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Global FTTH Uptake Ranked - UK Remains M.I.A
By: MarkJ - 21 July, 2007 (8:20 AM)

The Fibre To The Home Council has released its first ever official ranking of FTTH broadband deployments in the world’s economies. It will come as little surprise to see the likes of Hong Kong, South Korea and Japan at the top with the UK nowhere to be seen:

According to [THE] ranking of FTTH deployments, 21.2 percent of homes in Hong Kong are wired with FTTH, followed by South Korea at 19.6 percent and Japan at 16.3 percent. Scandinavian countries occupy the next three positions, with Sweden having 7.2 percent of its households connected to FTTH, Denmark at 2.9 percent and Norway at 2.5 percent.

Taiwan, Italy, People’s Republic of China, The Netherlands and the United States round out the top 11 economies, with FTTH penetration rates of between 1.4 and 1 percent of households. Only economies with penetration of 1 percent or more were included in the ranking.

The three regional FTTH Councils joined together to create this first official global FTTH ranking in order to provide the telecommunications industry, governments and regulators with a unique snapshot of international fiber access penetration. Going forward, the councils will update and re-issue the rankings on an annual basis, as well as work jointly to further refine the research methods in order to provide more in-depth information.

The global ranking follows the unified definition of FTTH terms announced by the three councils last year, and which has formed the basis for recent market research by each council. For completeness and accuracy the ranking includes both FTTH and FTTB (fiber-to-the-building) figures, while copper-based broadband access technologies (DSL, FTT-Curb, FTT-Node) are not included.

The exclusion of Fibre To The Curb (FTTC) could mean problems for BT because that is one of the methods they're mooting for a possible future deployment. Hopefully the FTTH council will at least recognise other FTTx styles separately in the future.


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