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First Trial Users Live on Sky and TalkTalk’s 940Mbps Broadband in York

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2015 (8:00 am) - Score 4,082
York UK FTTH sky and talktalk network map august 2015

As expected TalkTalk has confirmed that the first trial customers are now live on their joint 940Mbps capable Fibre-to-the-Home (FTTH/P) broadband network in the city of York, which is being built alongside Sky Broadband and Cityfibre. An early 2016 commercial launch has also been set.

Apparently “hundreds of residents and small businesses” will take part in the trial and once complete the new Ultra Fibre Optic (UFO) network is expected to become commercially available to everybody in the covered areas from January 2016.

Presently most of the Phase One roll-out, which is supported by an investment of £5m from each ISP and aims to cover 20,000 premises (i.e. further investment will be required to do the other 60,000), has been focused upon the northern half of the city.

However TalkTalk states that they’ve so far only passed 1,800 homes within the Rawcliffe, Clifton, Huntington and the Groves areas. At this rate the ISPs grand aspiration to reach 10 million UK premises with a similar fibre optic network seem like a long way away, although the York deployment is still very much an experimental / learning one.

Dido Harding, TalkTalk CEO, said:

Ultra Fibre Optic will truly transform the broadband experience in York and we’ve been blown away by the local support. For such a leap in performance you’d expect to pay more, but we believe ultrafast broadband should be available to everyone.”

Derek Paterson, A Trial Customer from Ings View, said:

I’m really excited to be part of this programme. Like most households, we’re doing more and more online. It’s not just the speed that’s appealing, knowing that we can all do as much as we want online at the same time is also a huge advantage.”

Both Sky Broadband and TalkTalk have already revealed their packages and prices for the service, which you can view here and here respectively. At present TalkTalk are the only ones claiming to offer the 940Mbps service at “no extra cost” above the price of their entry-level unlimited SimplyBroadband bundle, although in actual fact the ultrafast service currently costs a few pounds less (£21.70 per month all-in vs £25.20 on SimplyBroadband [line rental charge included]).

Mind you most of York is already well covered by a significant amount of Virgin Media (cable) and BTOpenreach’s (FTTC) admittedly somewhat slower hybrid-fibre superfast broadband services. But Sky and TalkTalk are likely to focus on migrating their existing subscribers and who among those wouldn’t want a 940Mbps capable service, especially if it’s the same price or lower than you already pay for standard broadband.

Never the less the big question still remains, can this network be deployed cheaply enough in order to turn it into a truly viable proposition for other UK cities? The actual roll-out costs so far have been in a similar ballpark to BT’s FTTC network (£500 per premises passed), which is good, but that doesn’t yet include the cost of connecting the final drop to individual homes and businesses (that part can add costly complications).

At the same time there have recently been a few small problems with bad street works, which required repairs (here) and that would normally add to the cost model. But strangely the council seems to be the one conducting the fix and not Cityfibre.

Leave a Comment
17 Responses
  1. Avatar FibreFred

    Ultra fibre optic? Is this some new fibre we aren’t aware of? 🙂

    • Yup, it is to help customers tell the difference between fibre optic made of glass and fibre optic made of twisted copper! 🙂

    • Avatar Neil

      The word “ultra” instead of “super” appears to be another stupid term BT and the government came up with. Used to describe anything over 100Mb.
      Example story…
      http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2015/03/uk-budget-2015-osborn-pledges-to-deliver-100mbps-ultrafast-broadband.html

    • Avatar FibreFred

      No no I get the ultra broadband as a marketing term , but ultra fibre? Afaik it’s fibre there is no ultra version?

    • Avatar Neil

      As stated another stupid marketing term.
      Its like saying 24Mb+ is “SUPER” fast, when clearly it is not. In fact you could argue its more “SUPER” slow compared to other products.

      Stupid BS terms mainly thanks in part to BT, Government and the ASA.

    • Avatar MikeW

      If any of the terms are BS, then we usually get to blame VM. Not BT.

      As for ‘ultra fibre optic’, I think you need to treat it as branding, in the same vein as Infinity, that lets them add a gimmick like the UFO.

      Perhaps they even managed to trademark it.

    • Avatar Neil

      Nope Virgin Media and the ASA are the initial to blame for allowing copper products to be called “fibre”.

      The whole “Super” and now “Ultra” vomit is down to the government and BT.

      Super fibre/Super fast and other such rubbish terms all came about around the time of the BDUK. BT used it first in their Infinity adverts, Virgin, Plusnet, Sky, Talk Talk and others with TV adverts copied soon there after.

      No doubt this time around BT will be calling their G.FAST ultrafast and Virgin will copy when their new products arrive also.

    • Avatar FibreFred

      I might put an enquiry in to ask what the difference is between a standard fibre to the home and there ultra version 🙂

    • Avatar Neil

      The situation and the terms being used has became more than a joke. Any query i suspect will be met with the response of the government say anything over 100Mb is “Ultra”. See….

      https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-digital-communications-infrastructure-strategy/the-digital-communications-infrastructure-strategy
      quote”In 2010 we set out our goal for the UK to have the best superfast broadband network in Europe. Today we announce our ambition that ultrafast broadband of at least 100Mbps should become available to nearly all UK premises.”

      Putting in any request to have it explained is silly anyway, all providers are going to use the term just as they did “Super fast”….

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Yeah but.. as I’ve said I get the whole super, ultra broadband etc. This is Ultra fibre, it sounds like its a new version of fibre which.. I’m sure it isn’t.

      It is a very specific term to use… just Ultra broadband tells people its faster than super, but Ultra fibre suggests a new faster form of fibre than other fibre to the home

    • Avatar Neil

      “…Ultra broadband tells people its faster than super”

      I dunno which people they would be. The literal latin translation of both is “above or beyond”.

      Im waiting for 500+Mb and the inevitable BS “hyper” term to describe that 😉

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Which people? The ones sky and talk talk want as customers I guess

    • Avatar Neil

      They are not going to be the only ones at it…
      http://www.ultrafast-openreach.co.uk/

      Note the top banner 😉

      Personally i think it is to be expected Virgin will follow, the next round of BT and Virgin TV ads will talk about “Ultra” fibre and how its upto 5x faster than “Super” fibre.

      Its just meaningless blub dreamed up by some advertising agency.

      I wonder what fibre was before it was “super fast”….. “medium walking pace” perhaps 😉

    • Avatar Neil

      The word “fast” in that headline is utterly superlative to the English language. What is Ultra Fibre to people if it is not fast? Do they need to doubly enforce for the terminally stupid that something new which is tagged as “ultra” is better?

      Its beyond silly from all of the providers, having a gutless regulator like Ofcom does not help matters. 🙁

    • Avatar FibreFred

      Yep they should just state the speed after all one persons fast is another person’s slow

  2. Avatar joe pineapples

    jammy arabs

  3. Avatar Hedges

    Lucky york people, that over 30 times quicker than my infinity connection.

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