Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

South Norfolk UK Claims 100% Coverage of 10Mbps+ Broadband

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018 (9:39 am) - Score 543
norfolk uk broadband map

The South Norfolk Council claims to have been successful in its ambition, which sought to be the first rural district in East Anglia to ensure that every home and business can order a broadband ISP connection with a minimum download speed of 10Mbps. But to get it you’ll have to sign-up with a wireless ISP.

At present the state aid supported Better Broadband for Norfolk (BBfN) project with Openreach (BT) is already working to ensure that 95% of Norfolk can access a fixed line “superfast broadband” (24Mbps+) network by March 2020 (here) or 91% in South Norfolk alone (at present the whole of Norfolk is on 92%+). Most of this is based on hybrid fibre FTTC technology.

The Government and Ofcom have separately been working to establish a new “legally bindingUniversal Service Obligation (USO) from 2020 (here), which will aim to cater for those who miss out on the BBfN project. Under this system consumers in such areas will be able to request a 10Mbps+ capable broadband speed (download) from a designated ISP (uploads of 1Mbps+).

In response the South Norfolk Council last year established a new agreement with InTouch Systems (here) that aimed to support the deployment of a new 10Mbps+ capable wireless broadband network in digital disadvantaged parts of the region (i.e. fixed wireless broadband ISP ITSwisp).

The work now appears to have completed and as a result there are a total of 33 wireless transmitters (20 on masts and buildings, 13 on churches, 24 located in South Norfolk and 9 just over the border). Apparently many of those already using the network are receiving speeds of up to 30Mbps, with 10Mbps being the minimum.

Michael Edney, Deputy Leader of South Norfolk Council, said:

“Once again we are leading the way in making sure that all of our residents and businesses have access to decent Broadband speeds. Working with InTouch Systems we are providing access to wireless Internet for homes and businesses who have not been able to benefit from the work done by Better Broadband for Norfolk.

The Council will not directly benefit from our investment, but we are doing it, because it’s the right thing to do for our residents. A decent broadband service is essential in nearly every aspect of our modern lives – shopping, homework, video streaming, social networks and so much more. The previous broadband speeds left some residents and businesses feeling excluded and frustrated making it vitally important that we did something to help – and now we have.”

At this point we note that the council originally invested £570,000 into the Better Broadband for Norfolk (BBFN) programme. By comparison their agreement with InTouch Systems seems to involve a separate investment of £330,000 to deliver broadband into the areas not covered.

We should point out that ITSwisp is NOT a designated USO provider and they have also not as yet expressed a serious interest to Ofcom in becoming one. In other words, this could perhaps be seen as a temporary solution until the real USO or something better arrives.

On this front we note that the provider’s website primarily only promotes packages with download speeds of up to 8Mbps, while the 10Mbps package only appears to be available if you have a grant from the Broadband Delivery UK based Better Broadband Subsidy Scheme. But there’s a problem here because that voucher scheme is due to end this year.

Another issue is that the ISP’s website only promotes the top package as offering speeds of “up to” 10Mbps, which is no longer allowed by the Advertising Standards Authority (i.e. they should be using ‘average speeds’ as measured at peak time). Nevertheless Michael Edney does clearly state that “many” users are receiving around 30Mbps on the network, which suggests that the 10Mbps figure is probably being conservative.

However if you do take their 10Mbps package then the subsidy should cover any installation costs and locals will then only need to pay £31.99 per month on a 12 month contract. Granted it’s not the cheapest for such speeds but if you’ve struggled to get above 2Mbps before then it’s still quite a big improvement.

Delicious
Add to Diigo
Mark Jackson
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he is also the founder of ISPreview since 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
Leave a Comment
6 Responses
  1. Optimist

    If 30 Mbps is achievable wirelessly then why are they wasting money on paying BT Openreach (or whatever it’s called this week) on upgrading fixed lines to remote locations?

    • Joe

      Its achievable – though not everywhere (either at 30 or at all in some cases) – but its ultimately a bit of a dead end.

    • EndlessWaves

      Because while 30Mbps is an acceptable low end connection today (e.g. watching top quality video is only possible if the connection is otherwise unused) it’ll rapidly become too slow. It was only a decade ago that 8Mbps was considered an excellent connection, but these days we expect 50Mbps+ for heavier users.

      Putting in FTTP connections ensures it can keep up for another couple of decades, not just the next three years.

      Oh, and these places aren’t at all remote. Many of the notspots in South Norfolk are within 10-15 miles of Norwich, which is not just the biggest city in Norfolk but in the entirety of East Anglia. It’s not the distance that’s the issue, it’s the patchy rollout and the lack of commercial attractiveness for the small groups that have been missed out.

  2. FullFibre

    Wireless coverage equals zero coverage in my eyes. I mean it’s better than nothing in the short term but long term it’s no solution. Upload speed is still none existent as well.

    • JamesMJohnson

      Then there’s also latency and atmospherics to account for.

    • Gadget

      Don’t forget a transmitter can only supply a certain maximum bandwidth, shared across all users so too many people using wireless from a single mast/transmitter and the service will slow and collapse until additional sectors/masts/backhaul is supplied.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Promotion
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • Hyperoptic £18.00 (*22.00)
    Avg. Speed 30Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Code: CHRISTMAS18
  • Onestream £19.95 (*34.99)
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • TalkTalk £22.50
    Avg. Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Direct Save Telecom £22.95 (*29.95)
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited (FUP)
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £23.00 (*25.00)
    Avg. Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Prices inc. Line Rental | View All
Poll
*Javascript must be ON to vote*
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. BT (2290)
  2. FTTP (1755)
  3. FTTC (1521)
  4. Broadband Delivery UK (1491)
  5. Openreach (1234)
  6. Politics (1228)
  7. Business (1093)
  8. Statistics (966)
  9. Mobile Broadband (886)
  10. Fibre Optic (881)
  11. FTTH (819)
  12. Ofcom Regulation (814)
  13. Wireless Internet (807)
  14. 4G (769)
  15. Virgin Media (743)
  16. Sky Broadband (546)
  17. TalkTalk (525)
  18. EE (510)
  19. Vodafone (399)
  20. Security (371)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms  ,  Privacy and Cookie Policy  ,  Links  ,  Website Rules