commercially viable areas get left behind. I fully understand the economics, and if I ran a company I’m sure I’d do the same (if I was allowed to).
      However it is creating a very very unequal situation. Broadband is now generally considered to be utility – like electricity and mains water. Now, prices for utilities do vary from area to area, but the areas are large. There is also little variation in the electricity or water provided to different areas, or properties within an area.
      Broadband is different.
      Not only does it differ in availability, price, speed, and amount of choice from area to area, it can differ between neighbouring properties.
      We now have the situation where many urban areas have a choice of superfast broadband providers at a price that is much less than other pay for sub 10Mbps ADSL. After 2020 many urban areas will have Gigabit connections available, while EO and rural areas will have the opportunity to request a 10Mbps connection under USO. That is 1% of the speed others can have at a lower price.
      I know people will say that BDUK is dealing with those, but they are not. The rollouts are glacially slow, and in some areas are going backwards (in my area Fastershire have gone from having a rollout plan to not having a rollout plan – five years after I was “in plan”, they now don’t have a plan.
      It is the regulator’s job to ensure some equality (because commercial realities will never provide it). That is totally lacking.

  2. Nic says:

    The Vodafone prices are actually really good. They also offer 15% discount if they can’t achieve 25Mbps, which brings the price down even more. This has allowed me to go from a 6Mbps ADSL line to a 10Mbps VDSL line, for less than I was previously paying for ADSL.

    1. AnotherTim says:

      Yes, the prices are very good. However, Vodafone like many other ISPs are just cherry picking areas, and refuse to provide broadband at all in areas such as mine. And as you are now paying less for FTTC than you were for ADSL it makes it harder for altnets to provide broadband in less commercially viable areas as they will be seen to be very expensive in comparison.

  3. Jamie Simms says:

    Does Vodafone broadband still use BT wholesale connections out of the exchanges or do they have their own fibres into the core ?

    1. Declan says:

      Sure they do still use the bt wholesale network as i am with Vodafone for broadband and my exchange is not unbundled.

  4. Steve says:

    My vodafone contract is up and I am currently paying 25pm and have recently received notice they are increasing this to 28pm. I am also a mobile customer with them. As I am quite far from the local cab I only get about 26mb and don’t want to negotiate with VF as virgin are installing FTTP in my area, I just wish they would hurry up!

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