By: MarkJ - 26 November, 2009 (12:29 PM)
p2pBroadband ISP Virgin Media UK looks set to be the guinea pig for Detica's new CView system, which is designed to measure copyright infringement on an Internet provider’s network via use of Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) technology. Virgin Media has agreed to trial the solution as part of the technological platform for its planned music service.

The news follows shortly after Ofcom confirmed that it had held talks with Detica, a BAE subsidiary specialising in data gathering and processing, about the possible use of its Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) system by UK ISPs (here).

Detica states that CView™ applies high volume, advanced analytics to anonymous ISP traffic data, and aggregates this information into a measure of the total volume of unauthorised file sharing. The tool claims to meet stringent consumer security design principles (whose principles?) to protect privacy and is powered by a fully automated, closed system which does not identify individuals or store their data.

Andy Frost, Director of Media at Detica says:

“The Digital Britain report set out some bold targets to reduce illegal file sharing on ISP networks, but until now measuring the extent of the problem has been based on conflicting consumer surveys and speculation. We hope the launch of Detica CView™ will pave the way for stronger collaboration between ISPs and the media industry, by enabling all parties to more accurately measure the success of shared initiatives, reduce digital piracy and provide an unparalleled level of accuracy.”

Jon James, Executive Director of Broadband at Virgin Media comments:

"Understanding how consumer behaviour is changing will be an important requirement of Virgin Media's upcoming music offering and, should they become law, the Government's legislative proposals will also require measurement of the level of copyright infringement on ISPs’ networks. Detica's CView™ technology potentially offers a non-intrusive solution which enhances our understanding of aggregate customer behaviour without identifying or storing individual customers' data."

It would perhaps be wrong to point an accusing finger at Virgin Media for using such a technology, which many privacy campaigners have strong reservations about. Indeed we would like to see more publicly released technical details about precisely how the system functions. Ultimately this is something that the government intends to force upon the majority of UK ISPs whether they like it or not.
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Comments: 7

asa logoZOldDude
Posted: 27 November, 2009 - 5:18 AM
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Facist Pig actions.
They should be more into getting a monthly payment from the users of the service than playing cops for media.
asa logoCarrot63
Posted: 27 November, 2009 - 8:57 AM
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A technology that is distrusted by the public, a ans a system evidently lacking in transparency and an ISP that squandered its customers trust through its enduring interest in phorm. Hardly a recipe for happy subscribers. "They" don't trust us, but we are supposed to trust them?

I wonder if Virgin Media will try and shoehorn a little extra value in by adding 'phorm lite' to the system while pleading that they are merely complying with the law.
asa logoDude
Posted: 28 November, 2009 - 9:06 AM
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Invasion of privacy is illegal!!! My bits and bytes are for my eyes only. The UK and anyone that follows had better understand the consequences of their actions. Virgin Media ????. We should have words with many lawyers on this issue.

Suppose their billfolds will empty quickly.
asa logosilas
Posted: 28 November, 2009 - 10:18 AM
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.....And the advert below says "break free from your phone line" thats obviously not the same free as used in freedom is it Mr Virgin.
asa logofekemall
Posted: 29 November, 2009 - 9:23 PM
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i dont know about you
but i will go to blockbuster and copy every fekin dvd they own without a care in the world
fek i will go to the library and borrow every cd they own and copy that too
oh and lets not forget i will borrow a mates dvd?cd and copy that as well.
thats how feked the system is dont try to stop piracy cos u cant end of conversation
asa logoNOCARES
Posted: 29 November, 2009 - 9:29 PM
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LETS FACE IT THIS WILL PUSH PIRACY BACK UNDERGROUND
YOU KNOW WHERE YOU GET 20 OR SO EMAILS CONTAINING ALL OF THE LATEST MOVIE IN COMPRESSED FORMAT
HA HA OR LETS GO TO THE LOCAL VIDEO STORE HIRE A 19.99 DVD FOR 3.00 QUID AND COPY IT.HA HA HA
asa logobackstabber
Posted: 27 January, 2010 - 7:42 AM
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Been with Virgin 18 months now but no longer. I am cancelling my complete package ( quids 50 plus a month )and go elsewere IE BT with no phorm intrusion. I suggest all Virgin users do the same.

Not that I download illegally, I already pay for the broadband service so why dont the copyright holders go after the ISP's for a cut of the lucratrive broadband cake?. Its tha fact I'm being treated like a wayward child gets up my effing goat. You cant stop illegal downloads by spying on the population.



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