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Cheshire East UK Claims 95% Superfast Broadband Coverage

Tuesday, June 26th, 2018 (2:43 pm) - Score 777

The state aid fuelled Connecting Cheshire project, which is working with Openreach (BT) to extend the local reach of “fibre broadband” (FTTC/P) ISP networks to an additional 100,000 premises by the end of 2018 (98% coverage), has announced that 95% of Cheshire East can now access “superfast” speeds of 24Mbps+.

The fact that only the east side of Cheshire has announced meeting the UK government’s Broadband Delivery UK coverage target is perhaps a hint that the overall project still has some work left to do. We should also point out that B4RN’s community driven 1Gbps FTTH rollout recently entered the county and is busy making progress (here).

Councillor Paul Bates, Cheshire East Council, said:

“Fibre broadband is having a huge impact, with so many more online services reliant on a fast internet connection, whether at work or at home.

I would urge everyone to check their availability and where possible, make a switch – as we have a ‘gainshare’ arrangement with Openreach, which means we can reinvest a share of their revenue into more coverage to reach areas not yet able to benefit.”

Matthew Hemmings, Openreach Infrastructure Director for the North, said:

“This is without doubt an extraordinary achievement and I’d like to thank the hundreds of Openreach engineers across Cheshire and our suppliers, who have worked so tirelessly to make this happen. High-speed fibre broadband helps to ensure that businesses thrive and don’t just survive and it helps to keep communities connected. Whatever you do online, you can do it better with fibre broadband.”

We should point out that Cheshire has already set aside an additional public investment worth £7.25 million for a future coverage expansion contract (here).

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Mark Jackson
By Mark Jackson
Mark is a professional technology writer, IT consultant and computer engineer from Dorset (England), he also founded ISPreview in 1999 and enjoys analysing the latest telecoms and broadband developments. Find me on Twitter, , Facebook and Linkedin.
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9 Responses
  1. Avatar chris conder says:

    Wonder why we are being inundated at the moment to help areas in Cheshire get broadband? Not a day passes without MPs, parish councillors and the public writing to us to extend the B4RNCheshire project. I also wonder why the honourable councillor Bates is calling it fibre broadband when it comes down phone lines.

    1. Avatar Obvious isn't it? says:

      Called FIBRE broadband because part of the local loop is replaced with FIBRE to allow a BROADer frequency BAND in order to increase data throughput… Dime Bar?

    2. Avatar un4h731x0rp3r0m says:

      “Called FIBRE broadband because part of the local loop is replaced with FIBRE…”

      Er no nothing is replaced in the local loop, when it comes to FTTC.
      Fibre from a cabinet is ADDED back to the exchange, it does not REPLACE anything that was there to begin with or what is still used.

    3. Avatar Obvious isn't it? says:

      Called FIBRE broadband because part of the local loop is OVERLAID with FIBRE to allow a BROADer frequency BAND in order to increase data throughput… Dime Bar?

      Pedants happy now?

    4. Avatar un4h731x0rp3r0m says:

      “….part of the local loop is OVERLAID with FIBRE….”

      Now what is the other part of the local loop constructed of in this “fibre” product?

  2. Avatar chris conder says:

    Well in that case lots of rural areas have fibre dial up then? all the exchanges have had fibre since the 90s, and extending it a few hundred metres to an obsolete splitter cabinet only makes a bit of difference for some who are close to it, the phone lines remain the same and so it should only be allowed to be called fibre if the fibre goes to the premises.

    1. Avatar Obvious isn't it? says:

      Which part of the network between the exchange and the prems were converted to fibre in your world to provide dial up fibre?

    2. Avatar un4h731x0rp3r0m says:

      “Which part of the network between the exchange and the prems were converted to fibre in your world to provide dial up fibre?”

      I guess that would depend on where you live and if a large data center or similar connected to fibre cable is between you and the exchange, or further away from the exchange relevant to your premise location.

  3. Avatar Henry says:

    Thinkbroadband seems to suggest that Cheshire West & Chester has about the same superfast coverage as Cheshire East. The other councils in Connecting Cheshire, namely Warrington and Halton, seem to have even higher coverage

    So I would guess an announcement specifically about Cheshire East (which runs the website) was more about trumpeting achievement to local councillors there rather a comment about the project as a whole

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