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Superfast Cornwall UK Project Connects 31000 to BT Fibre Broadband

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013 (1:02 pm) - Score 914

Some 31,000 customers have now subscribed to a superfast broadband (FTTC/P) connection in Cornwall thanks to BT’s joint £132m public (EU) and privately funded Superfast Cornwall project, which aims to make the operators network available to 95% of local premises by the end of 2014.

The figure, which marks a steady increase from the 28,000 recorded in July 2013 and the 24,000 in May 2013, also reveals that 3,700 of the connections have been taken by businesses. Overall some 200,000 local premises are now covered by the new network (more than 75% of the area). Funnily enough that’s what they claimed it was at back in June 2013 before a correction (here).

The latest area to receive the new service is Wadebridge, which is a small town in northern Cornwall with a population of around 7,000 people. Feel free to head over to the projects website if you want to indulge in some PR spin and read about how happy the Royal Cornwall Showground is with their new service.

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35 Responses
  1. Avatar FibreFred

    31,000 out of 200,000 is about 15% uptake so what are the other people using then, presume they are happy with it?

  2. Avatar Roberto

    “Some 31,000 customers have now subscribed to a superfast broadband (FTTC/P) connection in Cornwall thanks to BT’s joint £132m public (EU) and privately funded Superfast Cornwall project”

    So that so far is around £4,300 per connection. Makes other projects look utter bargains.

  3. Avatar GNewton

    The low uptake of VDSL services indicates that for many people it is simply not the right product, contrary to what some proponents here on this forum claim. Yet so much unneeded taxpayer’s money was given to BT, the whole BDUK process is a mess.

    Perhaps a nationwide fibre-on-demand broadband product charged at a reasonable average radial distance setup fee (not dependant on fibre-cabinets) would have been a better starting point, certainly better than wasting more than a Billion Pounds of taxpayer’s money. We are not talking here about broadband services, not leased lines which is not the same.

    • Avatar Roberto

      “The low uptake of VDSL services indicates that for many people it is simply not the right product…”

      Certainly looks that way with typical take up both in this area and BT Retail customer base in general only hovering around the 20% mark at best (this is even considerably less than that).

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Do you really believe that GNewton?

      Do you believe there’s masses of people in the area stuck with very low ADSL speeds that aren’t going to VDSL because its not proper FTTH

      I’m holding my sides awaiting your response, just in case 🙂

    • Avatar GNewton

      @FibreFred: do you have any better suggestions on how not to waste so much taxpayer’s money for a telecom product the vast majority isn’t even interested in?

    • Avatar FibreFred

      “for a telecom product the vast majority isn’t even interested in?”

      If the vast majority haven’t bought FTTC in 5yrs time from now then I’ll be inclined to agree on not interested and possibly waste.

      But… its still very early days.

    • Avatar MikeW

      It has to be remembered that it is a dynamic market, and growing all the time.

      Openreach reported, in some recent quarterly results, that takeup increases *within a phase* at a rate of 1% every 2 months. And that it is a steady climb, without any signs of a plateau yet for the earliest installation phases.

      If that is true in Cornwall, we should expect that recently-upgraded cabinets will only have a zero or 1% takeup, while cabinets upgraded a year ago running at 6% and cabinets upgraded 2 years ago running at 12%, etc… It looks to me, though, that Cornwall is running ahead of those numbers.

      If takeup is averaging 16% across all covered areas in the county, both new and old, then it suggests that the oldest areas may well be closer to 30% takeup – which sounds pretty good to me.

      And if the older areas have achieved that, then we can look forward to the newer areas achieving the same level over the next 2 or 3 years.

      Not sure why people are making judgments now based on obviously increasing numbers. Unless they have an agenda that they desperately want the numbers to fit into.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      “Not sure why people are making judgments now based on obviously increasing numbers. Unless they have an agenda that they desperately want the numbers to fit into.”

      Quite simply Mike, haters. Plain and simple , they want it to be seen as a failure, but as I’ve said and you are saying, its early days.

      Claiming that people aren’t taking up FTTC as they are expecting FTTH, complete fantasy on their part

    • Avatar Roberto

      “If the vast majority haven’t bought FTTC in 5yrs time….”

      Er its already been out over 3 years. So using that logic you want to wait 8 years to deem if a product is a success.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      5yrs from when the rollout is finished

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Because you can’t buy it if its not there, there are quite a few reasons why I believe the take up is as it is at the moment:-

      1) People in the deployed areas already have access to Virgin
      2) People in the deployed areas already have good ADSL speeds so for now are happy but will in the next 5yrs (or less) move to FTTC
      3) People want to move to FTTC but it is only offered by BT in their area and they don’t like BT (some don’t would you believe 😉 )

      Point 3) will be help a lot by Sky expanding their FTTC availability , lots of people like Sky. It would be helped even further if TalkTalk got involved but as we know they are too wrapped up in penny pinching.

      That’s why I believe the take up is as it is at the moment, we need the other big players to get on board and Sky have only done that pretty recently so I expect it will take some time before people start moving to Sky FTTC in addition to BT FTTC

    • Avatar TheFacts

      18 home and 36 business ISPs to choose from. Including Sky and TalkTalk.

      What is the ‘right product’?

    • Avatar GNewton

      The fact remains: Those BT loyalists here are unable to answer the question how to avoid wasting taxpayer’s money. FibreFred is quite naive in his beliefs about future VDSL takeup.

