Home
 » ISP News » 
Sponsored

BT Openreach Moots Mobile Infill Solution for Isolated UK Rural Areas

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012 (7:57 am) - Score 1,070

BTOpenreach has informed mobile operators of its intention to develop a new mobile infill solution that could potentially leverage BT’s existing fixed line network to provide mobile services into parts of the UK that suffer from “non-existent or patchy” coverage. But could it also help fixed line broadband performance?

At this stage Openreach is still being somewhat coy with the details of its already “drafted” product and merely claims to be looking “at opportunities” for such a solution, which requires the group to seek “engagement and feedback … from interested operators” before deciding whether or not to turn it into a commercial product.

It is known that the solution is likely to make use of small cell technology (i.e. cheap and low-powered radio access nodes that only have a very limited range of up to around 200 meters) and a growing interest from government and local communities to resolve mobile “not spots“. The last part is a reference to the £150m Mobile Infrastructure Project, which originally aimed to extend mobile services to “at least 98%” of the United Kingdom by the end of 2017 (currently 95%) before doubts were cast over such a target.

Openreach’s Statement

Openreach is looking at opportunities to support the roll out of mobile coverage to areas of the UK where coverage is either non-existent or patchy, typically more rural areas. In these areas traditional mobile network deployment solutions have proved difficult or uneconomic to provide.”

BT certainly has plenty of options at its disposal and most recently conducted trials of White Space (IEEE 802.22) technology as a solution to delivering faster broadband services into mostly isolated rural areas, although it will no doubt also take a sniff at the forthcoming auction of 4G / LTE compatible radio spectrum (800MHz and 2.6GHz) to see if there’s anything suitable for its purposes.

Some readers will be quick to note out that many of the locations likely to benefit from a mobile infill solution would also include those that are currently underserved by BT’s existing fixed line network, where slower broadband speeds and sometimes even unreliable phone connections can be common.

Crucially this perception might be missing the real trick. If BT can establish a potential market for such a solution, especially among major mobile operators, then that would in-turn make investment in remote rural areas more economically viable. This could provide for a greater incentive to upgrade the local infrastructure. Now it starts to make sense.

Leave a Comment
4 Responses
  1. Avatar DTMark says:

    Right, I’ve read it three times and it sounds promising. I just can’t make out what it is 😉

    Take here for instance. All operators except one available, various hills, no network has a strong signal. Best is Three, but that has poor building penetration. So most are on O2 which is fairly dire for call quality and dropped calls. But it’s the best there is when you’re indoors.

    “Poor mobile network connectivity” and “poor broadband” both featured strongly in our village survey.

    Area is maybe 4km square. O2 cell is about half way up the left hand side, the one most connect to.

    With such limited range, wouldn’t you need these repeater things absolutely everywhere – like one for each three houses? So, 80 of those repeaters.

    What do they then piggy back onto – it can’t be DSL based cack. That’s going to run out of bandwidth even with voice calls, it’s so very poor. Yet, that’s all there is here.

    Whereas the BT model is based on scarcity the mobile model has always been based on coverage which is why there’s almost no broadband here via fixed lines (at my 6Meg threshold, only 2 of the lines can get it, average is only about 2.5Meg) yet there are about six cells in range from different parts of the village.

    So BT helping mobiles with coverage sounds quite amusing. (Cellnet – giggles)

    I feel I don’t really understand what this is about. The mobile operators know full well where they want to deploy, and what is covered and what is not and are presumably fairly happy about that and wouldn’t want to be handing BT cash to piggy back over their network for the sake of a few users..?

  2. Avatar Nathan Rees says:

    did the e & d buttons fail to wake up prior to 8am “engagement and feedback from interest operators, “radio access nodes that have very limit range of up to 200 meters”

    1. Mark Jackson Mark Jackson says:

      I’ll cough up to the “limit” typo but Openreach made the other one and it’s our policy not to edit what we quote from somebody else.

  3. Avatar zemadeiran says:

    What a load of ****!

    So BT wants to implement a small/femto solution?

    That would surely need a physical connection to the area being served by the small cells would it not?

    How about running a fiber to the community into maybe a green cabinet? Defeats the purpose really does it not?

    White space has proven to be slow and problematic.

    Grasping at straws comes to mind.

Comments are closed.

Comments RSS Feed

Javascript must be enabled to post (most browsers do this automatically)

Privacy Notice: Please note that news comments are anonymous, which means that we do NOT require you to enter any real personal details to post a message. By clicking to submit a post you agree to storing your comment content, display name, IP, email and / or website details in our database, for as long as the post remains live.

Only the submitted name and comment will be displayed in public, while the rest will be kept private (we will never share this outside of ISPreview, regardless of whether the data is real or fake). This comment system uses submitted IP, email and website address data to spot abuse and spammers. All data is transferred via an encrypted (https secure) session.

NOTE 1: Sometimes your comment might not appear immediately due to site cache (this is cleared every few hours) or it may be caught by automated moderation / anti-spam.

NOTE 2: Comments that break our rules, spam, troll or post via known fake IP/proxy servers may be blocked or removed.
Cheapest Superfast ISPs
  • TalkTalk £22.00 (*29.95)
    Speed 38Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Vodafone £22.00 (*25.00)
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Hyperoptic £22.00
    Speed 50Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Promo Code: HYPERSPRING
  • Shell Energy £22.99 (*30.99)
    Speed 35Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: 12 Months of Norton 360
  • Plusnet £22.99 (*36.52)
    Speed 36Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: £50 Reward Card
Large Availability | View All
Cheapest Ultrafast ISPs
  • Gigaclear £24.00 (*44.00)
    Speed: 100Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Offer Code: SPRUCE20
  • Vodafone £26.00 (*29.00)
    Speed: 100Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Virgin Media £28.00 (*44.00)
    Speed: 108Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
  • Hyperoptic £29.00 (*35.00)
    Speed: 150Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: Promo Code: HYPERSPRING
  • TalkTalk £29.95 (*39.95)
    Speed: 145Mbps, Unlimited
    Gift: None
Large Availability | View All
The Top 20 Category Tags
  1. FTTP (3220)
  2. BT (2928)
  3. Building Digital UK (1855)
  4. FTTC (1852)
  5. Politics (1837)
  6. Openreach (1753)
  7. Business (1593)
  8. Mobile Broadband (1377)
  9. FTTH (1359)
  10. Statistics (1354)
  11. 4G (1185)
  12. Fibre Optic (1129)
  13. Wireless Internet (1110)
  14. Virgin Media (1102)
  15. Ofcom Regulation (1101)
  16. EE (787)
  17. Vodafone (779)
  18. TalkTalk (736)
  19. Sky Broadband (715)
  20. 5G (672)
Promotion
Helpful ISP Guides and Tips
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Sponsored

Copyright © 1999 to Present - ISPreview.co.uk - All Rights Reserved - Terms , Privacy and Cookie Policy , Links , Website Rules , Contact