      And I never said that people won’t choose VDSL now because they might wait for fibre broadband. I was merely making some suggestions on how wasting taxpayer’s money could have been avoided. The BDUK is a mess, so is the anachronistic fibre tax. The only ones laughing now are greedy BT shareholders. And those with a “I am alright Jack” attitude having a nice VDSL line.

    • Avatar TheFacts

      To get a ‘nationwide fibre-on-demand broadband product’ would involve the infrastructure being currently installed with fibre ducting and head ends. So when this is in FoD will be available.

      And before someone says, nationwide is not 100%…

    • Avatar TheFacts

      ‘The only ones laughing now are greedy BT shareholders’ Plus the shareholders of all the ISPs who see their companies gaining more customers and profit as a result of BDUK.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      @GNewton

      “Those BT loyalists here are unable to answer the question how to avoid wasting taxpayer’s money. ”

      Obviously you are pointing at me.

      I cannot answer a question that I don’t share a view on, if you asked me if I felt taxpayers money is being wasted I’d say no, so I can’t tell you how to avoid something I don’t agree on in the first place.

      Instead of telling me its wasted money why don’t you tell everyone your ‘better’ plan and how its funded?

    • Avatar JNeuhoff

      @GNewton: You are wasting your time here with FibreFred (lets call him CopperFred fron now on). He believes his beloved copper VDSL (and yes, he already has such a line) is the non-plus ultra, he can’t understand other people’s concerns about the BDUK, and how it wasted so much taxpayer’s money. He also believes that nextgen broadband is an essential utility.

      It’s funny to see how these BT proponents have no solution to offer either on how to bridge the increasing digital divide. More than half of the VDSL lines don’t even go faster than 42mbps because of signal degradations over the copper wires lengths, so is not exactly a future-proof technology, in fact many VDSL lines will already, or soon will be, struggling with e.g. new high density video streaming services. VDSL will be a hopelessly outdated technology lobg before a fibre cabinet investment has been recouped.

      I think the proposal to scrap the fibre tax is good, helps with infrastructure competition and the creation of more altnets. Even when going with copper, there are better options than fibre-cabinets, such as VDSL-rings. Remove red tapes, and regulatory BT favoratism, and market forces will do their jobs eventually.

      While we are at it, scrap the multi-billion tax funded HS2 project, and use some of its money to bridge the digital divide if nextgen broadband is so important.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      JNeuhoff I wish you’d just stick to using one name 😐

    • Avatar GNewton

      @FibreFred: While I do not necessarily agree with every point posters like JNeuhoff or Roberto come up with, I think the issue of using taxpayer’s money so that only a selective group of people can benefit from some sort of VDSL whilst others don’t, is a valid concern.

      See for example
      http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2013/10/microsoft-estate-agents-bash-slow-uk-broadband-speeds.html or
      http://www.uswitch.com/broadband/news/2013/06/uk_think_tank_calls_for_5_5bn_full_fibre_broadband_investment/ or
      http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/may/20/high-speed-broadband-not-hs2

      The whole BDUK process is almost like a fiasco and will cause more discussions.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      But you haven’t given us your solution, only said that BDUK is a mess which as I’ve said many times before I agree. The whole BDUK process was a shambles, you won’t get any argument from me there, the BDUK process was a massive waste of money when you end up having one company winning all of the bids.

    • Avatar GNewton

      @FibreFred: What a big turn around! You have always created the impression of defending VDSL or BT all the time. Now that you finally agree that the BDUK was a waste of money, try to look beyond the narrow VDSL scope for some solutions. So far you haven’t. I have made at least some suggestions, such as getting rid of the fibre tax, and promoting more network infrastructure competition and a free market.

      Also, a true split up of BT has long been overdue. The access network infrastructure should not be part of BT Group.

      You yourselves have listed some possible reasons why the VDSL takeup might have been so slow so far. I go one step further with my claim that VDSL is not the right economic choice for most of the final third, especially not for small towns and rural areas. Do some research at your own local council level, it might lead to something for a start in your own area.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      No I said the bduk “process” is a shambles , nothing to do with any technology

    • Avatar FibreFred

      And for what its worth I also agree on other solutions, wireless should have played a part but that was ruled out by BDUK themselves, no-one else.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      And as for getting rid of the fibre tax I think someone has already debunked that issue, might have been New Londoner, I think he provided some links about a challenge in court or something.

      Selling off BT’s access network just won’t happen, you can’t make a private company sell off one of its prized assets and no government would try to do it (even if it could) so… there’s no point holding out any hope there.

      The main problem with competition in this country in terms of broadband is that rivals are lazy and don’t want to spend any real money with the exception of Sky

    • Avatar Roberto

      “5yrs from when the rollout is finished”

      The rollout finishes 2017 so you want to wait to 2022 to see if FTTC is good enough and successful LOL come 2022 i think it will be dead tech entirely.

  4. Avatar GNewton

    My last sentence should have read:

    We are talking here about broadband services, not leased lines which is not the same.

  5. Avatar Trips

    Is there any chance that the children on here stop their petty squabbles that ruin thread after thread after thread?

    They makes the threads on here incredibly tedious to read at times.

    • Avatar Pete

      Agreed this thread is a mess 80% of the postings are from one person.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      90% of your posts are classed as trolling so it does surprise me that you are still allowed to post regardless of how many amazing guises you try to portray

    • Avatar Pete

      I have never posted here until Yesterday. That makes no sense and judging by most of your posts that is a common theme to them. Trips obviously hit the nail on the head when he referenced you and a couple of others being children.

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